Under The Southern Cross I Stand

Under The Southern Cross I Stand is the victory song of the Australian cricket team.

It is typically sung by the players in the style of a raucous chant[1] after every victory and "treated with reverential consideration and respect" within the team.[2] The official lyrics are as follows, though when it is sung by the players, the word "little" in the last line is replaced by "fucking".[3]

Under the Southern Cross I Stand
A sprig of wattle in my hand,
A native of my native land,
Australia you little beauty.[4]

The authorship of this "Under the Southern Cross I Stand" is credited to former wicketkeeper Rod Marsh, who was apparently inspired by Henry Lawson's 1887 poem, "Flag of the Southern Cross".[2] Marsh initially had the role of leading the team in singing it, and on his retirement he passed it on to Allan Border. The other players to have taken on the role are David Boon (when Border took over the captaincy), Ian Healy (on Boon's retirement), Ricky Ponting (on Healy's retirement), Justin Langer (when Ponting took over the captaincy), and Michael Hussey (on Langer's retirement). Hussey has now passed it on to Nathan Lyon upon his retirement in January 2013.[5]

References

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