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Warner Robins Air Logistics Center

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Title: Warner Robins Air Logistics Center  
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Warner Robins Air Logistics Center

Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex
Part of Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC)
Located near: Warner Robins, Georgia


Missile-damaged C-5 Galaxy receives repair of battle damage at Warner Robins.

Updating a C-130 at Warner Robins Air Logistics Center with the latest technology.

Warner-Robins ALC
Warner-Robins ALC
Coordinates
Site information
Controlled by  United States Air Force
Site history
Built 1942
In use 1942-Present
Garrison information
Past
commanders
Major General Robert H. McMahon
Garrison Air Force Material Command

The Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex (WR-ALC) performs sustainment and depot maintenance on a number of US Air Force weapon systems. Specifically it supports AC-130, C-5 Galaxy, C-17 Globemaster III, C-130 Hercules, E-8 Joint STARS, EC-130, F-15 Eagle, HC-130, HH-60 Pave Hawk, MC-130, MH-53 Pave Low, RQ-4 Global Hawk, U-2 Dragon Lady, and UH-1 Iroquois aircraft. To accomplish its mission the center employs nearly 13,000 civilians.[1]

Organization

The 78th Air Base Wing provides support facilities and equipment for all Robins Air Force Base associate units. It is responsible for logistics, medical, civil engineering, security, and morale services for a base population of nearly 40,000 personnel.

The 402d Maintenance Wing conducts depot-level management of scheduled maintenance, facilities, software, and avionics for Air Force and U.S. Department of Defense programs globally.

Members of the Aerospace Sustainment Directorate (ASD) perform program management for the following: C-130, C-5, F-15, U-2, and Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar Systems (JSTARS) E-8C aircraft; Distributed Common Ground System (DCGS); Intelligence, Information, Command and Control, Equipment and Enhancements (ICE2); RQ-4 Global Hawk; MQ-1 Predator; MQ-9 Reaper; Contractor Field Service Representatives; Special Projects, and all Special Operations Forces/Combat Search and Rescue aircraft.

History

Construction began on the Warner Robins Air Logistics Complex in mid-1941. During theater of operations.[2]

During the post-World War II draw-down the number of personnel working at the center was reduced to about 3,900. However, as the Cold War began to take shape with the Berlin Airlift and shortly after with the Korean War the center quickly ramped up its capabilities. Warner Robins personnel focused on refurbishing mothballed B-29 Superfortress aircraft for use in Korea. The center also provided material support to U.S. forces engaged in the Vietnam War. It managed B-57 Canberra, AC-119, and AC-130 aircraft. Additionally, it was responsible for most of the U.S. Air Force's airlift fleet, including the C-123 Provider, C-124 Globemaster II, C-130 Hercules, and C-141 Starlifter.[2]

More recently the center directly supported Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm by deploying some of its members to Europe and the Persian Gulf area to assist with aircraft maintenance. Currently the center provides depot maintenance on the Air Force's entire fleet of helicopters and special operations aircraft in addition to both strategic and tactical airlift aircraft and the F-15 Eagle and U-2 Dragon Lady airframes.[2]

References

Notes

  1. ^ WR-ALC Fact Sheet
  2. ^ a b c A Brief History of WR-ALC and Robins AFB
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