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United States House of Representatives elections in Missouri, 2010

 

United States House of Representatives elections in Missouri, 2010

Elections were held on November 2, 2010, to determine Missouri's nine members of the United States House of Representatives. Representatives were elected for two-year terms to serve in the 112th Congress from January 3, 2011 until January 3, 2013. Primary elections were held on August 3, 2010.[1]

Of the nine elections, the races in the 3rd and 4th districts were rated as competitive by The Cook Political Report,[2] CQ Politics,[3] The Rothenberg Political Report[4] and Sabato's Crystal Ball.[5][6] Seven of Missouri's nine incumbents were re-elected, while one (Ike Skelton of the 4th district) unsuccessfully sought re-election[7] and one (Roy Blunt of the 7th district) did not seek re-election.[8]

In total, six Republicans and three Democrats were elected.[8] A total of 1,920,675 votes were cast, of which 1,103,290 (57.44 percent) were for Republican candidates, 708,064 (36.87 percent) were for Democratic candidates, 92,485 (4.81 percent) were for Libertarian Party candidates, 8,759 (0.46 percent) were for Constitution Party candidates, 7,193 (0.37 percent) were for an independent candidate and 884 (0.05 percent) were for write-in candidates.[9]

District 1

William Lacy Clay, Jr., who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 1st district

The 1st district included Ferguson, Florissant, Hazelwood, Spanish Lake, and parts of St. Louis and University City.[10] The district's population was 54 percent black and 40 percent white (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 83 percent were high school graduates and 24 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $41,404.[11] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 80 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 19 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[10]

Democrat William Lacy Clay, Jr., who took office in 2001, was the incumbent. Clay was re-elected in 2008 with 87 percent of the vote.[10] In 2010 Clay's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Robyn Hamlin, an insurance agent.[12] Libertarian Party nominee Julie Stone also ran.[13] Candice Britton also sought the Democratic nomination.[14] Martin Baker and Marshall Works also sought the Republican nomination. Robb Cunningham also sought the Libertarian nomination.[11]

Clay raised $693,370 and spent $635,944. Hamlin raised $23,930 and spent $24,012.[15] Britton raised $1,813 and spent $2,026.[16]

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Clay a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 74 percent of the vote to Hamlin's 23 percent.[17] On election day Clay was re-elected with 74 percent of the vote to Hamlin's 24 percent.[18] Clay was re-elected in 2012, again over Hamlin,[19] and in 2014.[20]

Democratic primary results

Missouri's 1st district Democratic primary, August 3, 2010[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic William Lacy Clay, Jr. (incumbent) 37,041 81.25%
Democratic Candice Britton 8,546 18.75%
Totals 45,587 100.00%

Republican primary results

Missouri's 1st district Republican primary, August 3, 2010[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Robyn Hamlin 10,305 63.21%
Republican Martin Baker 4,532 27.80%
Republican Marshall Works 1,467 9.00%
Totals 16,304 100.00%

Libertarian primary results

Missouri's 1st district Libertarian primary results, August 3, 2010[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Julie Stone 150 51.55%
Libertarian Robb Cunningham 141 48.45%
Totals 291 100.00%

General election results

Missouri's 1st district general election, November 2, 2010[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic William Lacy Clay, Jr. (incumbent) 135,907 73.55%
Republican Robyn Hamlin 43,649 23.62%
Libertarian Julie Stone 5,223 2.83%
Totals 184,779 100.00%

External links

  • Martin Baker campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived February 6, 2010)
  • Candice Britton campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 17, 2010)
  • William Lacy Clay, Jr. campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived August 17, 2010)
  • Robb Cunningham campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived September 8, 2010)
  • Robyn Hamlin campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 28, 2010)

District 2

Todd Akin, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 2nd district

The 2nd district included Ballwin, Chesterfield, St. Charles, Wildwood and parts of O'Fallon, St. Peters and Wentzville.[21] The district's population was 91 percent white (see Race and ethnicity in the United States); 93 percent were high school graduates and 42 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $73,641.[22] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 55 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 44 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[21]

