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Records: 21 - 40 of 81 - Pages: 
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The Confidence- Man

By: Herman Melville

...ken old mole- skin, stretched out, an invalid, on a bare plank in the emi- grants’ quarters, eagerly clinging to life and lucre, though the one was ga... ... not to afford handles to those unblessed with the true light. For, but to grant that there was so much as a mystery about such a case, might by those... ... wise; not in vain have you suffered. That little you ask, I think, can be granted. But remember, not in a day, nor a week, nor perhaps a month, but s... ... the facts how they may, your reflections are none the less unwarrantable. Grant, for the moment, that your experiences are as you give them; in which... ...r pain nor tickle.” “T o mere reason, your case looks something piteous, I grant. But never despond; many things—the choicest—yet remain. You breathe ... ...ow one—to use presently, when wanted— from the horticultural kingdom. Some bud, lily-bud, if you please. Now, such points as the new-born man-child ha... ... are, but, likewise—now our horticultural im- age comes into play—like the bud of the lily, he contains concealed rudiments of others; that is, points... ... the baggage-room; and inside, white and virgin as the hearts of lilies in bud.” “So it is, so it is,” said the old man sadly, his attention for the f...

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The Prince and the Page

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

...imon were he at the ends of the earth. Or if not, that poor child would be granted to any needy kinsman or grasping baron that Edward wanted to portio... ...en be growing out of a mere toy. Or might not his services win him a fresh grant of the earldom, and could he not then prove his sincerity by laying i... ...d of Lancaster rather than Charles of Anjou had been able to make good the grant from the Pope. Splendid were the displays, and no slight toil did the... ... 102 The Prince and the Page a gesture of entreaty. “So please your Grace, grant me a few farther words. I sware, and truly, that I had heard nothing ... ...the Pope, said there was as little hope of pardon as that his staff should bud and blossom; and lo, in one night it bore bud and flower. I besought hi... ...that the pardon that takes away the sin of the world, will take away mine. Grant me Absolution.’ He was with us when, ere dawn, such of us as still li...

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Typee a Romance of the South Seas

By: Herman Melville

...ke rubies upon a fibre of tappa, or displayed in their ears a single white bud, the stem thrust backward through the aperture, and showing in front th... ...ey are cannibals!’ said T oby on one occasion when I eulogized the tribe. ‘Granted,’ I replied, ‘but a more hu- mane, gentlemanly and amiable set of e... ...rs in plait- ing grass-mats. The girls anointed themselves with their fra- grant oils, dressed their hair, or looked over their curious finery, and co... ... equity. There was no municipal police for the purpose of apprehending va- grants and disorderly characters. In short, there were no le- gal provision... ...xed and serious eye, but at length yielding to my importunity, reluctantly granted my request. Accompanied by some fifty of the natives, I now rapidly... ...as unsuccessful, and I immediately perceived what had in- duced Mow-Mow to grant my request, and why the other natives conducted themselves in so stra...

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Agnes Grey

By: Anne Brontë

...h upon the matter; and once I heard her whisper as she left the room, ‘God grant he be not disap- pointed! I know not how he would bear it.’ Disappoin... ...d; but I thought it my absolute duty to crush this vicious tendency in the bud: and 26 Agnes Grey so it was, if I could have done it; and had my powe... ...e a home too, if he pleases; and, doubtless, he will please some time. God grant the partner of that home may be wor- thy of his choice, and make it a... ... men if you don’t. You cannot be so cruel as to deny me a favour so easily granted and yet so highly prized!’ pleaded he as ardently as if his life de... ...ossible that God may hear my prayers, disperse these gloomy shad- ows, and grant me some beams of heaven’s sunshine yet? Will He entirely deny to me t... ... I, ‘now that he has a good master; I’m quite satisfied.’ ‘You take it for granted that I am a good one, then?’ The man and the dog departed, and I re...

