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Ades Web Magazine: Hong Kong

By: Manuel Balossi

... 110 Lantau Island 131 New Territories 155 Kowloon 248 Macau 295 Hong Kong From Kowloon Ades Web Magazine 2010/03 Hong Kong Island centrAl - verticA... ...18 H o n g K o n g Ades web magazine centrAl - hsbc building - looking up from ground floor 19 H o n g K o n g Ades web magazine centrAl - ifc1 foot... ...s web magazine soho - queen 's roAd 61 H o n g K o n g Ades web magazine Aberdeen - A fishermAn 62 H o n g K o n g Ades web magazine Aberdeen - A p... ...Ades web magazine Aberdeen - A pArk 63 H o n g K o n g Ades web magazine Aberdeen - Ap lei chAu bridge 64 H o n g K o n g Ades web magazine Aberdee... ...Ades web magazine Aberdeen - bAmboo 65 H o n g K o n g Ades web magazine Aberdeen - ferry pier 66 H o n g K o n g Ades web magazine Aberdeen - prAy... ...yellow houses 109 H o n g K o n g Ades web magazine Lantau Island lAntAu from po lin monAstery 111 H o n g K o n g Ades web magazine lAntAu pier - ...

...A subtropical climate, skyscrapers everywhere, busy people, mountains of electronic gadgets, wonderful sceneries suspended from hills to the sea: this is Hong Kong!...

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The Williams Record

By: Student Media

...fe escorts tor visitors of the fair sex and also two illustri- ous orators from the lower classes. Ijet me introduce to you the sophomore orator, Mr. ... ...he Geography of France and Its Influence on the Cnlture and History of the People. ' ' Clark Hall. TUESDAY, MARCH 19 7.30p. m.—Y. M, C. A. elections. ... ...here to thank the various alumni who, unsolicit- ed, have contributed news from time to time. The same prinoiplo obtains in the collection of under- g... ... who have not yet had the ad- vantage of being able to consider tpiestions from an alumni stand point. For the stutleiit, it is a channel thrc.ugh whi... ...s Ready-to-Wear Tailor-Hade Barnard & Co. North Adams Williamstown LOTS OF PEOPLE NEVER WORRY ABOUT STYLE, JUST BUY Fownes AND HIT IT RICH New Members... ...e.. New York Cor. Main & Bank^Sts., No. Adams Conklin's rulingPen For busy people. No bother. Fills itself. Cleans itself. No dropper. Nothingtotakeap... ...dness, he was only twelve years old when he entered Mar- isohal college at Aberdeen univer- sity. Influenced here and at the University of Edinburgh b...

...000 copies distributed in Williamstown, in addition to more than 600 subscribers across the country. The newspaper does not receive financial support from the college or from the student government and relies on revenue generated by local and national ad sales, subscriptions, and voluntary contributions for use of its website. Both Sawyer Library and the College Archives m...

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Terrorists and Freedom Fighters

By: Sam Vaknin

...art thereof, may not be used or reproduced in any manner without written permission from: Lidija Rangelovska – write to: palma@unet.com.mk or to ... ...bespierre that has the preeminent rabble-rouser of the French Revolution leaping up from his chair as soon as he saw a mob assembling outside. "I ... ..."For I am their leader." http://www.salon.com/tech/books/1999/11/04/new_optimi sm/ People who exercise violence in the pursuit of what they hold to... ...1. A hard core of idealists adopt a cause (in most cases, the freedom of a group of people). They base their claims on history - real or hastily co... ...pace the idealists claim as their own. 2. The loyalties and alliances of these people shift effortlessly as ever escalating means justify an e... ...gling Macedonia and the Bulgarian race." TODOR ALEXANDROV, The Leader of the IMRO from 1911 to 1924 The Treaty of Berlin killed Peter Lazov. A ... ... have been hanged." When one of his dissidents, Adler, died in 1937 on the trip to Aberdeen, Freud wrote to Zweig: "I don't understand your sympath... ...derstand your sympathy for Adler. For a Jew-boy out of Viennese suburb, a death in Aberdeen is an unheard - of career in itself". Freud's break up...

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Theological Essays and Other Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

...a State University is an equal opportunity university. Contents SECESSION FROM THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND .................................................. ... II. OL. II. SECESSION FR SECESSION FR SECESSION FR SECESSION FR SECESSION FROM OM OM OM OM THE CHUR THE CHUR THE CHUR THE CHUR THE CHURCH OF CH OF CH... ...ery awful) ques- tion, What is to be the fate of the Scottish church? Lord Aberdeen’s Act is well qualified to tranquillize the agitations of that bod... ...intercepted by Lord Melbourne, might have prevented them in part. But Lord Aberdeen has no power to stifle a conflagration once thoroughly kindled. Th... ...antime these great disturbances are not understood in England; and chiefly from the differences between the two nations as to the language of their se... ...ere too definite to be easily disturbed. These steps are sustained by Lord Aberdeen as realities, and even by the Non-intrusionists were tolerated as ... ...ginal act of invitation. And yet, in defiance of that notorious fact, some people go so far as to assert, that a call is not good unless where it is s... ... inoperative, is and must be moonshine. Yet be- tween two moonshines, some people, it seems, can tell which is the denser. W e have all heard of Barme... ...ady, who cannot bear to be mixed up in any common charge together with low people, abomi- nates such words as ‘sin,’ and wills that the parson should ...

