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Art Davis

Art Davis
Born (1934-12-05)December 5, 1934
Origin Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, US
Died July 29, 2007(2007-07-29) (aged 72)
Genres Jazz
Occupation(s) Double bassist
Instruments Double bass
Associated acts Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane, Dizzy Gillespie, Max Roach

Art Davis (December 5, 1934 – July 29, 2007) was a double-bassist, known for his work with various seminal jazz musicians including Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane, Dizzy Gillespie, McCoy Tyner and Max Roach.

Contents

  • Biography 1
  • Discography 2
    • As leader 2.1
    • As sideman 2.2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Biography

Davis was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, where he began studying the piano at the age of five, switched to tuba, and finally to bass while attending high school. He studied at Juilliard and Manhattan School of Music but graduated from Hunter College [1]

As a busy New York session musician, he recorded with many pop artists and also worked in classical symphony orchestras including the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Art Davis was a professor at Orange Coast College.[2]

Davis is also known for launching a legal case that led to the current system of blind auditions for orchestras.[3][4]

Davis earned a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from New York University in 1982. He moved in 1986 to southern California, where he balanced his teaching and practicing of psychology with jazz performances.

Davis died on July 29, 2007, from a heart attack. He was survived by two sons and a daughter.[5]

Discography

As leader

As sideman

With Gene Ammons

With Art Blakey

With John Coltrane

With Curtis Fuller

With Dizzy Gillespie

With Eddie Harris

With Freddie Hubbard

With Elvin Jones

With Etta Jones

With Clifford Jordan

With Roland Kirk

With Abbey Lincoln

With Booker Little

With Lee Morgan

With Dizzy Reece

With Max Roach

With Hilton Ruiz

With Lalo Schifrin

With Shirley Scott

With McCoy Tyner

References

  1. ^ Matt Schudel (August 5, 2007). "Jazz Bassist Art Davis, 73; Later Became Psychologist". Washington Post. Retrieved September 13, 2013. 
  2. ^  
  3. ^ IHT.com
  4. ^ Jocelyn Y. Stewart (August 5, 2007). "Art Davis, renowned bassist, dies at 73". The Seattle Times Company. Retrieved September 13, 2013. 
  5. ^ Obituary "Art Davis, Coltrane's favourite bassist, dies at 73". August 4, 2007. Retrieved September 13, 2013. 

External links

  • Official website
  • Art Davis Discography at Jazz Discography
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