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Ust'-Ordynskiy Buryatskiy Avtonomnyy Okrug, Russia

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Ust'-Ordynskiy Buryatskiy Avtonomnyy Okrug, Russia



Ust-Orda Buryat Okrug (Russian: Усть-Орды́нский Буря́тский о́круг; Buryat: Усть-Ордын Буряадай округ Ust'-Ordyn Burjaadaj okrug), or Ust-Orda Buryatia, is an administrative division of Irkutsk Oblast, Russia.[1] It was a federal subject of Russia (an autonomous okrug of Irkutsk Oblast) from 1993 to January 1, 2008, when it merged with Irkutsk Oblast. It also had autonomous okrug status from September 26, 1937 to 1993. Prior to the merger, it was called Ust-Orda Buryat Autonomous Okrug (Усть-Орды́нский Буря́тский автоно́мный о́круг).

It has an area of 22,138.1 square kilometers (8,547.6 sq mi). Population: Template:Ru-census2010

The settlement of Ust-Ordynsky is the autonomous okrug's administrative center and its most populous inhabited locality.

Merger

In a referendum held on April 16, 2006, the majority of residents in Irkutsk Oblast and Ust-Orda Buryat Autonomous Okrug agreed to the unification of the two regions. According to regions' electoral commissions, 68.98% of residents of Irkutsk Oblast and 99.51% of residents in Ust-Orda Buryatia took part in the vote, making it one of the best attended plebiscites in the country since the 2003 Russian election. The merger was approved by an absolute majority of the electorate: by 89.77% in Irkutsk Oblast and by 97.79% in Ust-Orda Buryatia. The enlarged Irkutsk Oblast has officially come into existence on January 1, 2008.[2][3]

Administrative divisions

The okrug is divided into six administrative districts.

Demographics

Vital statistics

Source: Russian Federal State Statistics Service
Average population (x 1000) Live births Deaths Natural change Crude birth rate (per 1000) Crude death rate (per 1000) Natural change (per 1000)
1970 146 2,813 1,175 1,638 19.3 8.0 11.2
1975 138 3,014 1,311 1,703 21.8 9.5 12.3
1980 132 3,193 1,346 1,847 24.2 10.2 14.0
1985 132 3,546 1,397 2,149 26.9 10.6 16.3
1990 128 3,383 1,325 2,058 26.5 10.4 16.1
1991 129 3,101 1,424 1,677 24.0 11.0 13.0
1992 131 2,770 1,560 1,210 21.1 11.9 9.2
1993 132 2,379 1,742 637 18.0 13.2 4.8
1994 132 2,385 1,943 442 18.1 14.7 3.4
1995 132 2,186 1,872 314 16.5 14.2 2.4
1996 133 2,155 1,704 451 16.2 12.8 3.4
1997 134 2,010 1,787 223 15.0 13.3 1.7
1998 134 2,011 1,654 357 15.0 12.3 2.7
1999 135 2,018 1,923 95 15.0 14.3 0.7
2000 135 1,932 2,004 - 72 14.3 14.9 -0.5
2001 135 1,986 1,967 19 14.7 14.6 0.1
2002 135 2,011 2,004 7 14.9 14.9 0.1
2003 134 1,986 2,023 - 37 14.9 15.1 -0.3
2004 132 2,058 2,174 - 116 15.6 16.5 -0.9
2005 130 1,968 2,138 - 170 15.1 16.4 -1.3
2006 128 2,142 1,867 275 16.7 14.6 2.1
2007 127 2,433 1,653 780 19.1 13.0 6.1
2008 126 2,827 1,719 1,108 22.4 13.6 8.8
2009 126 2,906 1,648 1,258 23.1 13.1 10.0
2010 125 2,785 1,771 1,014 22.3 14.2 8.1

Ethnic groups

Of the 135,327 residents (as of the 2002 Census), 38 (0.02%) chose not to specify their ethnic background. Of the rest, residents identified themselves as belonging to 74 ethnic groups, including Russians (54.4%), Buryats (39.6%), Tatars (3%) and Ukrainians (0.96%)

Ethnic
group
1959 Census 1970 Census 1979 Census 1989 Census 2002 Census 2010 Census
Number  % Number  % Number  % Number  % Number  % Number  %
Buryats 44,850 33.7% 48,302 33.0% 45,436 34.4% 49,298 36.3% 53,649 39.6% 49,871 39,8%
Russians 75,099 56.4% 86,020 58.8% 76,731 58.1% 76,827 56.5% 73,646 54.4% 67,808 54,2%
Others 13,122 9.9% 12,090 8.3% 9,986 7.6% 9,745 7.2% 8,032 5.9% 7,498 6,0%

References

See also

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