...Contents SECESSION FROM THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND ................................................................ 4 TOILETTE OF THE HEBREW LADY........................................................................................ 43 CHARLEMAGNE...

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The English Mail-Coach and Joan of Arc

By: Thomas de Quincey

...A A A A ACE CE CE CE CE Some portions of this Introduction have been taken from the Athenæum Press Selections from De Quincey; many of the notes have ... ...s Selections from De Quincey; many of the notes have also been transferred from that volume. A number of the new notes I owe to a review of the Select... ...a a week to carry out his later project of a solitary tramp through Wales. From July to No- vember, 1802, De Quincey then led a wayfarer’s life.* He s... ... our little planet, the Earth, however cheap they may be held by eccentric people in comets: he had invented mail-coaches, and he had mar- ried the da... ...ne single college; in Oxford there were five-and-twenty, all of which were peopled by young men, the élite of their own generation; not boys, but men:... ...he year of Trafalgar), it had been the fixed assumption of the four inside people (as an old tradition of all public car- riages derived from the reig... ...Bristol, Manchester, York, Newcastle, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Perth, Stirling, Aberdeen— expressing the grandeur of the empire by the antiquity of its tow...

...Excerpt: Some portions of this Introduction have been taken from the Athenaeum Press Selections from De Quincey; many of the notes have also been transferred from that volume. A number of the new notes I owe to a review of the Selections by Dr. Lane Cooper, of Cornell University. I wi...

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Love and Friendship and Other Early Works Also Spelled Love and Freindship a Collection of Juvenile Writings

By: Jane Austen

................................................................. 93 A LETTER from a YOUNG LADY , whose feelings being too strong for her Judgement led h... ........................................ 96 A TOUR THROUGH W ALES—in a LETTER from a YOUNG LADY— ........................................................... ...he author. “Deceived in Freindship and Betrayed in Love.” Letter the First From Isabel to Laura How often, in answer to my repeated intreaties that yo... ...nly inconvenience attending it was the Scarcity of Plays which for want of People to fill the Characters, we could perform. We did not mind trifles h... ...stily broke from us and seating himself in his Chaise, pursued the road to Aberdeen. Never was there a better young Man! Ah! how little did he deser... ...d it, he soon became perfectly recon- ciled to the match. The Estate near Aberdeen which my brother possesses by the bounty of his great Uncle indepe... ...ut one genteel family since we came. Mr and Mrs Marlowe are very agreable people; the ill health of their little boy occasioned their arrival here; y... ...sley Castle) you will not be sorry to find yourself. In spite of all that people may say about Green fields and the Country I was always of opinion t...

...Excerpt: Deceived in Friendship and Betrayed in Love.? Letter the First From Isabel to Laura How often, in answer to my repeated intreaties that you would give my Daughter a regular detail of the Misfortunes and Adventures of your Life, have you said ?No, my friend never will I comply with your r...

................ 92 THE FIRST ACT OF A COMEDY .............................................................................................. 93 A LETTER from a YOUNG LADY, whose feelings being too strong for her Judgement led her into the commission of Errors which her Heart disapproved. ............................................................................................

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Memorials and Other Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

........................................................................... 4 FROM THE AUTHOR, TO THE AMERICAN EDITOR OF HIS WORKS. ........................ ...pers MEMORIALS, AND OTHER PAPERS, VOL. I. BY THOMAS DE QUINCEY FR FR FR FR FROM OM OM OM OM THE A THE A THE A THE A THE AUTHOR, UTHOR, UTHOR, UTHOR, U... ... difficulty which in my own hands by too painful an experience I had found from nervous de- pression to be absolutely insurmountable; secondly, in hav... ... any, had been already tried for me vicariously amongst the Ameri- cans; a people so nearly repeating our own in style of intel- lect, and in the comp... ...rciful bloodshed”—In reading either the later religious wars of the Jewish people under the Maccabees, or the ear- lier under Joshua, every philosophi... ...s, it is painful to witness the childish state of feeling which the French people manifest on every possible question that connects itself at any poin... ... 1789, lost his father in early life. Inheriting from him a good estate in Aberdeenshire, and one more con- siderable in Jamaica, he found himself, at... ...st advantages of a finished education, studying first at the University of Aberdeen, and afterwards for two years at Oxford; whilst he had previously ...

...mely, first, in having brought together so widely scattered a collection--a difficulty which in my own hands by too painful an experience I had found from nervous depression to be absolutely insurmountable; secondly, in having made me a participator in the pecuniary profits of the American edition, without solicitation or the shadow of any expectation on my part, without a...

...ntents MEMORIALS, AND OTHER PAPERS, VOL. I. ....................................................................................................... 4 FROM THE AUTHOR, TO THE AMERICAN EDITOR OF HIS WORKS. .......................................................... 4 EXPLANATORY NOTICES..............................................................................................

