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Casualties of the Sri Lankan Civil War

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Title: Casualties of the Sri Lankan Civil War  
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Language: English
Subject: Sri Lankan Civil War, 1990 massacre of Sri Lankan Police officers, Tamils Against Genocide, Arumaithurai Tharmaletchumi, Premini Thanuskodi
Collection: Lists of the Sri Lankan Civil War, Sri Lankan Civil War Casualties
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Casualties of the Sri Lankan Civil War

The Sri Lankan civil war was very costly, killing an estimated 80,000-100,000 people between 1982 and 2009.[1] The deaths include 27,639 Tamil fighters, more than 21,066 Sri Lankan soldiers, 1000 Sri Lankan police, 1500 Indian soldiers, and tens of thousands of civilians. The [4]

Contents

  • Summary 1
  • Casualties 2
  • Eelam War I 3
  • Indian intervention 4
  • Eelam War II 5
  • Eelam War III 6
  • Cease Fire Period 7
  • Eelam War IV 8
  • Overall 9
  • References 10

Summary

Minister of Defence Gotabhaya Rajapaksa said on an interview with state television that 23,790 Sri Lankan military personnel were killed since 1981 (it was not specified if police or other non armed forces personnel were included in this particular figure).

From the August 2006 recapture of the Mavil Aru reservoir until the formal declaration of the cessation of hostilities (on May 18), 6261 Sri Lankan soldiers were killed and 29,551 were wounded.[5]

The Sri Lankan military estimates that up to 22,000 Tamil Tiger rebels were killed in the last three years of the conflict.[6]

The final five months of the civil war saw the heaviest civilian casualties. The UN, based on credible witness evidence from aid agencies and civilians evacuated from the Safe Zone by sea, estimated that 6,500 civilians were killed and another 14,000 injured between mid-January 2009, when the Safe Zone was first declared, and mid-April 2009.[7][8] There are no official casualty figures after this period but estimates of the death toll for the final four months of the civil war (mid-January to mid-May) range from 15,000 to 20,000.[9][10] A US State Department report has suggested that the actual casualty figures were probably much higher than the UN's estimates and that significant numbers of casualties weren't recorded.[11] A former UN official has claimed that up to 40,000 civilians may have been killed in the final stages of the civil war.[12]

Casualties

War or Phase Date Deaths Total dead Wounded Total wounded Sources/
notes
combat other total combat other total
C SF TT C SF TT C SF TT C SF TT C SF TT C SF TT
Eelam War I 1983 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
1984
1985
1986
Eelam War I/Indian intervention 1987
1988
1989
Indian intervention
/Eelam War II
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
Eelam War II/Eelam War III 1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000 162 784 2,845 [13]
2001 89 412 1,321 [13]
2002 Ceasefire 2002 14 1 0 [13]
2003 31 2 26 [13]
2004 33 7 69 [13]
2005 153 90 87 [13]
2002 Ceasefire/Eelam War IV 2006 981 826 2,319 [13]
2007 525 499 3,345 [13]
2008 404 1,314 9,426 [13]
2009 11,108 1,312 2,941 [13]
Total ≈26 years 13,500 5,247 22,379 23,790 27,639 [13]

Eelam War I

Year Civilians Security Force LTTE Total
1983 400 - 3,000 13 53 - 100 ~3,113
1984
1985
1986
1987
Total
Notes:
Source:

Indian intervention

Year Civilians Security Force IPKF LTTE Total
1987
1988
1989
1990
Total 26 1,000+ 1,300
Notes:
Source:

Eelam War II

Year Civilians Security Force LTTE Total
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
Total
Notes:
Source:

Eelam War III

Year Civilians Security Force LTTE Total
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000* 162 784 2,845 3,791
2001 89 412 1,321 1,822
Total 251 1,196 4,166 5,613
Notes:*Data from March 1, 2000
Source:[14]

Cease Fire Period

Year Civilians Security Force LTTE Total
2002 14 1 0 15
2003 31 2 26 59
2004 33 7 69 109
2005 153 90 87 330
Total 231 100 182 513
Notes:Includes only Casualties between 2002-2005 most of which is the Cease Fire.
Source:[14]

Eelam War IV

Year Civilians Security Force LTTE Total
2006 981 826 2,319 4,126
2007 525 499 3,345 4,369
2008 404 1,314 9,426 11,144
2009* 9,257 1,312 2,515 13,084
Total
Notes:*Data till April 20, 2009
Source:[14][15]

Overall

Year Civilians Security Force LTTE Total
Eelam War I
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
Indian intervention
1988
1989
Eelam War II
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
Eelam War III
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000** 162 784 2,845 3,791
2001 89 412 1,321 1,822
Cease Fire
2002 14 1 0 15
2003 31 2 26 59
2004 33 7 69 109
2005 153 90 87 330
Eelam War IV
2006 981 826 2,319 4,126
2007 525 499 3,345 4,369
2008 404 1,314 9,426 11,144
2009* 9,257 1,312 2,515 13,084
Total 11,649 5,247 21,953 38,849
Notes:*Data till May 11, 2009, **Data from March 1, 2000
Source:[14][15]

The above table is . Revisions and additions are welcome.

References

  1. ^ "Up to 100,000 killed in Sri Lanka's civil war: UN".  
  2. ^ Ford Institute for Human Security, Human Security Data, http://www.fordinstitute.pitt.edu/FordResources/Databases/tabid/466/Default.aspx,
  3. ^ Uppsala Conflict Data Program, Low-high estimates for state based fighting between Government of Sri Lanka (Ceylon) and JVP (low:61-high:61)Government of Sri Lanka (Ceylon) and LTTE (Low:56,219-high:70,375), deliberate killings of civilians by Government of Sri Lanka (Ceylon) (low:368-high:1,666) and LTTE (low:2,252-high:3,110) and fighting between LTTE and LTTE-Karuna Faction (low:192-high:294) and LTTE and PLOTE (low:101-high:103), http://www.ucdp.uu.se/gpdatabase/gpcountry.php?id=144®ionSelect=6-Central_and_Southern_Asia# viewed 2013-05-03
  4. ^ Uppsala Conflict Data Program, Sri Lanka Conflict Summary, http://www.ucdp.uu.se/gpdatabase/gpcountry.php?id=144®ionSelect=6-Central_and_Southern_Asia
  5. ^ "Victory's price: 6,200 Sri Lankan troops". The Sydney Morning Herald. 22 May 2009. 
  6. ^ http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/eda17636-4733-11de-923e-00144feabdc0.html?nclick_check=1
  7. ^ David Pallister & Gethin Chamberlain (24 April 2009). "Sri Lanka war toll near 6,500, UN report says". London:  
  8. ^ "Sri Lanka rejects rebel ceasefire".  
  9. ^ Chamberlain, Gethin (29 May 2009). "Sri Lanka death toll 'unacceptably high', says UN". London:  
  10. ^ "Slaughter in Sri Lanka". London:  
  11. ^ "Report to Congress on Incidents During the Recent Conflict in Sri Lanka".  
  12. ^ Buncombe, Andrew (12 February 2010). "'"Up to 40,000 civilians 'died in Sri Lanka offensive.  
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k http://satp.org/satporgtp/countries/shrilanka/database/annual_casualties.htm
  14. ^ a b c d South Asian Terrorism Portal.
  15. ^ a b South Asian Terrorism Portal.
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