Republican Todd Akin, who took office in 2001, was the incumbent. Akin was re-elected in 2008 with 62 percent of the vote.[21] In 2010 Akin's opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee Arthur Lieber, the co-founder of the Crossroads College Preparatory School.[23] Libertarian Party Steve Mosbacher also ran.[24] Bill Haas and Jeffrey Lowe also sought the Republican nomination.[25] Liz Lauber, a government and industry relations communications consultant for Wells Fargo, ended her campaign for the Republican nomination in April 2010.[26] Lieber was unopposed for the Democratic nomination.[27]

Akin raised $767,798 and spent $825,668. Lieber raised $50,504 and spent $49,234.[28] Haas raised $33,372 and spent $13,449.[29] Lauber raised $6,724 and spent the same amount.[30]

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Akin a 100 percent chance of winning, and projected that he would receive 68 percent of the vote to Lieber's 29 percent.[31] On election day Akin was re-elected with 68 percent of the vote to Lieber's 29 percent.[18] In 2011 Lieber wrote and published a book about his campaign entitled An Unlikely Candidate: Reflections on My Run for Office.[27] Akin unsuccessfully ran for the U.S. Senate in 2012.[32] He was succeeded by Republican Ann Wagner.[33]

Republican primary results

Missouri's 2nd district Republican primary, August 3, 2010[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Todd Akin (incumbent) 72,269 84.57%
Republican Bill Haas 9,494 11.11%
Republican Jeffrey Lowe 3,692 4.32%
Totals 85,455 100.00%

General election results

Missouri's 2nd district general election, November 2, 2010[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Todd Akin (incumbent) 180,481 67.94%
Democratic Arthur Lieber 77,467 29.16%
Libertarian Steve Mosbacher 7,677 2.89%
Write-in Patrick M. Cannon 7 0.00%
Totals 265,632 100.00%

Further reading

  • Lieber, Arthur (May 5, 2011). An Unlikely Candidate: Reflections on My Run for Congress. eBookIt.com.  

External links

District 3

Russ Carnahan, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 3rd district

The 3rd district included Oakville and part of St. Louis.[34] The district's population was 85 percent white and 9 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States); 86 percent were high school graduates and 27 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $51,192.[35] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 60 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 39 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[34] In 2010 the district had a Cook Partisan Voting Index of D+7.[2]

Democrat Russ Carnahan, who took office in 2005, was the incumbent. Carnahan was re-elected in 2008 with 66 percent of the vote.[34] In 2010 Carnahan's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Ed Martin, a former chief of staff to Governor of Missouri Matt Blunt.[36] Constitution Party nominee Nick Ivanovich and Libertarian Party nominee Steven Hedrick also ran.[37] David Arnold and Edward Crim also sought the Democratic nomination. John Wayne Tucker[38] and Rusty Wallace, a computer-aided design technician,[39] also sought the Republican nomination.

Carnahan raised $2,127,173 and spent $2,276,619. Martin raised $1,539,980 and spent $1,514,663.[40] Arnold raised $907 and spent $904.[41] Tucker raised $9,125 and spent $9,124.[42]

A poll of 400 likely voters, conducted by Ayres, McHenry & Associates on August 16, 17 and 20, 2010, found Carnahan leading with 54 percent to Martin's 38 percent, while 8 percent were undecided.[43] In a poll of 1,089 registered voters, conducted on August 17, 2010 by We Ask America, found Carnahan leading with 48 percent to Martin's 39 percent, while 13 percent were undecided.[44] Sabato's Crystal Ball rated the race as "Likely Democratic".[5] In October 2010, The Cook Political Report rated the race as "Lean Democratic"[2] and CQ Politics rated the race as "Likely Democratic".[3] In November 2010 The Rothenberg Political Report rated the race as "Democrat Favored".[4] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Carnahan a 96 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 55 percent of the vote to Martin's 43 percent.[45]