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The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

By: Conan Doyle

.... They were admirable things for the observer — excellent for drawing the veil from men’s motives and actions. But for the trained reasoner to admit s... ...le memory. I had seen little of Holmes lately. My marriage had drifted us away from each other. My own complete happiness, and the home centred intere... ...d in our lodgings in Baker Street, buried among his old books, and alternating from week to week between cocaine and ambition, the drowsiness of the d... ...ation as I could desire about Miss Adler, to say nothing of half a dozen other people in the neighbourhood in whom I was not in the least interested, ... ...that. When you raise your cry of fire, it will be taken up by quite a number of people. You may then walk to the end of the street, and I will rejoin y... ...one direction and the loungers in the other, while a number of better dressed people, who had watched the scuffle without taking part in it, crowded i... ...le value which she had been expecting was waiting for her at the offices of the Aberdeen Shipping Company. Now, if you are well up in your London, you ... ...of preexisting cases which serves me so well. There was a parallel instance in Aberdeen some years back, and something on very much the same lines at ...

...ion. He never spoke of the softer passions, save with a gibe and a sneer. They were admirable things for the observer--excellent for drawing the veil from men?s motives and actions. But for the trained reasoner to admit such intrusions into his own delicate and finely adjusted temperament was to introduce a distracting factor which might throw a doubt upon all his mental r...

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Essays of Travel

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...o of the women wept. Any one who had come aboard might have supposed we were all absconding from the law. There was scarce a word interchanged, and no... ...table and that of the true steerage passenger was the table itself, and the crockery plates from which we ate. But lest I should show myself ungratefu... ...ical disparity; and even by the pal- ate I could distinguish a smack of snuff in the former from a flavour of boiling and dish-cloths in the second. A... ...ily men broken by adversity, elderly youths who had failed to place themselves in life, and people who had seen better days. Mildness was the prevaili... ...re a shipful of failures, the broken men of England. Yet it must not be supposed that these people exhibited depression. The scene, on the contrary, w... ...s Stevenson the reply, indicating, I fancy, a shade of difference in the social scale. When people pass each other on the high seas of life at so earl... ...as it was told me, and it was told me for a fact. A man fell from a housetop in the city of Aberdeen, and was brought into hospital with broken bones....

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Prince Otto a Romance 1905 Edition

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...as far gone in the respectable stages of antiquity and seemed indissoluble from the green garden in which it stood, and that yet was a sea-traveller i... ...ther in those days the story of Braddock, and how, as he was carried dying from the scene of his defeat, he promised himself to do better another time... ...n Monterey, charged with tender greetings. Pray you, take him in. He comes from a house where (even as in your own) there are gathered together some o... ...Bohemia, celebrated for its flowers and mountain bears, and inhabited by a people of singular simplicity and ten- derness of heart. Several intermarri... ...f the two) it was already so far forward in the spring, that when mountain people heard horns echoing all day about the north-west corner of the princ... ... old man, nodding, ‘a very pleasant state, and a fine race, both pines and people. We reckon ourselves part Grunewalders here, lying so near the borde... ...id the 145 Robert Louis Stevenson Colonel. ‘I was well grounded indeed at Aberdeen. And as for this matter of forgiveness, it comes, sir, of loose vi...

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Of Human Bondage

By: Somerset Maugham

..., darling?” she said. Her voice was so weak that it seemed to come already from a great distance. The child did not answer, but smiled comfortably. He... ...him, poor child?” The monthly nurse tried to quiet her , and pres- ently , from exhaustion, the crying ceased. The doctor walked to a table on the oth... ... body of a still-born child. He lifted the towel and looked. He was hidden from the bed by a screen, but the woman guessed what he was doing. “ Was it... ... be fortified for the evening service. V PHILIP CAME gradually to know the people he was to live with, and by fragments of conversation, some of it no... ...nd the little harbor were shabby streets in which lived fishermen and poor people; but since they went to chapel they were of no account. When Mrs. Ca... ...ften sang still when there was a tea-party at the vicarage. There were few people whom the Careys cared to ask there, and their parties consisted alwa... ...shed. She had a funny way at times of holding her head on one side like an Aberdeen puppy. She was sitting in an upright chair, sewing, for she had no...

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A Legend of Montrose

By: Sir Walter Scott

...umanity of one of the Drummonds, who received him in his arms as he leaped from amongst the flames. As King James IV . ruled with more activity than m... ...he romance, she roamed a raving maniac, and for some time secreted herself from all living society. Some re- maining instinctive feeling brought her a... ...me re- maining instinctive feeling brought her at length to steal a glance from a distance at the maidens while they milked the cows, which being obse... ...domination, had fired the train, by attempting to impose upon the Scottish people church ceremonies foreign to their habits and opinions. The success ... ...han to carry the learning whilk I had acquired at the Mareschal-College of Aberdeen, my gentle bluid and designation of Drumthwacket, together with a ... ... my lord, as a true Scottish man, and educated at the Mareschal-College of Aberdeen, I was bound to uphold the mass to be an act of blinded papistry a... ...allowances unchallengeable; but then, sir, they are a preceese, scrupulous people, and will allow nothing for peccadilloes. So that if a boor complain... ... sir, you know the nature of our Highlanders. I will not deny them to be a people stout in body and valiant in heart, and courageous enough in their o... ... while he filled a place at the bursar’s table at the Mareschal-College of Aberdeen; when,” said he; “if you did not move your jaws as fast as a pair ...

