World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

The Lost Books of the Bible and the Forgotten Books of Eden

Article Id: WHEBN0003330417
Reproduction Date:

Title: The Lost Books of the Bible and the Forgotten Books of Eden  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject:
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

The Lost Books of the Bible and the Forgotten Books of Eden

The Lost Books of the Bible and the Forgotten Books of Eden (1926) is a collection of 17th-century and 18th-century English translations of some Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and New Testament Apocrypha, some of which were assembled in the 1820s, and then republished with the current title in 1926.

Contents

  • History of the translations 1
  • Reprint editions 2
  • Contents of The Lost Books of the Bible 3
  • Contents of The Forgotten Books of Eden 4
  • References 5

History of the translations

Rutherford Hayes Platt, in the preface to his 1963 reprint of The Lost Books of the Bible and the Forgotten Books of Eden states:

"First issued in 1926, this is the most popular collection of apocryphal and pseudepigraphal literature ever published."

The translations were first published, under this title, by an unknown editor in The Lost Books of the Bible Cleveland 1926, but the translations had previously been published many times. The Lost Books of the Bible and the Forgotten Books of Eden is also published by A&B publishers group, with a black and white cover, and with black people as protagonists. This edition has an introduction to The Lost Books of the Bible by Dr. Frank Cane and is prefaced by R.H.P., Jr.(New York, January 1, 1926.) Also, at the front page of The Lost Book of the Bible, Dr. Talmage gives a commentary on this work.

The book is, essentially, a combined reprint of earlier works. The first half, Lost Books of the Bible, is an unimproved reprint of a book published by William Hone in 1820, titled The Apocryphal New Testament, itself a reprint of a translation of the Apostolic Fathers done in 1693 by William Wake, who later became the Archbishop of Canterbury, and a smattering of medieval embellishments on the New Testament, from a book published in 1736 by Jeremiah Jones (1693-1724). It must be conceded that, in the three centuries since these were originally published, a great deal more is known about the Apostolic Fathers (including a good deal of the original text that was not available in 1693) and New Testament apocrypha.

The second half of the book, The Forgotten Books of Eden, includes a translation originally published in 1882 of the "First and Second Books of Adam and Eve", translated first from ancient Ethiopic to German by Ernest Trumpp and then into English by Soloman Cesar Malan, and a number of items of Old Testament pseudepigrapha, such as reprinted in the second volume of R.H. Charles's Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old Testament (Oxford, 1913).

For more modern translations see the standard modern editions:

Reprint editions

  • The Lost Books of the Bible and the Forgotten Books of Eden (A & B Book Dist Inc, March 1994, ISBN 1-881316-63-7)
  • The Lost Books of the Bible (Testament, 1998, ISBN 0-517-27795-6)
  • The Forgotten Books of Eden (Alpha House, 1927, ISBN 0-517-30886-X, ISBN 1-56459-636-2, ISBN 0-529-03385-2).

Contents of The Lost Books of the Bible

{♦ = found in The Apostolic Fathers}

Contents of The Forgotten Books of Eden

References

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.