On election day Carnahan was re-elected with 49 percent of the vote to Martin's 47 percent.[18] Martin conceded on November 8.[46] Carnahan unsuccessfully sought re-election in 2012.[47] The same year Martin unsuccessfully ran for Missouri Attorney General.[48]

Democratic primary results

Missouri's 2nd district Democratic primary, August 3, 2010[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Russ Carnahan (incumbent) 36,976 80.14%
Democratic David Arnold 6,467 14.02%
Democratic Edward Crim 2,697 5.85%
Totals 46,140 100.00%

Republican primary results

Missouri's 3rd district Republican primary, August 3, 2010[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Ed Martin 22,266 63.39%
Republican Rusty Wallace 7,478 21.29%
Republican John Wayne Tucker 5,379 15.31%
Totals 35,123 100.00%

General election results

Missouri's 3rd district general election, November 2, 2010[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Russ Carnahan 99,398 48.94%
Republican Ed Martin 94,757 46.66%
Libertarian Steven Hedrick 5,772 2.84%
Constitution Nick Ivanovich 3,155 1.55%
Write-in Brian Wallner 3 0.00%
Totals 203,085 100.00%

External links

  • Russ Carnahan campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 28, 2010)
  • Edward Crim campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived August 29, 2010)
  • Nick Ivanovich campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived November 4, 2010)
  • Ed Martin campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 28, 2010)
  • John Wayne Tucker campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived May 12, 2010)

District 4

Vicky Hartzler, who was elected as the U.S. Representative for the 4th district
Ike Skelton, who unsuccessfully sought re-election in the 4th district
Bill Stouffer, who unsuccessfully ran in the Republican primary in the 4th district

The 4th district included Sedalia and part of Jefferson City.[49] The district's population was 91 percent white (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 85 percent were high school graduates and 17 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $42,317.[50] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 61 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 38 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[49] In 2010 the district had a Cook Partisan Voting Index of R+14.[2]

Democrat Ike Skelton, who took office in 1977, was the incumbent. Skelton was re-elected in 2008 with 66 percent of the vote.[49] In 2010 Skelton's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Vicky Hartzler, a former member of the Missouri General Assembly.[51] Constitution Party nominee Greg Cowan and Libertarian Party nominee Jason Michael Braun also ran.[52] Leonard Steinman, a salvage dealer and perennial candidate, also sought the Democratic nomination.[53] Brian Clark; Arthur Madden; Eric McElroy; Jeff Parnell; Brian Riley; James Scholz;[50] Bill Stouffer, a member of the Missouri Senate; and Roy Viessman, a former member of the Jefferson City Council,[54] also sought the Republican nomination. Thomas Holbrook also sought the Libertarian nomination.[50]

Skelton raised $2,923,038 and spent $3,107,552. Hartzler raised $1,373,530 and spent $1,351,176. Cowan raised $1,369 and spent $2,320.[55] Madden raised $19,596 and spent the same amount.[56] Riley raised $44,655 and spent $44,654.[57] Scholz raised $31,208 and spent $31,081.[58] Stouffer raised $464,174 and spent $460,777.[59]

In a poll of 1,207 registered voters, conducted by We Ask America on August 17, 2010, Skelton led with 45 percent to Hartzler's 42 percent, while 13 percent were undecided.[44] A poll of 187 registered voters, conducted by KY3 and Missouri State University (MSU) between August 7 and 22, 2010, found 47 percent supported Skelton while 35 percent favored Hartzler and 2 percent were undecided.[60] In a poll of 300 likely voters, conducted in October 2010 by Wilson Research Strategies, Hartzler and Skelton were tied with 42 percent apiece.[61] A poll of 159 likely voters, conducted by MSU's Center for Social Sciences and Policy Research between October 20 and 27, 2010, found Skelton led with 46 percent to Hartzler's 39 percent, while 14 percent were undecided and 2 percent supported other candidates.[62]