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My Bondage and My Freedom by Frederick Douglass. With an Introduction. By James M'Cune Smith

By: Frederick Douglas

...y a principle essential to Christianity, a PERSON is eternally differenced from a THING; so that the idea of a HUMAN BEING, necessarily excludes the i... ...F THE RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES OF AN AFFLICTED, DESPISED AND DEEPLY OUT- RAGED PEOPLE, BY RANKING SLAVERY WITH PI- RACY AND MURDER, AND BY DENYING IT EITH... ...al plea—”not guilty;” the case must, therefore, proceed. Any facts, either from slaves, slaveholders, or by-standers, calculated to enlighten the publ... ... to do it. Not only is slavery on trial, but unfortunately, the en- slaved people are also on trial. It is alleged, that they are, naturally, inferior... ...wrongs, and do not apprehend their rights. Looking, then, at your request, from this stand-point, and wishing every- thing of which you think me capab... ...- thing of which you think me capable to go to the benefit of my afflicted people, I part with my doubts and hesitation, and proceed to furnish you th... ...indig- nantly cried out, from Greenock to Edinburgh, and from Edinburgh to Aberdeen. George Thompson, of London, Henry C. Wright, of the United States...

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The Silverado Squatters

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...an Coast Range, none of its near neighbours rising to one-half its altitude. It looks down on much green, intricate country. It feeds in the spring- t... ...Bucks, and bears, and rattle-snakes, and former mining operations, are the staple of men’s talk. Agriculture has only begun to mount above the valley.... ... site of sleepy Calistoga; yet in the mean time, around the foot of that 4 mountain the silence of nature reigns in a great m... ...f nature reigns in a great mea- sure unbroken, and the people of hill and valley go sauntering about their business as in the days before the flood. T... ...d a theory of his own, which I did not quite grasp, except that the trees had not “grewed” there. But he mentioned, with evident pride, that he differ... ...an. It is no tie of faith, for we detest each other’s errors. And yet somewhere, deep down in the heart of each one of us, something yearns for the ol... ... dozen times behind the plate. “Hullo, sir!” I cried. “Where are you going?” He turned round without a quiver. “You’re a Scotchman, sir?” he said grav... ...,” as he said; and took himself solemnly away, radiating dirt and humbug as he went. A month or two after this encounter of mine, there came a Scot to...

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A Child's History of England

By: Charles Dickens

...ea was not alive, then, with great ships and brave sailors, sailing to and from all parts of the world. It was very lonely. The Is lands lay solitary... ... nothing of them. It is supposed that the Phoenicians, who were an ancient people, famous for carrying on trade, came A Child’s Histroy of England 8... ...iling over to the opposite coasts of France and Belgium, and saying to the people there, ‘We have been to those white cliffs across the water, which y... ...hose white cliffs across the water, which you can see in fine weather, and from that country, which is called Britain, we bring this tin and lead,’ te... ...nd lead,’ tempted some of the French and Belgians to come over also. These people settled themselves on the south coast of England, which is now calle... ...ved that part of the Is lands. It is probable that other people came over from Spain to Ireland, and settled there. Thus, by little and little, stran... ... arm was sent to Newcastle, his left arm to Berwick, his legs to Perth and Aberdeen. But, if King Edward had had his body cut into inches, and had sen...

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The Confessions

By: J. J. Rousseau

... sense of honour and independence, and an obstinate refusal to take advice from those who really wished to befriend him; nor should it be forgotten th... ...The apostle of affliction, he who threw Enchantment over passion, and from woe Wrung overwhelming eloquence, first drew 5 Rousseau The... ...n its shadows and blemishes; let us not, then, seek to “draw his frailties from their dread abode.” His greatest fault was his renunciation of a fathe... ...ains, lakes and islands, formerly regarded with aversion, into a fairyland peopled with crea- tures whose joys and sorrows appealed irresistibly to ev... ... my eyes only examples of mildness, and was surrounded by some of the best people in the world? My father, my aunt, my nurse, my relations, our friend... ...y Latin, history, and antiquities; I could hardly recol- lect whether such people as Romans ever existed. When I visited my father, he no longer behel... ...leasure as I received from it. He determined to reside at Keith Hall, near Aberdeen, and I was to join him as soon as he was settled there: but this p...

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The Uncommercial Traveller

By: Charles Dickens

...n the United Kingdom greatly cares for my opinion of its brandy or sherry. When I go upon my jour- neys, I am not usually rated at a low figure in the... ... I travel for the great house of Human Interest Brothers, and have rather a large connection in the fancy goods way. Literally speaking, I am always w... ...been for some two hours and a half; there was a slight obstruction in the sea within a few yards of my feet: as if the stump of a tree, with earth eno... ...f as being then beside me, that I had purposed to myself to see, when I left home for Wales. I had heard of that clergy- man, as having buried many sc... ...the way was steep, and a horse and cart (in which it was wrapped in a sheet) were necessary, and three or four men, and, all things considered, it was... ... day; the beneficent Earth had already absorbed it. The drowned were buried in their clothes. T o supply the great sudden demand for coffins, he had g... ...ost any important town on the continent of Europe—I find very striking after an absence of any dura- tion in foreign parts. London is shabby in contra...

