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United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2008

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United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2008

Oregon's United States congressional districts

The United States House of Representatives elections in Oregon, 2008 were held on November 4, 2008, to determine who will represent the state of Oregon in the United States House of Representatives, coinciding with the presidential and senatorial elections. Representatives are elected for two-year terms those elected will be serving in the 111th Congress from January 3, 2009 until January 3, 2011.

Oregon has five seats in the House, apportioned according to the 2000 United States Census. Its 2007–2008 congressional delegation consisted of four Democrats and one Republican. This remains unchanged although CQ Politics had forecasted district 5 to be at some risk for the incumbent party earlier in the year.

A primary election for Democrats and Republicans was held on May 20. To be eligible for the primaries, candidates had to file for election by March 11.[1] Other parties had other procedures for nominating candidates.

District 1

Democratic incumbent David Wu has represented Oregon's 1st congressional district since 1998 and is the Democratic nominee in 2008, defeating Will Hobbs and Mark Welyczko in the primary.[2] Hobbs, a political novice, earned some attention late in the race, by winning the endorsements of major newspapers The Oregonian and Willamette Week.[3] He won 16.7% of the vote to Wu's 78.0%.[4]

In the Republican primary, Joel Haugen defeated pathologist Claude W. Chappell IV,[5] but later withdrew his acceptance of the Republican nomination after his endorsement of Democrat Barack Obama for President drew objections from Republican party leaders.[6]

Oregon's 1st congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Wu (inc.) 237,567 71.50%
Independent Joel Haugen 58,279 17.54%
Constitution Scott Semrau 14,172 4.27%
Libertarian H. Joe Tabor 10,992 3.31%
Pacific Green Chris Henry 7,128 2.15%
Write-ins 4,110 1.24%
Totals 332,248 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 2

Incumbent Republican Greg Walden has represented Oregon's 2nd congressional district since 1998 and was unopposed for the Republican nomination in 2008. In the general election, he faced Democrat Noah Lemas, a small business owner,[7] Richard Hake of the Constitution Party of Oregon and Pacific Green Party candidate Tristin Mock.[8]

Oregon's 2nd congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Greg Walden (inc.) 236,560 69.50%
Democratic Noah Lemas 87,649 25.75%
Pacific Green Tristin Mock 9,668 2.84%
Constitution Richard D. Hake 5,817 1.71%
Write-ins 685 0.20%
Totals 340,379 100.00%
Republican hold

District 3

Incumbent Democrat Earl Blumenauer has represented Oregon's 3rd congressional district since 1996 and was the Democratic nominee in 2008, defeating TV co-host John Sweeney and retired utility worker and peace activist Joseph "Lone Vet" Walsh in the primary.[2] In the general election, he faced Republican Delia Lopez, a real estate investor,[9] and Pacific Green Party candidate Michael Meo.[10]

Oregon's 3rd congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Earl Blumenauer (inc.) 254,235 74.54%
Republican Delia Lopez 71,063 20.84%
Pacific Green Michael Meo 15,063 4.42%
Write-ins 701 0.21%
Totals 341,062 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 4

Incumbent Democrat Peter DeFazio has represented Oregon's 4th congressional district since 1986 and was unopposed for the Democratic nomination in 2008.[2] He was being challenged in the general election by Constitution Party member Jaynee Germond and Pacific Green Mike Beilstein, a research chemist.[11] CQ Politics forecasted the race as 'Safe Democrat'.

Oregon's 4th congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Peter DeFazio (inc.) 275,143 82.34%
Constitution Jaynee Germond 43,133 12.91%
Pacific Green Mike Beilstein 13,162 3.94%
Write-ins 2,708 0.81%
Totals 334,146 100.00%
Democratic hold

District 5

In February 2008, Democrat Darlene Hooley, who had represented Oregon's 5th congressional district since 1996, announced that she would not seek re-election in 2008.[12] The race to replace her was expected to be one of the most competitive in the nation, since the district contained about 2,000 more Republicans than Democrats at that time.[13][14]

There were two major factors for the competitiveness of the race: first, the demographics of the district had changed dramatically. In June, there were 20,000 more registered Democrats than Republicans in the district, a net swing of 22,000 voters since February.[15] Secondly, Republican nominee Erickson won a contentious primary in which an opponent, Kevin Mannix, raised an allegation that Erickson paid for a former girlfriend's abortion. The girlfriend subsequently went public with the information, but Erickson denied knowledge of the event.[16] Mannix refused to endorse Erickson in the general election.[17]

Democratic nominee Kurt Schrader won against Republican nominee Mike Erickson, 166,070 (54.5%) to 116,418 (38.2%). Also competing were Libertarian nominee Steve Milligan, Constitution nominee Douglas Patterson, Pacific Green nominee Alex Polikoff, and Independent Sean Bates.

Oregon's 5th congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kurt Schrader 181,577 54.25%
Republican Mike Erickson 128,297 38.33%
Independent Sean Bates 6,830 2.04%
Constitution Douglas Patterson 6,558 1.96%
Pacific Green Alex Polikoff 5,272 1.58%
Libertarian Steve Milligan 4,814 1.44%
Write-ins 1,326 0.40%
Totals 334,674 100.00%
Democratic hold

References

  1. ^ "Voting and Voter Registration". Oregon Blue Book. Retrieved 2008-02-08. 
  2. ^ a b c "Erickson beats Mannix in contest turned nasty". OregonLive.com. 2008-05-21. Retrieved 2008-05-21. 
  3. ^ Holgate, Steve (May 9, 2008). "Oregon Congressional Incumbent Faces Challenge Within His Party". News Blaze. Retrieved 2008-05-23. 
  4. ^ Oregon Secretary of State unofficial election results. Retrieved May 23, 2008.
  5. ^ "Haugen for Congress". Retrieved 2008-05-21. 
  6. ^ Cole, Michelle (2008-08-30). "Joel Haugen withdraws acceptance of Republican nomination".  
  7. ^ "Noah Lemas for Congress". Retrieved 2008-05-21. 
  8. ^ "Tristin Mock for U.S. House of Representatives". Retrieved 2008-05-21. 
  9. ^ "Delia Lopez for Congress". Retrieved 2008-05-21. 
  10. ^ "Michael Meo US House of Representatives". Retrieved 2008-06-12. 
  11. ^ "Mike Beilstein US House of Representatives". Retrieved 2008-05-21. 
  12. ^ Kosseff, Jeff; Charles Pope (February 7, 2008). "Rep. Hooley will not run for re-election". The Oregonian. 
  13. ^ "Voter Registration by Congressional District: February 2008" ( 
  14. ^ Kapochunas, Rachel (February 7, 2008). "Tossup House Race Emerges as Oregon Democrat Hooley Retires". CQPolitics.com. Retrieved 2008-02-08. 
  15. ^ "Voter Registration by Congressional District: June 2008" ( 
  16. ^ Har, Janie (2008-06-23). "Oregon City woman details abortion, relationship with Mike Erickson".  
  17. ^ Kraushaar, Josh (2008-05-21). "Mannix refuses to endorse Erickson". CBSNews.com. Retrieved 2008-06-10. 

External links

  • U.S. Congress candidates for Oregon at Project Vote Smart
  • Oregon U.S. House Races from 2008 Race Tracker
  • Campaign contributions for Oregon congressional races from OpenSecrets.org
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