Sabato's Crystal Ball rated the race as "Leans Democratic".[6] In October 2010 The Cook Political Report rated the race as a "toss up"[2] and CQ Politics rated the race as a "tossup".[3] In November 2010 The Rothenberg Political Report rated the race as a "pure toss-up".[4] Prior to the election, FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Hartzler a 52 percent chance of winning and projected that she would receive 50 percent of the vote to Skelton's 48 percent.[63]

On election day Hartzler was elected with 50 percent of the vote to Skelton's 45 percent.[18] Hartzler was re-elected in 2012[64] and 2014.[65] Skelton died in October 2013.[66]

Democratic primary results

Missouri's 4th district Democratic primary, August 3, 2010[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ike Skelton (incumbent) 25,919 80.53%
Democratic Leonard Steinman 6,268 19.47%
Totals 32,187 100.00%

Republican primary results

Missouri's 4th district Republican primary, August 3, 2010[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Vicky Hartzler 35,860 40.46%
Republican Bill Stouffer 26,573 29.98%
Republican Jeff Parnell 7,969 9.00%
Republican James Scholz 4,259 4.81%
Republican Roy Viessman 3,702 4.18%
Republican Brian Riley 3,197 3.61%
Republican Brian Clark 2,658 3.00%
Republican Arthur Madden 2,484 2.80%
Republican Eric McElroy 1,928 2.18%
Totals 88,630 100.00%

Libertarian primary results

Missouri's 4th district Libertarian primary, August 3, 2010[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Jason Michael Braun 165 50.61%
Libertarian Thomas Holbrook 161 49.39%
Totals 326 100.00%

General election results

Missouri's 4th district general election, November 2, 2010[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Vicky Hartzler 113,489 50.43%
Democratic Ike Skelton (incumbent) 101,532 45.11%
Libertarian Jason Michael Braun 6,123 2.72%
Constitution Greg Cowan 3,912 1.74%
Totals 225,056 100.00%

External links

  • Greg Cowan campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 28, 2010)
  • Vicky Hartzler campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 28, 2010)
  • Arthur Madden campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived September 24, 2010)
  • Jeff Parnell campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived July 21, 2010)
  • Ike Skelton campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 29, 2010)
  • Bill Stouffer campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived March 28, 2010)

District 5

Emanuel Cleaver, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 5th district

The 5th district included Belton, Grandview, Raytown, and parts of Independence, Kansas City and Lee's Summit.[67] The district's population was 64 percent white, 24 percent black and 8 percent Hispanic (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 87 percent were high school graduates and 26 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $45,213.[68] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 63 percent of its vote to Democratic nominee Barack Obama and 36 percent to Republican nominee John McCain.[67]

Democrat Emanuel Cleaver, who took office in 2005, was the incumbent. Cleaver was re-elected in 2008 with 64 percent of the vote.[67] In 2010 Cleaver's opponent in the general election was Republican nominee Jacob Turk, who also ran in 2006 and 2008.[69] Constitution Party nominee Dave Lay and Libertarian Party nominee Randall D. Langkraehr also ran. Jerry Fowler; Patrick Haake;[68] Ron Shawd, a former car dealer;[70] and Ralph Sheffield also sought the Republican nomination. Cleaver was unopposed for the Democratic nomination.[68]

Cleaver raised $637,380 and spent $607,575. Turk raised $274,423 and spent $258,627.[71] In a poll of 500 likely voters, conducted by Pulse Opinion Research (a service run by Rasmussen Reports), found 52 percent supported Cleaver while 43 percent backed Turk.[72] FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Cleaver a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 59 percent of the vote to Turk's 39 percent.[73] On election day Cleaver was re-elected with 53 percent of the vote to Turk's 44 percent.[18] Cleaver was re-elected, again over Turk, in 2012[74] and 2014.[75]

Republican primary results

Missouri's 5th district Republican primary, August 3, 2010[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jacob Turk 23,078 67.00%
Republican Jerry Fowler 3,963 11.51%
Republican Patrick Haake 3,469 10.07%
Republican Ralph Sheffield 2,748 7.98%
Republican Ron Shawd 1,185 3.44%
Totals 34,443 100.00%