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Waverley or Tis Sixty Years Since

By: Sir Walter Scott

... the Quarterly Review, in 1817. The particulars were derived by the Critic from the Author’s information. Afterwards they were published in the Prefac... ...principles, that while the civil war was raging, and strag- gling officers from the Highland army were executed with- out mercy, Invernahyle hesitated... ... At length Colonel Whitefoord applied to the Duke of Cumberland in person. From him, also, he received a posi- tive refusal. He then limited his reque... ...w and foolish fashion is introduced to break the natural dependence of the people upon their landlords.’ Sir Everard had done his best to correct this... ...isaffected, and, showed little hospitality to the military guests; and the people of the town, chiefly engaged in mercantile pursuits, were not such a... ...us ease at home, look out for amusement abroad. Yet the physiognomy of the people, when more closely examined, was far from exhibiting the indifferenc... ... aboon the Pass.’ ‘Ye’re a Highlandman by your tongue?’ ‘Na; I am but just Aberdeen-a-way.’ ‘ And did your master come frae Aberdeen wi’ you?’ ‘Aye—th... ...f each other, so that he fairly gave us the slip, and marched northward to Aberdeen, leaving the Low Country open and undefended. Not to lose so favou... ...ad received no- tice that the army of the Government, arriving by sea from Aberdeen, had landed at Dunbar, and quartered the night be- fore to the wes...

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The Warden

By: Anthony Trollope

... being also warden of the almshouses, if the bishop in each case approved. From that day to this the charity had gone on and pros- pered —at least, th... ...red with rows of houses; the value of the property had gradually increased from year to year and century to cen- tury, and was now presumed by those w... ...ral a steward. For many, many years—records hardly tell how many, probably from the time when Hiram’s wishes had been first fully carried out—the proc... ...toll, then brought an action against the gate- keeper, and proved that all people coming up a certain by-lane, and going down a certain other by-lane,... ...y personally, that arose from there not being room in the hospital for two people so much alike as the doctor and himself, rather than from any dissim... ...e continued—’ We must be doing something, you know; we mustn’t allow these people to cut the ground from under us while we sit looking on. ’ The archd... ... on the name of Lord John Russell; or, my brother, at your advice, on Lord Aberdeen; or, my cousin, on Lord Derby, at yours; being, with my parched to...

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Guy Mannering

By: Sir Walter Scott

...d now about to come into this busy and changeful world. I will not conceal from you that I am skilful in understanding and interpreting the movements ... ... the family. He hastened to draw the stranger into a private room. “I fear from your looks,” said the father, “that you have bad tidings to tell me of... ...hip in the Temple by his parents. You must regard him as a being separated from the rest of the world. In childhood, in boyhood, you must sur- round h... ...n predicted by the Astrologer; and thus his confi- dence, which, like most people of the period, he had freely given to the science, was riveted and c... ...prevail on her to accept so much as a single guinea. “I have heard the old people at Jedburgh say, that all Jean’s sons were condemned to die there on... ...quipt in a habit which mingled the national dress of the Scottish com- mon people with something of an Eastern costume, she spun a thread, drawn from ... ...ortmain is in Scotland termed a mortifi- cation, and in one great borough (Aberdeen, if I remember rightly) there is a municipal officer who takes car...

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Redgauntlet

By: Sir Walter Scott

...y prince are those painfully evinc- ing a broken heart, which seeks refuge from its own thoughts in sordid enjoyments. Still, however, it was long ere... ...auntlet be, perhaps it was long ere he altogether became, so much degraded from his original self; as he enjoyed for a time the lustre attending the p... ...so prudent as to be aware their complaints would meet with little sympathy from the world. It may be added, that the greater part of the banished Jaco... ...you will say. He lays the blame of former inaccuracies on evil company—the people who were at the livery-stable were too seductive, I suppose—he denie... ...hich he wished to attain, by preserving me from the society of other young people, that, upon my word, I am always rather astonished how I should have... ...nd, that though there is as great a difference between thee and one of our people as there is between a lion and a sheep, yet I know and believe thou ... ...se good folks, Alan, make no allowance for what your good father calls the Aberdeen-man’s privilege, of ‘taking his word again;’ or what the wise call... ..., the countersign, ‘Not light enough to land a cargo.’ ‘Then plague of all Aberdeen Almanacks!’ ‘And plague of all fools that waste time,’ said Thomas...

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Memories and Portraits

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...LUME OF PAPERS, unconnected as they are, it will be better to read through from the beginning, rather than dip into at random. A certain thread of mea... ...one on France by the diabolically clever Mr. Hillebrand, may well have set people thinking on the divisions of races and nations. Such thoughts should... ...th particular congru- ity and force to inhabitants of that United Kingdom, peopled from so many different stocks, babbling so many different dialects,... ...cular congru- ity and force to inhabitants of that United Kingdom, peopled from so many different stocks, babbling so many different dialects, and off... ...ny different dialects, and offering in its extent such singular contrasts, from the busiest over-population to the unkindliest desert, from the Black ... ...h and Glasgow, or of dialect as in the hundred miles between Edinburgh and Aberdeen. Book English has gone round the world, but at home we still prese... ...re is one country, for instance – its frontier not so far from London, its people closely akin, its language the same in all essentials with the Engli... ... Rock, in the fog, when the Smeaton had drifted from her moorings, and the Aberdeen men, pick in hand, had seized upon the only boats, and he must sto...

