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United States House of Representatives elections in Kansas, 2008

 

United States House of Representatives elections in Kansas, 2008

The 2008 congressional elections in Kansas were held on November 4, 2008 to determine who would represent the state of Kansas in the United States House of Representatives, coinciding with the presidential and senatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected will serve in the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009 until January 3, 2011.

Kansas has four seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007-2008 congressional delegation consisted of two Republicans and two Democrats. It is now three Republicans and one Democrat. District 2 was the only seat which changed party (from Democratic to Republican), although CQ Politics had forecasted districts 2 and 3 to be at some risk for the incumbent party.

The primary elections for Republican Party and Democratic Party candidates were held on August 5.[1]

Overview

United States House of Representatives elections in Kansas, 2008[2]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Republican 690,005 57.11% 3 +1
Democratic 470,031 38.90% 1 -1
Libertarian 25,663 2.12% 0
Reform 22,603 1.87% 0
Totals 1,208,302 100.00% 4

District 1

Incumbent Republican Jerry Moran won re-election, defeating Democratic nominee James Bordonaro and independents Kathleen Burton and Jack Warner. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Republican'.

Kansas's 1st congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jerry Moran (inc.) 214,549 81.88%
Democratic James Bordonaro 34,771 13.27%
Reform Kathleen M. Burton 7,145 2.73%
Libertarian Jack Warner 5,562 2.12%
Totals 262,027 100.00%
Republican hold

District 2

Republican nominee and former Kansas State Treasurer Lynn Jenkins won against Democratic incumbent Nancy Boyda, Libertarian Robert Garrard, and Reform Party candidate Leslie Martin. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'No Clear Favorite'.

Kansas's 2nd congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lynn Jenkins 155,532 50.61%
Democratic Nancy Boyda (inc.) 142,013 46.21%
Reform Leslie S. Martin 5,080 1.65%
Libertarian Robert Garrard 4,683 1.52%
Totals 307,308 100.00%
Republican gain from Democratic

District 3

Incumbent Democrat Dennis Moore won against Republican nominee and Kansas State Senator Nick Jordan, Libertarian candidate Joe Bellis, and Reform candidate Roger Tucker. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Democrat Favored'.

Kansas's 3rd congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dennis Moore (inc.) 202,541 56.44%
Republican Nick Jordan 142,307 39.66%
Libertarian Joe Bellis 10,073 2.81%
Reform Roger D. Trucker 3,937 1.10%
Totals 358,858 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 4

Incumbent Republican Todd Tiahrt won against Democratic nominee and Kansas State Senator Donald Betts, Jr., Libertarian candidate Steven Rosile and Reform Party candidate Susan G. Ducey in the General election. CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Republican'.

Kansas's 1st congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Todd Tiahrt (inc.) 177,617 63.41%
Democratic Donald Betts, Jr. 90,706 32.38%
Reform Susan G. Ducey 6,441 2.30%
Libertarian Steve A. Rosile 5,345 1.91%
Totals 280,109 100.00%
Republican hold

References

  1. ^ 2008 Election Calendar Kansas Secretary of State'
  2. ^ http://clerk.house.gov/member_info/electionInfo/2008/2008Stat.htm#stateKS

External links

  • Elections & Legislative from the Kansas Secretary of State
  • U.S. Congress candidates for Kansas at Project Vote Smart
  • Campaign contributions for Kansas congressional races from OpenSecrets.org
  • Kansas U.S. House of Representatives race from 2008 Race Tracker
Preceded by
2006 elections
United States House elections in Kansas
2008
Succeeded by
2010 elections
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