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The Two Gentlemen of Verona

By: William Shakespeare

... not be chronicled for wise. PROTEUS: Yet writers say, as in the sweetest bud The eating canker dwells, so eating love Inhabits in the finest wits of... ...n the finest wits of all. VALENTINE: And writers say, as the most forward bud Is eaten by the canker ere it blow, Even so by love the young and tende... ...en so by love the young and tender wit Is turn d to folly, blasting in the bud, Losing his verdure even in the prime And all the fair effects of futur... ...love amends. For me, by this pale queen of night I swear, I am so far from granting thy request That I despise thee for thy wrongful suit, And by and ... ...to chide myself Even for this time I spend in talking to thee. PROTEUS: I grant, sweet love, that I did love a lady; But she is dead. JULIA: [Aside]... ...e gift hath made me happy. I now beseech you, for your daughter s sake, To grant one boom that I shall ask of you. DUKE: I grant it, for thine own, w...

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Adventures in the South Seas

By: Herman Melville

...g a fine time of it for the rest of their days, thus cruelly nipped in the bud. Soon after, the canoe came alongside. In it were eight or ten natives,... ... of the fraternity, no member was allowed to ship on board a vessel unless granted permis- sion by the rest. In this way the gang controlled the port,... ...ter she was; not more than fourteen; with the most delightful shape—like a bud just blown; and large hazel eyes. They called her Loo; a name rather p... ...oon set; and with the early breath of the tropical morning, fresh and fra- grant from the hillsides, we slowly glided down the bay, and were swept thr...

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Night and Day

By: Virginia Woolf

...ion, until, as the years wore on, the privileges of her lot were taken for granted, and certain drawbacks made themselves very manifest. Perhaps it is... ...es.” 61 Virginia Woolf “You’d be bored to death in a year’s time.” “Oh, I grant you I should be bored if I did nothing. But I should write plays.” “H... ...ry to come, I’m sure I don’t know. And the less talk there is the better.” Granting the assumption that gentlemen of sixty who are highly cultivated, ... ...he’s been going about all these years, pretending, letting one take it for granted, that he was single. And the poor deserted little wife—” “She is no... ...be content to remain silent for ever if a share of personal happiness were granted her. She read Mr. Clacton’s statement with a cu- rious division of ... ...he dead leaves, the withered bracken, the dry and discolored grass, but no bud would be broken, nor 342 Night and Day would the new stalks that showe...

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Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit

By: Charles Dickens

... admonition that it is not to her more sensitive and joyous favourites she grants the longest term of life. Still athwart their darker boughs, the sun... ...y would have been in almost as bad a plight as the unfortunate poorer emi- grants, who (seduced on board by solemn advertisement) had been living on t... ...n’t think it.”— ”I ast your pardon, ma’am,” says Mrs Harris, “and I humbly grant your grace; for if ever a woman lived as would see her feller creetur... ...se open to the barber, but to go distracted himself, or to take Bailey for granted; and he wisely chose the latter. Mr Bailey was good enough to conti... ... was quite in his peculiar vein of humour. ‘Then,’ said Tigg Montague, ‘we grant annuities on the very low- est and most advantageous terms known in t... ...ttainable, as he knew it had been poor Merry’s mission to crush him in the bud. He was very frail and tearful; for being aware that a shepherd’s missi...

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The Old Curiosity Shop

By: Charles Dickens

...enting the old man upon her charms. ‘Such a fresh, blooming, modest little bud, neighbour, ’ said Quilp, nursing his short leg, and making his eyes tw... ...ch he bore so con spicuous a part, and seemed to nip his prospects in the bud. Having only received from Frederick Trent, late on the previous night,... ...dy children, brown as berries. The re quest was no sooner preferred, than granted. The el dest boy ran out to fetch some milk, the second dragged tw... ...as I told him “these are common faults.” “But he’s a scoundrel,” said he. “Granting that,” said I (for the sake of argument of course), “a great many ... ... affront to church and state, and savoured of revolutionary principles, to grant a half holiday upon any lighter occasion than the birthday of the Mo... ...aring she had com mitted some grievous fault. ‘I beg your pardon.’ It was granted immediately, though the lady still ap peared much ruffled and disc... ...stroke of five, he reappeared, and the office, as if by magic, became fra grant with the smell of gin and water and lemon peel. ‘Mr Richard, ’ said B... ...eer less region, where not a blade of grass was seen to grow, where not a bud put forth its promise in the spring, where nothing green could live but...