... by the biggin? o?t.? Two recent books* one by Mr. Grant White on England, one on France by the diabolically clever Mr. Hillebrand, may well have set people thinking on the divisions of races and nations. Such thoughts should arise with particular congruity and force to inhabitants of that United Kingdom, peopled from so many different stocks, babbling so many different di...

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Howards End

By: E. M. Forster

...he dear knows what will happen when Paul (younger son) arrives to- morrow. From hall you go right or left into dining- room or drawing-room. Hall itse... ...he house really, but it’s all that one notices—nine windows as you look up from the front garden. “Then there’s a very big wych-elm—to the left as you... ... life and sometimes only a drama, and one must learn to distinguish tother from which, and up to now I have always put that down as ‘Meg’s clever non-... ... from poetry, or you. Anyhow, it’s been knocked into pieces, and, like all people who are really strong, Mr. Wilcox did it without hurting me. On the ... ...ise. What do you think of the Wilcoxes? Are they our sort? Are they likely people? Could they appre- ciate Helen, who is to my mind a very special sor... ...id anything of that sort to the Wilcoxes. I under- stand it, but most good people would think you mad. Imagine how disconcerting for Helen! What is wa... ...go to that sort of thing. But she hasn’t the time. She’s taken to breeding Aberdeen terriers— jolly little dogs.” “I expect we’d better be doing the s...

...and altogether delightful--red brick. We can scarcely pack in as it is, and the dear knows what will happen when Paul (younger son) arrives tomorrow. From hall you go right or left into diningroom or drawing-room. Hall itself is practically a room. You open another door in it, and there are the stairs going up in a sort of tunnel to the first-floor. Three bed-rooms in a ro...

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The Poems of Samuel Taylor Coleridge

By: Samuel Taylor Coleridge

... . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Pain . . . . . . 23 On a Lady Weeping: Imitation from the Latin of Nicolaus Archius . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Mo... ...tten After a Walk Before Supper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Imitated from Ossian . . . . . . . . . . . 53 The Complaint of Ninathóma: From th... ...he House of the ‘‘Man of Ross’’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Imitated from the Welsh . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Lines: To a Beautiful Spring i... ...Poet in the Clouds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 404 The Tears of a Grateful People . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 406 Hymn . . . . . . . . .... ...y or the tranquil sky! One of the People. - 103 - Sonnets on Eminent Characters: Contributed to the ‘‘Morn... ...ainst you from the Holy One! But o’er some plain that steameth to the sun, Peopled with Death; or where more hideous Trade Loud-laughing packs his ... ...tis fenced round with irons sharp, spear-like, and strong. This fellow from Aberdeen hither did skip With a waxy face and a blubber lip, And a blac...

...dy on the Death of Chatterton, 16 -- An Invocation, 19 -- Anna and Harland, 20 -- To the Evening Star, 21 -- Pain, 22 -- On a Lady Weeping: Imitation from the Latin of Nicolaus Archius, 23 -- Monody on a Tea-kettle, 24 -- Genevieve, 26 -- On Receiving an Account that his Only Sister?s Death was Inevitable, 27 -- On Seeing a Youth Affectionately Welcomed by a Sister, 28 -- ...

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Bride of Lammermoor

By: Sir Walter Scott

...MMERMOOR THE AUTHOR, on a former occasion, declined giving the real source from which he drew the tragic subject of this history, because, though occu... ...oor, the Author feels himself now at liberty to tell the tale as he had it from connexions of his own, who lived very near the period, and were closel... ...t purchased the tem- 4 Bride of Lammermoor poral prosperity of her family from the Master whom she served under a singular condition, which is thus n... ...sation of that clamour to which it had so lately echoed. But its space was peopled by phantoms which the imagination of the young heir conjured up bef... ...ings are arming, T aste not when the wine-cup glistens, Speak not when the people listens, Stop thine ear against the singer, From the red gold keep t... ..., when the yeoman’s song had died on the wind, “ever served the Ravenswood people, that he seems so much interested in them? I suppose you know, Lucy,... ...ght comes from, and where, as I judge, they are now singing ‘Cauld Kail in Aberdeen,’ ye may do your master’s errand about the venison, and I will do ... ...ike to be cauld eneugh too,” he reflected, as the chorus of “Cauld Kail in Aberdeen” again reached his ears. The minister—he had got his presentation ...

...Excerpt: Introduction to the bride of Lammermoor. The author, on a former occasion, declined giving the real source from which he drew the tragic subject of this history, because, though occurring at a distant period, it might possibly be unpleasing to the feelings of the descendants of the parties. But as he finds an account of the circum...