General election results

Missouri's 5th district general election, November 2, 2010[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Emanuel Cleaver 102,076 53.32%
Republican Jacob Turk 84,578 44.18%
Libertarian Randall D. Langkraehr 3,077 1.61%
Constitution Dave Lay 1,692 0.88%
Totals 191,423 100.00%

External links

  • Patrick Haake campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived August 15, 2010)
  • Randall D. Langkkraehr campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 28, 2010)
  • Dave Lay campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 28, 2010)
  • Jacob Turk campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 29, 2010)

District 6

Sam Graves, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 6th district

The 6th district included St. Joseph and parts of Blue Springs and Kansas City.[76] The district's population was 90 percent white (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 89 percent were high school graduates and 25 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $51,899.[77] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 54 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 45 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[76]

Republican Sam Graves, who took office in 2001, was the incumbent. In 2010 Graves's opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee Clint Hylton,[78] an insurance salesman.[79] Write-in candidate Kyle Yarber also ran.[80] Christopher Ryan also sought the Republican nomination.[77] Hylton was unopposed for the Democratic nomination.[78]

Graves raised $1,057,245 and spent $1,071,726. Hylton raised $9,461 and spent $9,394. Yarber raised $16,602 and spent $16,601.[81]

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Graves a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 66 percent of the vote to Hylton's 31 percent.[82] On election day Graves was re-elected with 69 percent of the vote to Hylton's 31 percent.[18] Graves was again re-elected in 2012[83] and 2014.[84]

Republican primary results

Missouri's 6th district Republican primary, August 3, 2010[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sam Graves (incumbent) 54,566 82.46%
Republican Christopher Ryan 11,608 17.54%
Totals 66,174 100.00%

General election results

Missouri's 6th district general election, November 2, 2010[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Sam Graves (incumbent) 154,103 69.44%
Democratic Clint Hylton 67,762 30.54%
Write-in Kyle Yarber 47 0.02%
Totals 221,912 100.00%

External links

  • Sam Graves campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 28, 2010)
  • Clint Hylton campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 29, 2010)
  • Christopher Ryan campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 15, 2010)

District 7

Billy Long, who was elected as the U.S. Representative for the 7th district

The 7th district included Joplin and Springfield.[85] The district's population was 90 percent white (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 85 percent were high school graduates and 22 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $41,452.[86] In the 2008 presidential election, the district gave 63 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 35 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[85]

Republican Roy Blunt, who took office in 1997, was the incumbent. Blunt, the father of Governor Matt Blunt, was re-elected in 2008 with 68 percent of the vote.[85] In 2010 he ran for the U.S. Senate rather than seeking re-election.[8]

The candidates in the general election were Republican nominee Billy Long, an auctioneer;[87] and Democratic nominee Scott Eckersley, an attorney who previously worked for Governor Blunt.[88] Libertarian Party nominee Kevin Craig and write-in candidate Nicholas Ladendorf also ran.[89]

Jack Goodman, a member of the Missouri Senate; Steve Hunter, a former member of the Missouri House of Representatives; Mike Moon, a farmer; Darrell Moore, the Greene County prosecuting attorney; Gary Nodler, a member of the Missouri Senate; Michael Wardell, a small business owner; and Jeff Wisdom, an Iraq War veteran, also sought the Republican nomination.[90] Sarah Steelman, the former State Treasurer of Missouri, announced in September 2009 that she would not run in the 7th district in 2010.[91] Tim Davis, an attorney, also sought the Democratic nomination.[90]

Long raised $1,260,007 and spent $1,230,604. Eckersley raised $186,310 and spent the same amount.[92] Goodman raised $482,233 and spent $478,534.[93] Moon raised $25,279 and spent $25,278.[94] Moore raised $45,424 and spent $44,977.[95] Nodler raised $383,130 and spent $380,240.[96] Wisdom raised $20,101 and spent $20,080.[97] Davis raised $24,119 and spent $22,928.[98]

