World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Barnett–Chao

Article Id: WHEBN0016791391
Reproduction Date:

Title: Barnett–Chao  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Cantonese, EFEO Chinese transcription, Lessing-Othmer, Romanization of Chinese, Sichuanese Pinyin
Collection: Cantonese Romanisation
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Barnett–Chao

The Barnett–Chao (abbreviated here as B–C) system of romanization for writing Cantonese is based on the principles of the Gwoyeu Romatzyh system (GR) for writing Mandarin Chinese in the Latin alphabet. The Barnett–Chao system has had a limited following and appears almost exclusively in Y.R. Chao's Cantonese Primer. There are two reasons for its lack of widespread adoption despite the inherent benefits of tonal spelling. Firstly, requires a large number of roman letters to represent each toned syllable. Secondly, like GR, it uses a complex system for representing tone that makes the system difficult to learn and obscures the basic relationship between spelling and tone.

Contents

  • Description 1
    • Basic forms 1.1
    • Initials 1.2
    • Finals 1.3
    • Tones 1.4
    • Examples 1.5
  • References 2

Description

Like GR spelling, B–C spelling uses contrasting unvoiced/voiced pairs of consonants to represent aspirated and unaspirated sounds. B–C also uses single versus double vowels letters to represent certain short + high versus long + low final vowels even in open syllables where the contrast does not exist: buk, buut, baa, and different letters to represent the contrast in other cases: sek, sin. Some vowels are only long and do not use doubling to represent length: ea, o, y.

The Cantonese high and low pitch registers are indicated by inserting -h- or -r- between the initial and final: bhat, brat. Medium pitch register has no insert, and is considered the basic form: baa.

Basic forms

The following two tables list the B–C spellings of initials and finals with their corresponding IPA values.

Initials

b
[p]
p
[pʰ]
m
[m]
f
[f]
d
[t]
t
[tʰ]
n
[n]
l
[l]
g
[k]
k
[kʰ]
ng
[ŋ]
x
[h]
q
[ʔ]
z
[ts]
c
[tsʰ]
s
[s]
 
gw
[kw]
kw
[kʰw]
j
[j]
w
[w]

Finals

aa
[a]
aai
[ai]
aau
[au]
aam
[am]
aan
[an]
aang
[aŋ]
aap
[ap]
aat
[at]
aak
[ak]
  ai
[ɐi]
au
[ɐu]
am
[ɐm]
an
[ɐn]
ang
[ɐŋ]
ap
[ɐp]
at
[ɐt]
ak
[ɐk]
ea
[ɛ]
ei
[ei]
      eang
[ɛŋ]
    eak
[ɛk]
i
[i]
  iu
[iu]
im
[im]
in
[in]
eng
[ɪŋ]
ip
[ip]
it
[it]
ek
[ɪk]
o
[ɔ]
oi
[ɔi]
ou
[ou]
  on
[ɔn]
ong
[ɔŋ]
  ot
[ɔt]
ok
[ɔk]
uu
[u]
uui
[ui]
    uun
[un]
ung
[ʊŋ]
  uut
[ut]
uk
[ʊk]
eo
[œ]
  eoi
[ɵy]
  eon
[ɵn]
eong
[œŋ]
  eot
[ɵt]
eok
[œk]
y
[y]
      yn
[yn]
    yt
[yt]
 
      m
[m̩]
  ng
[ŋ̩]
     

Tones

There are nine normal tones in six distinct tone contours and two modified tones in Cantonese.

B–C spelling represents the normal tones using the letters h and r before and after the main vowel of the final as well as spelling changes of certain finals as described below.

Before the vowel of the final, h indicates that the start of the tone is high; after the vowel of the final, h indicates that the tone falls, however a falling contour is also indicated by a change in spelling in some finals: Vi > Vy, Vu > Vw, ng > nq, n > nn, m > mm for example saan "disperse" and shaann "mountain", sou "number" and show "whiskers", sai "small" and shay "west".

Before the vowel of the final, r indicates that the start of the tone is low; after the vowel of the final, r indicates that the tone rises, however a rising contour is also indicated by a change in spelling in some finals: Vi > Ve, Vu > Vo for example sai "small" and sae "wash", sou "number" and soo "count".

The modified tones representing high-flat (高平) and modified mid-rising (高升) when the original tone is not mid-rising are indicated by adding an 'x or v after the end of the syllable. High-register syllables that end in a stop (entering tone) are already considered high-flat and cannot take x.
No. Description B–C examples
1 high-falling shih shinn
2 mid-rising sir sirn
3 mid-flat si sin
4 low-falling srih srinn
5 low-rising srir srirn
6 low-flat sri srin
7 high-entering shek
8 mid-entering sit
9 low-entering srek
10 high-flat shihx shinnx
11 mid-rising modified shihv shinnv

Examples

Traditional Simplified Yale Romanization with tone marks Barnett–Chao Romanization
廣州話 广州话 gwóng jàu wá Gworngzhawwraav
粵語 粤语 yuht yúh jrytjryr
你好 你好 néih hóu nree xoo

References

  • Chao, Yuen Ren, Cantonese Primer, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1947.
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.