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David Copperfield Volume Two

By: Charles Dickens

... If the public felt that their wills were in safe keeping, and took it for granted that the office was not to be made better, who was the worse for it... ...th wind blew Dora, and the wild flowers in the hedges were all Doras, to a bud. My com- fort is, Miss Mills understood me. Miss Mills alone could ente... ... condition. That condition was, that he should make a solemn resolution to grant no more loans of his name, or anything else, to Mr. Micawber. My dea... ...ry en- ergy, to improve it. I am sure I shall improve it in time. Will you grant me time any length of time? We are both so young, sir, You are rig... ... pretty little Dora s face would fall, and she would make her mouth into a bud again, as if she would very much prefer to shut mine with a kiss. Woul... ...case where both parties were willing to agree to anything, she took it for granted there would be no difficulty in set- tling this point. Mr. Micawber... ...ee years afterwards. Three years had elapsed since the sailing of the emi- grant ship; when, at that same hour of sunset, and in the same place, I sto...

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Adam Bede

By: George Eliot

...t as a token that there may 30 Adam Bede be mercy in store for her.” “God grant it,” said Seth. “For I doubt Adam’s heart is so set on her, he’ll nev... ... and a sweet girl of seventeen trembles under our glance, as if she were a bud first opening her heart with wondering rapture to the morn- ing. Such y... ...e sin, the sorrow with which it was mingled, as the canker in a lily-white bud is more grievous to behold than in a common pot-herb. By the time Dinah... ...nd his younger brother. “My heart is knit to your aged mother since it was granted me to be near her in the day of trouble. Speak to her of me, and te... ...r brother—and yet not farewell. For those children of God whom it has been granted to see each other face to face, and to hold communion together, and... ...t possible. She never had a child. She can’t be guilty. Who says it?” “God grant she may be innocent, Adam. We can still hope she is.” “But who says s... ...unsel would have made if he had been allowed to speak for her—a favour not granted to criminals in those stern times. At last Adam lifted up his head,...

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The Winters Tale

By: William Shakespeare

...heartiness, from bounty, fertile bosom, And well become the agent; ‘t may, I grant; But to be paddling palms and pinching fingers, As now they are, an... ...be no more im portunate: ’tis a sickness denying thee any thing; a death to grant this. CAMILLO: It is fifteen years since I saw my country: though I... ...entler scion to the wildest stock, And make conceive a bark of baser kind By bud of nobler race: this is an art Which does mend nature, change it rath... ...of such affections, Step forth mine advocate; at your request My father will grant precious things as trifles. LEONTES: Would he do so, I’ld beg your ...

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Twelfth Night or What You Will

By: William Shakespeare

...my lord. She never told her love, But let concealment, like a worm i the bud, Feed on her damask cheek: she pined in thought, And with a green and ... ...Now, as thou lovest me, let me see his letter. Clown: Good Master Fabian, grant me another request. FABIAN: Any thing. Clown: Do not desire to see ... ...y tis not your seal, nor your invention: You can say none of this: well, grant it then And tell me, in the modesty of honor, Why you have given me s...

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The Ambassadors

By: Henry James

...n its cheek and absolutely no warrant but its splendid im- pudence. Let us grant then that the impudence is always there—there, so to speak, for grace... ...t matter? Surely not; we leave her condition out; we take it, that is, for granted. I see it, 57 Henry James her condition, as behind and beneath you... ... they thus seemed cynically clustered. Accordingly, since they took it for granted, they took for granted all that was in connexion with it taken for ... ...ly to escape it; 125 Henry James Strether put on him, by what he took for granted, the burden of proof of the contrary. This tone was so far suc- ces... ...as struck with the tact, the taste of her vagueness, which simply took for granted in him a sense of beautiful things. He was conscious of how much it... ...nothing whatever in common with what was now in the air. As a child, as a “bud,” and then again as a flower of expansion, Mamie had bloomed for him, f...