In a poll of 198 registered voters, conducted by KY3 and Missouri State University (MSU) between August 7 and August 22, 2010, Long led with 51 percent to Eckersley's 23 percent.[60] A poll of 199 likely voters, conducted by MSU's Center for Social Sciences and Public olicy Research between October 20 and 27, 2010, found Long leading with 56 percent to Eckersley's 23 percent while 7 percent supported Craig, 1 percent favored other candidates, and 13 percent were undecided.[62] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Long a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that he would receive 69 percent of the vote to Eckersley's 28 percent.[99] Eckersley increased his share of the voting to more than 30 percent, but Long was elected with 63 percent of the vote.[18] Long was re-elected in 2012[83] and 2014.[100]

On October 29, 2010, an email was sent to local media, purportedly by Eckersley, which falsely claimed that he had ended his campaign. At least one television station inaccurately reported the story as fact. Eckersley later filed a complaint with the Federal Elections Commission (FEC) alleging that Long may have been involved in the hoax. The FEC investigated and reported in 2013 that the emails had come from Patrick Binning, a political consultant, and that Binning had acted independently of Long's campaign. As the FEC found no evidence that Long's campaign or the Republican Party was involved, under the law electoral fraud had not occurred.[101]

Republican primary results

Missouri's 7th district Republican primary, August 3, 2010[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Billy Long 38,218 36.56%
Republican Jack Goodman 30,401 29.08%
Republican Gary Nodler 14,561 13.93%
Republican Darrell Moore 9,312 13.93%
Republican Jeff Wisdom 4,552 4.35%
Republican Mike Moon 4,473 4.28%
Republican Steve Hunter 2,173 2.08%
Republican Michael Wardell 844 0.81%
Totals 104,534 100.00%

Democratic primary results

Missouri's 7th district Democratic primary, August 3, 2010[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Scott Eckersley 9,210 62.66%
Democratic Tim Davis 5,489 37.34%
Totals 14,699 100.00%

General election results

Missouri's 7th district general election, November 2, 2010[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Billy Long 141,010 63.39%
Democratic Scott Eckersley 67,545 30.37%
Libertarian Kevin Craig 13,866 6.23%
Write-in Nicholas Ladendorf 10 0.00%
Totals 222,431 100.00%

External links

  • Kevin Craig campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived November 1, 2010)
  • Tim Davis campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived May 31, 2010)
  • Scott Eckersley campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 29, 2010)
  • Jack Goodman campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived August 4, 2010)
  • Nicholas Ladendorf campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 15, 2010)
  • Billy Long campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived November 2, 2010)
  • Mike Moon campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 8, 2010)
  • Gary Nodler campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived July 3, 2010)
  • Jeff Wisdom campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived July 27, 2010)

District 8

Jo Ann Emerson, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 8th district
Tommy Sowers, who also ran in the 8th district

The 8th district included Cape Girardeau, Poplar Bluff and Rolla.[102] The district's population was 91 percent white and 5 percent black (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 77 percent were high school graduates and 14 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $34,454.[103] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 62 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 36 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[102]

Republican Jo Ann Emerson, who took office in 1996, was the incumbent. Emerson was re-elected with 71 percent of the vote in 2008.[102] Emerson announced in January 2009 that she would not run for the U.S. Senate in 2010.[104] In 2010 Emerson's opponent in the general election was Democratic nominee Tommy Sowers, a former member of the United States Army Special Forces.[105] Independent candidate Larry Bill, a real estate investor and building contractor;[106] and Libertarian Party nominee Rick Vandeven, a technician with Procter & Gamble,[107] also ran. Bob Parker, a farmer, also sought the Republican nomination. Sowers was unopposed for the Democratic nomination.[108]

Emerson raised $2,006,543 and spent $2,071,160. Sowers raised $1,588,389 and spent $1,572,930. Bill raised $15,630 and spent the same amount.[109] Parker raised $38,565 and spent $37,472.[110]