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Speeches: Literary and Social

By: Charles Dickens

...of his enthusiasm, and kindled at his example. But ev ery word which fell from his lips, and every demonstration of sympathy and approbation with whi... ...d together in inseparable connexion, and that I had never known them apart from you. Speeches: Literary and Social 7 It is a difficult thing for a ma... ...clusion of the story, I daily received letters of remonstrance, especially from the ladies. God bless them for their tender mercies! The Profes sor w... ...out a thrill of gratitude and pleasure. I shall love while I have life her people, her hills, and her houses, and even the very stones of her streets.... ...—to ap peal as a stranger to your generosity and kindness as the fre est people on the earth—I could, putting some restraint upon myself, stand amon... ...—have come with all my sympathies clustering as richly about this land and people—with all my sense of jus tice as keenly alive to their high claims ... ... of the great public, than the great public, on their road from Torquay to Aberdeen, can do without them. Therefore, I desire to ask the public whethe...

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The Longest Journey

By: E. M. Forster

...e streams? Rickie rebuked his own groveling soul, and turned his eyes away from the night, which had led him to such absurd conclusions. The fire was ... ...with a merry don and had tasted Zwieback biscuits; then he had walked with people he liked, and had walked just long 6 The Longest Journey enough; an... ...ust long 6 The Longest Journey enough; and now his room was full of other people whom he liked, and when they left he would go and have supper with A... ...e. The door opened. A tall young woman stood framed in the light that fell from the passage. “Ladies!” whispered every-one in great agitation. “Yes?” ... ...et me introduce Miss Pem- broke—don’t all go!” For his friends were flying from his visitor like mists before the sun. “Oh, Agnes, I am so sorry; I’ve... ...s, which Agnes, who had never been to Venice, took to be Venice, but which people who had been to Stockholm knew to be Stockholm. Rickie’s mother, loo... ... pardon, miss, but might I ask how many to lay?” It was the bedmaker, Mrs. Aberdeen. “Three, I think,” said Agnes, smiling pleasantly. “Mr. Elliot’ll ... ...ock is sopping. No, you don’t!” She twitched the tongs away from him. Mrs. Aberdeen, without speaking, fetched a pair of Rickie’s socks and a pair of ... ...w he’s gone to get some dinner, and I can’t think why he isn’t back.” Mrs. Aberdeen left them. “He wants pulling up sharply. There is nothing original...

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The Varieties of Religious Experience

By: William James

...emn emo- tion— Its ability to overcome unhappiness— Need of such a faculty from the biological point of view. LECTURE III THE REALITY OF THE UNSEEN Pe... ...logy— Does transcendental idealism fare better? Its principles— Quotations from John Caird— They are good as restatements of religious experience, but... ...arned au- dience. To us Americans, the experience of receiving instruction from the living voice, as well as from the books, of European scholars, is ... ...catory words. Let me say only this, that now that the current, here and at Aberdeen, has begun to run from west to east, I hope it may continue to do ... ...nging places with Scotsmen lecturing in the United States; I hope that our people may become in all these higher mat- ters even as one people; and tha... ...f lowly origin be asserted is seen in those comments which unsenti- mental people so often pass on their more sentimen- 19 William James tal acquaint... ...ing persons whose states of mind we regard as overstrained. But when other people criticize our own more exalted soul-flights by calling them ‘nothing... ...85; in his Conception of God, New York and London, 1897; and lately in his Aberdeen Gifford Lectures, The World and the Individual, 2 vols., New York ...

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Records of a Family of Engineers

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...tevensoun, Stevensonne, Stenesone, and Stewinsoune, spread across Scotland from the mouth of the Firth of Forth to the mouth of the Firth of Clyde. Fo... ...er-Clerk to the Privy Council, and liked being so extremely. I gather this from his conduct in September 1681, when, with all the lords and their serv... ...ack in my father’s garden, and a whole February in the open fields not far from Camragen, and this I did without the least prejudice from the night ai... ...read than the text indicates, and occurs from Dumfries and Berwickshire to Aberdeen and Orkney. 9 Records of a Family of Engineers scribed of the cla... ...inburgh Spearman, were in court, he must have been tempted to applaud. The people of that land were his abhorrence; he loathed Buonaparte like An- tic... ... ask the bereaved family to seek her a new place. It is extraordinary that people should have been so deceived in so careless an impostor; that a few ... ...od men. The natives of London are in general not so tall and strong as the people of Edinburgh, because they have not so much pure air, and instead of... ...tars, and the morning was ushered in with the song of many little birds.’ ‘Aberdeen, July 19 th . ‘I hope, my dear, that you are going out of doors re... ... four new lights formed the extent of their intentions – Kinnaird Head, in Aberdeenshire, at the east- ern elbow of the coast; North Ronaldsay, in Ork...

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Life of Johnson

By: James Boswell

...of growing enlightenment and happy compan- ionship, and an innocent refuge from the cares and perturbations of life. Princeton, June 28, 1917. INTRODU... ...ect and setting are so closely allied that each borrows charm and emphasis from the other. Let the devoted reader of Boswell ask himself what glamor w... ...ther. Let the devoted reader of Boswell ask himself what glamor would fade from the church of St. Clement Danes, from the Mitre, from Fleet Street, th... ..., such as ‘love’ and ‘hate,’ and vast is the number, range, and variety of people who at one time or another had been in some degree personally relate... ...godchild Jane Langton. ‘Sir,’ said he, ‘I love the acquain- tance of young people, . . . young men have more virtue than old men; they have more gen- ... ... into a spacious and genial world. The reader there meets a vast number of people, men, women, children, nay even ani- mals, from George the Third dow... ...e few more are of the list. I am told that one gentle- man in the shire of Aberdeen, viz. Sir Archibald Grant, has planted above fifty millions of tre... ...ff.”’ Johnson. ‘Knitting of stockings is a good amusement. As a freeman of Aberdeen I should be a knitter of stockings.’ He asked me to go down with h...