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One of Our Conquerors

By: George Meredith

... a bruise, he made a sacrifice of his native pride to his intellectual, in granting that he must have been shaken, so childishly did he continue think... ...ctising by day a demureness that yells with the cat of the tiles at night. Granting all that, it being a transient novelist’s business to please the l... ...is thought and out he came.’ One has, reluc- tantly with Victor Radnor, to grant, that when a man’s top- most unspoken thought is hit, he must be shar... ...h a distaste for the singular air of superiority in composure which it was granted to ma- demoiselle to wear with an unassailable reserve when the rou... ...ould not be delaying; the interview, dramatized by the father of the young bud of womanhood, would be taking place, and the entry into Lakelands calcu... ...ve scored their victories on the road of that index: nor has duration been granted them to behold the minute measure of value left even tangible after... ... propriety on our sensations and inner dreams, by petrifying in the tender bud of them. Colonel Corfe is the man to hear on such a theme. He is a colo... ...ces away to forests and nests. This little woman had the rosy-peeping June bud’s plump- ness. What of the man who refused to kiss her once? Cold antec...

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The History Of

By: H. G. Wells

... “Look at old Morrison’s dress-stuff windows! Tidy, taste- ful, correct, I grant you, but Bleak!” He let out the word reinforced to a shout; “Bleak!” ...

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Wuthering Heights

By: Emily Brontë

...can faishion to stand thear i’ idleness un war, when all on ‘ems goan out! Bud yah’re a nowt, and it’s no use talking—yah’ll niver mend o’yer ill ways... ... appetite!’ The little party recovered its equanimity at sight of the fra- grant feast. They were hungry after their ride, and easily con- soled, sinc... ...patience itsseln wi’ sich careless, offald craters—patience itsseln he is! Bud he’ll not be soa allus—yah’s see, all on ye! Yah mun’n’t drive him out ... ...sud more likker look for th’ horse,’ he replied. ‘It ‘ud be to more sense. Bud I can look for norther horse nur man of a neeght loike this—as black as... ...tree. ‘Winter is not here yet. There’s a little flower up yonder, the last bud from the multitude of bluebells that clouded those turf steps in July w... ...heerful and well?’ Edgar, though he felt for the boy, could not consent to grant his request; because he could not accompany Catherine. He said, in su... ...ld have gone to bed, he begged to sleep with Hareton, and his petition was granted for once. Catherine stole out before break of day. She dared not tr...

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The Early Short Fiction

By: Edith Wharton

...urnalistic sense is still susceptible enough—and the idea’s picturesque, I grant you: asking the man who proved your alibi to establish your guilt.” “... ... She excelled in the rare art of 74 Early Short Fiction taking things for granted, and Thursdale felt a pardonable pride in the thought that she owed... ...hat will do.” He turned impressively to Wyant. “Do you see the pomegranate bud in this rug? Place yourself there—keep your left foot on it, please. An...

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Of Human Bondage

By: Somerset Maugham

...s the sense of obliga- tion in those who receive favours than in those who grant them. Monsieur Ducroz appeared again five or six days later. He totte... ...not know his own mind. Though much under Hayward’s influence, he would not grant that indecision pointed to a charming sen- 158 Of Human Bondage siti... ... if I read it a dozen times. Y ou see, it seems to me, one’s like a closed bud, and most of what one reads and does has no effect at all; but there ar... ...dy . ” She spoke in such a hearty , friendly tone, tak- ing everything for granted, that Philip was deeply touched. He never expected people to be kin... ...nto months. The win- ter wore away , and in the parks the trees burst into bud and into leaf. A terrible lassitude settled upon Philip. Time was passi...

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The Portrait of a Lady

By: Henry James

...he first, to work but for a “living wage.” The living wage is the reader’s grant of the least possible quantity of attention required for consciousnes... ...omplacency the field of her own nature; she was in the habit of taking for granted, on scanty evi- dence, that she was right; she treated herself to o... ...e would be little hope of any great resistance. Ralph had always taken for granted that his father would survive him—that his own name would be the fi... ...issed them from his thoughts. He cared no more for them than for the rose- bud in his buttonhole. It is the good fortune of a man who for the greater ... ...e was well enough for a fanciful young woman who was able to take much for granted in him; but the reader has a right to a nearer and a clearer view. ... ... there was nothing cottony about Caspar Goodwood, and his friends took for granted that he would somehow and somewhere write himself in bigger letters...

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