In a poll of 400 likely voters, conducted on April 19 and 20, 2010, by American Viewpoint (AV) for Emerson's campaign, Emerson led with 71 percent to Sowers's 18 percent.[111] A poll of 171 registered voters, conducted by KY3 and Missouri State University between August 7 and 22, 2010, found Emerson leading with 64 percent to Sowers's 17 percent while 3 percent supported other candidates.[60] An AV poll of 400 likely voters, conducted on September 13 and 14, 2010, found Emerson had the support of 63 percent while 24 percent backed Sowers.[112]

Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Emerson a 100 percent chance of winning and projected that she would receive 68 percent of the vote to Sowers's 29 percent.[113] On election day Emerson was re-elected with 66 percent of the vote to Sowers's 29 percent.[18] Emerson was again re-elected in 2012[83] and resigned from Congress in January 2013.[114] She was succeeded by Jason T. Smith.[115] In August 2012 Sowers was confirmed as Assistant Secretary for Public and Intergovernmental Affairs at the Department of Veterans Affairs.[116]

Republican primary results

Missouri's 8th district Republican primary, August 3, 2010[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jo Ann Emerson (incumbent) 47,880 65.59%
Republican Bob Parker 25,118 34.41%
Totals 72,998 100.00%

General election results

Missouri's 8th district general election, November 2, 2010[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jo Ann Emerson (incumbent) 128,499 65.56%
Democratic Tommy Sowers 56,377 28.76%
Independent Larry Bill 7,193 3.67%
Libertarian Rick Vandeven 3,930 2.01%
Totals 195,999 100.00%

External links

  • Larry Bill campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 28, 2010)
  • Jo Ann Emerson campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived November 2, 2010)
  • Bob Parker campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived September 19, 2010)
  • Tommy Sowers campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 28, 2010)

District 9

Blaine Luetkemeyer, who was re-elected as the U.S. Representative for the 9th district

The 9th district included Columbia, Hannibal and Kirksville.[117] The district's population was 92 percent white (see Race and ethnicity in the United States Census); 86 percent were high school graduates and 23 percent had received a bachelor's degree or higher. Its median income was $44,118.[118] In the 2008 presidential election the district gave 55 percent of its vote to Republican nominee John McCain and 44 percent to Democratic nominee Barack Obama.[117]

Republican Blaine Luetkemeyer, who took office in 2009, was the incumbent. Luetkemeyer was elected with 50 percent of the vote in 2008.[117] In 2010 Luetkemeyer's opponent in the general election was Libertarian Party nominee Christopher Dwyer.[119] The 2010 election in the 9th district marked the first time since 1984 that a U.S. Representative from Missouri ran unopposed in the general election.[120] Ron Burrus and Jeff Reed also ran as write-in candidates.[119] James O. Baker also sought the Republican nomination. Steven Wilson also sought the Libertarian nomination.[120]

Luetkemeyer raised $1,358,842 and spent $737,857.[121] Prior to the election FiveThirtyEight's forecast gave Luetkemeyer a 100 percent chance of winning.[122] On election day Luetkemeyer was re-elected with 77 percent of the vote to Dwyer's 22 percent.[18] Luetkemeyer was again re-elected in 2012[123] and 2014.[124]

Republican primary results

Missouri's 9th district Republican primary, August 3, 2010[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Blaine Luetkemeyer (incumbent) 59,684 82.97%
Republican James O. Baker 12,248 17.03%
Totals 71,932 100.00%

Libertarian primary results

Missouri's 9th district Libertarian primary, August 3, 2010[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Christopher Dwyer 291 55.96%
Libertarian Steven Wilson 229 44.04%
Totals 520 100.00%

General election results

Missouri's 9th district general election, November 2, 2010[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Blaine Luetkemeyer (incumbent) 162,724 77.36%
Libertarian Christopher Dwyer 46,817 22.26%
Write-in Jeff Reed 748 0.36%
Write-in Ron Burrus 69 0.03%
Totals 210,358 100.00%

External links

  • Christopher Dwyer campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 28, 2010)
  • Blaine Luetkemeyer campaign website at the Wayback Machine (archived October 28, 2010)

See also

References

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