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1943 NFL Championship Game

1943 NFL Championship Game
1 2 3 4 Total
Washington Redskins 0 7 7 7 21
Chicago Bears 0 14 13 14 41
Date December 26, 1943
Stadium Wrigley Field
City Chicago, Illinois
Referee Ronald Gibbs
Attendance 34,320
TV/Radio in the United States
Radio Network Mutual
Radio Announcers Harry Wismer
Timeline
Previous game Next game
1942 1944

The 1943 NFL Championship Game was the 11th annual title game of the National Football League (NFL). The game was held at Wrigley Field in Chicago on December 26, 1943, and drew attendance of 34,320.[1]

The contest featured the Western Division champion Chicago Bears (who compiled an 8–1–1 regular season record) against the Eastern Division champion Washington Redskins (6–3–1). The previous week the Redskins had defeated the New York Giants by a score of 28–0 to determine the champs of the east after the teams ended the regular season with identical records. This playoff game pushed the championship back to its latest ever date, and the late-December Chicago weather caused the game to be dubbed the "Ice Bowl".[2]

The crowd was smaller than the previous year's and well off the championship game record of 48,120 set in 1938,[2] but the gross gate receipts of $120,500.50 set a record.[3] In addition to the gate, radio broadcast rights to the game were sold for $5,000.[3] This take meant that each player on the winning club took home $1,135.81 while each member of the losing team got $754.60.[3]

The Bears were led by quarterback Sid Luckman while Sammy Baugh was the quarterback for the Redskins. The Redskins were coached by Dutch Bergman.

The Chicago win marked the franchise's third championship in four seasons, their fourth since the institution of the championship game in 1933 and their sixth since the NFL was formed in 1921.[4]

Contents

  • Rosters 1
    • Starters 1.1
    • Substitutions 1.2
  • Scoring breakdown 2
  • Game statistics 3
  • References 4

Rosters

Starters

Starting lineups[1]
Bears Position Redskins
Jim Benton Left end Bob Masterson
Dom Sigillo Left tackle Lou Rymkus
Dan Fortmann Left guard Clyde Shugart
Bulldog Turner Center George Smith
George Musso Right guard Steve Slivinski
Al Hoptowit Right tackle Joe Pasqua
George Wilson Right end Joe Aguirre
Bob Snyder Quarterback Ray Hare
Harry Clarke Left halfback George Cafego
Dante Magnani Right halfback Frank Seno
Bob Masters Fullback Andy Farkas

Substitutions

Bears substitutions: Pool, Berry, Steinkemper, Babartsky, Mundee, Ippolito, Logan, Matuza, McLean, Luckman, Famighetti, Nagurski, McEnulty, Nolting and Vodicka.

Redskins substitutions: Piasecky, Lapka, Wilkin, Zeno, Fiorentino, Leon, Hayden, Baugh, Seymour, Moore, Gibson, Akins and Stasica.

Scoring breakdown

  • First Quarter
    • no scoring
  • Second Quarter
  • Third Quarter
    • CHI – Magnani 36 yard pass from Luckman (Snyder kick); 21–7 CHI
    • CHI – Magnani 66 yard pass from Luckman (kick failed); 27–7 CHI
    • WAS – Farkas 17 yard pass from Baugh (Masterson kick); 27–14 CHI
  • Fourth Quarter
    • CHI – Benton 26 yard pass from Luckman (Snyder kick); 34–14 CHI
    • CHI – Clarke 10 yard pass from Luckman (Snyder kick); 41–14 CHI
    • WAS – Aguirre 25 yard pass from Baugh (Aguirre kick); 41–21 CHI

Game statistics

Bears Game Statistics[5][6] Redskins
12 First downs 11
44–168 Rushes–yards 27–45
276 Passing yards 182
14–27–0 Passes 10–22–4
66 Punt return yards 37
5–32 Punts 5–48.4
21 Kickoff return yards 167
0–0 Fumbles–lost 1–0
9–81 Penalties–yards 2–20

References

  1. ^ a b "Luckman Restores Bears to Pro Grid Title".  
  2. ^ a b Ice Bowl' Won't Do Big Business"'".  
  3. ^ a b c "Each Bear Player Receives $1,135 for Victory Game".  
  4. ^ "Bear Defeat Reskins for Pro Title on Luckman's Five Touchdown Passes".  
  5. ^ "Boxscore".  
  6. ^ Kuechle, Oliver E. (December 27, 1943). "Bear Bury Skins; Sid Luckman Stars".  
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