World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Allumwandlung

Article Id: WHEBN0000250598
Reproduction Date:

Title: Allumwandlung  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Glossary of chess problems, Chess/Did you know archive, Chess problems, Auw, Babson task
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Allumwandlung

Niels Høeg, 1905
a b c d e f g h
8
a7 white rook
e6 black king
f6 white pawn
g6 white pawn
d5 black pawn
e5 black pawn
f5 black pawn
d4 white bishop
f4 white pawn
b3 white king
d3 white pawn
f3 white pawn
8
7 7
6 6
5 5
4 4
3 3
2 2
1 1
a b c d e f g h

Allumwandlung (German for "complete promotion", sometimes abbreviated AUW) is a chess problem where, at some stage in the solution, a pawn (or sometimes pawns) is promoted variously to a queen, rook, bishop, and knight. Allumwandlung's main requirement is promotion, either a white pawn or a black pawn. A Babson task may appear if both pawns are spotted in an individual problem, corresponding one another.[1]

Contents

  • Example 1
  • References 2

Example

The diagram shows a chess problem with Allumwandlung composed by Niels Høeg and first published in 1905. White to move and mate in three. The key move (White's first move) is 1.f7, and depending on how Black defends, White promotes to either a queen, a rook, a bishop or a knight on move two. The lines are:

  • 1... e4 2. f8=Q any 3. Qe7/Qf6#
  • 1... Kd6 2. f8=Q Kc6 3. Qc5#
  • 1... exf4 2. f8=R Kd6 3. Rf6#
  • 1... exd4 2. f8=B Kf6 3. Ra6#
  • 1... Kf6 2. f8=N exd4 3. Rf7#

The importance of White's underpromotions can be understood by considering what happens if he promotes to a queen no matter what Black plays: after 1...exf4 or 1...exd4 2.f8=Q is stalemate, while following 1...Kf6 2.f8=Q+ Kxg6 there is no mate.

References

  1. ^ Hornecker, Siegfried. "Allmunwadlung by Siegfried Hornecker". chessproblem.net. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 

Bibliography

  •  
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.