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Dominick L. DiCarlo

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Dominick L. DiCarlo

Dominick Leonard DiCarlo
Senior Judge of the United States Court of International Trade
In office
October 31, 1996 – April 27, 1999
Chief Judge of the United States Court of International Trade
In office
1991–1996
Judge of the United States Court of International Trade
In office
June 11, 1984 – October 31, 1996
Appointed by Ronald Reagan
Preceded by Bernard Newman
Succeeded by Judith M. Barzilay
Personal details
Born (1928-03-11)March 11, 1928
Brooklyn, New York
Died April 27, 1999(1999-04-27) (aged 71)
Manhattan, New York
Alma mater St. John's University B.A.
St. John's University School of Law LL.B.
New York University School of Law LL.M.
Profession Judge

Dominick Leonard DiCarlo (March 11, 1928 – 1999) was an American lawyer and politician from New York. He was a member of the New York State Assembly from 1965 to 1981; Ronald Reagan's first Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotics Matters from 1981 to 1984; and a judge of the United States Court of International Trade from 1984 to 1999.

Biography

Dominick L. DiCarlo was born in Brooklyn on March 11, 1928, and raised in the Bay Ridge neighborhood. He was educated at St. John's College, receiving a B.A. in 1950. He then attended the St. John's University School of Law, graduating with an LL.B. in 1953. He was admitted to the bar in 1954. He completed his education at the New York University School of Law, receiving an LL.M. in 1957.

A practicing attorney since 1954, in 1959 he became an Assistant United States Department of Justice in 1962. From 1962 to 1965, he was counsel to the minority leader of the New York City Council.

DiCarlo was a member of the New York State Assembly from 1965 to 1981, sitting in the 175th, 176th, 177th, 178th, 179th, 180th, 181st, 182nd, 183rd and 184th New York State Legislatures. He was Vice Chairman of the New York Joint Legislative Committee on Crime from 1969 to 1970; Chairman of the Assembly Committee on Codes and an ex officio member of the New York Law Revision Commission and the Judicial Conference of the State of New York from 1971 to 1974; and Vice Chairman of the Select Committee on Correctional Institutions and Programs (appointed in the wake of the Attica Prison riot) from 1972 to 1973 In 1973, he was the only Republican in the State Assembly who voted against the Rockefeller drug laws. From 1975 to 1978, he was Deputy Minority Leader of the New York State Assembly.

In July 1981, President Ronald Reagan announced his intention to nominate DiCarlo as Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotics Matters. Following Senate confirmation, DiCarlo held this office from September 25, 1981, to July 13, 1984. He spent much of his time in office trying to persuade foreign leaders to supplant fields of opium poppies with other crops.

On May 25, 1984, President Reagan nominated DiCarlo to replace senior status.

DiCarlo died on April 27, 1999, after suffering a heart attack while exercising in the gym at the James L. Watson Court of International Trade Building.

The Annual DiCarlo Lecture in International Law at John Marshall Law School is named in his honor.

His son Robert DiCarlo was a New York State Senator from 1993 to 1997.

References

New York Assembly
Preceded by
Luigi R. Marano
New York State Assembly
Kings County, 12th District

1965
Succeeded by
district abolished
Preceded by
new district
New York State Assembly
59th District

1966
Succeeded by
Edward J. Amann, Jr.
Preceded by
Harold W. Cohn
New York State Assembly
49th District

1967–1981
Succeeded by
Louis Freda
Government offices
Preceded by
Mathea Falco
Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotics Matters
1981–1984
Succeeded by
Jon R. Thomas
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