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Heartbreak House : A Fantasia in the Russian Manner on English Themes

By: George Bernard Shaw

...e broad awake. Tchekov, more of a fatalist, had no faith in these charming people extricating themselves. They would, he thought, be sold up and sent ... ... hunting, shooting, fishing, flirting, eating, and drinking. The same nice people, the same utter futility. The nice people could read; some of them c... ...r any chance of sharing or influencing their activi- ties. But they shrank from that contact. They hated politics. They did not wish to realize Utopia... ...t. They hated politics. They did not wish to realize Utopia for the common people: they wished to realize their favorite fictions and poems in their o... ...cs). It is true that the two establishments got mixed at the edges. Exiles from the library, the music room, and the picture gallery would be found la... ... incredible ignorance of modern thought and political science but upstarts from the counting-house, who had spent their lives furnishing their pockets... ...id it was only a silly fancy of my own. MRS HUSHABYE. Hm! Is he one of the Aberdeen Darnleys? ELLIE. Nobody knows. Just fancy! He was found in an an- ...

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The $30,000 Bequest : And Other Stories

By: Mark Twain

.................................... ...................... 190 A HUMANE WORD FROM SATAN ................................................................... ......................................................... ...... 210 EXTRACTS FROM ADAM’S DIARY ............................................................ .......................... ...................................... 231 Extract from Adam’s Diary ............................................................ ...bought another acre or two and sold the most of it at a profit to pleasant people who were willing to build, and would be good neighbors and furnish a... ...llars!” All day long the music of those inspiring words sang through those people’s heads. From his marriage day forth, Aleck’s grip had been upon the... ...uld you wanting to talk in that dreadful way? How would you like to have people talk so about you, and you not cold yet?” “Not likely to be, for o... ... Higgins. This was in the eleventh century, when our people were living in Aberdeen, county of Cork, England. Why it is that our long line has ever si...

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The Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson to His Family and Friends ; Selected and Edited with Notes and Introd. By Sidney Colvin : Volume 1

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...hope you will find your house at Mentone nice. I have been obliged to stop from writing by the want of a pen, but now I have one, so I will con- tinue... ...se of justice forbids the receipt of less – than half-a- crown. – Greeting from, Sir, your most affectionate and needy son, R. STEVENSON. Letter: TO M... ...enness of a tree. The southerly heights, when I came here, were black with people, fishers waiting on wind and night. Now all the S.Y .S. (Stornoway b... ... tribe of gipsies. The men are always drunk, simply and truthfully always. From morning to evening the great villainous-looking fellows are either sle... ...ny drunk men, and a double supply of po- lice. I saw them sent for by some people and enter an inn, in a pretty good hurry: what it was for I do not k... ...s a word could I understand of his answer. What is still worse, I find the people here-about – that is to say, 6 The Letters of R. L. Stevenson: V ol... ...nd what she says! But she speaks Davos language, which is to Ger- man what Aberdeen-awa’ is to English, so it comes heavy. God bless you, my dear Cumm...

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Framley Parsonage

By: Anthony Trollope

...aped upon this young man’s head. His first step forward in life had arisen from his having been sent, while still very young, as a private pupil to th... ...de; and it ended in Mark going back to Exeter with a letter full of praise from the widowed peeress. She had been delighted, she said, in having such ... ... means inclined to throw away any advantage which might arise to his child from such a friend- 4 Framley Parsonage ship. When, therefore, the young l... ... assistance. And Lord Lufton was there of course; and 8 Framley Parsonage people protested that he would surely fall in love with one of the four bea... ... You know I don’t mean it. But Lady Lufton does not like those Chaldicotes people. You know Lord Lufton was with you the last time you were there; and... ...and then. And as I was invited there, especially to preach while all these people are staying at the place, I could not well refuse. ’ And then he got... ...rd Palmerston. Indeed, she had had but little faith in that war after Lord Aberdeen had been expelled. If, indeed, Lord Derby could have come in! But ...

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Great Expectations

By: Charles Dickens

... my first fancies regarding what they were like, were unreasonably derived from their tombstones. The shape of the letters on my father’s, gave me an ... ... an odd idea that he was a square, stout, dark man, with curly black hair. From the character and turn of the in- scription, “ Also Georgiana Wife of ... ...he low leaden line beyond, was the river; and that the distant savage lair from which the wind was rushing, was the sea; and that the small bundle of ... ...ds, he looked in my young eyes as if he were eluding the hands of the dead people, stretching up cautiously out of their graves, to get a twist upon h... ... said she, “I didn’t bring you up 14 Great Expectations by hand to badger people’s lives out. It would be blame to me, and not praise, if I had. Peop... ...nce that time, which is far enough away now, I have often thought that few people know what secrecy there is in the young, under terror. No matter how... ...’s Gate, and we were in among the tiers of shipping. Here, were the Leith, Aberdeen, and Glasgow steam- ers, loading and unloading goods, and looking ...

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