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Ajmalicine

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Ajmalicine

Ajmalicine
Systematic (IUPAC) name
(19α)-16,17-didehydro- 19-methyloxayohimban- 16-carboxylic acid methyl ester
Clinical data
Legal status
  • Prescription only
Routes Oral
Identifiers
CAS number  N
ATC code None
PubChem
ChemSpider  Y
ChEMBL  Y
Chemical data
Formula C21H24N2O3 
Mol. mass 352.43 g/mol
 N   

Ajmalicine, also known as δ-yohimbine or raubasine, is an antihypertensive drug used in the treatment of high blood pressure.[1] It has been marketed under numerous brand names including Card-Lamuran, Circolene, Cristanyl, Duxil, Duxor, Hydroxysarpon, Iskedyl, Isosarpan, Isquebral, Lamuran, Melanex, Saltucin Co, Salvalion, and Sarpan.[1] It is also an alkaloid found naturally in various plants such as Rauwolfia spp., Catharanthus roseus, and Mitragyna speciosa.[1][2][3]

Ajmalicine is structurally related to yohimbine, rauwolscine, and other yohimban derivatives. Like corynanthine, it acts as a α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist with preferential actions over α2-adrenergic receptors, underlying its hypotensive rather than hypertensive effects.[1][4]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d Wink, Michael; Roberts, M. W. (1998). Alkaloids: biochemistry, ecology, and medicinal applications. New York: Plenum Press. ISBN . 
  2. ^ Kurz WG, Chatson KB, Constabel F, et al. (May 1981). "Alkaloid Production in Catharanthus roseus Cell Cultures VIII1". Planta Medica 42 (5): 22–31. PMID 17401876. doi:10.1055/s-2007-971541. 
  3. ^ León F, Habib E, Adkins JE, Furr EB, McCurdy CR, Cutler SJ (July 2009). "Phytochemical characterization of the leaves of Mitragyna speciosa grown in U.S.A". Natural Product Communications 4 (7): 907–10. PMID 19731590. 
  4. ^ Roquebert J, Demichel P (October 1984). "Inhibition of the alpha 1 and alpha 2-adrenoceptor-mediated pressor response in pithed rats by raubasine, tetrahydroalstonine and akuammigine". European Journal of Pharmacology 106 (1): 203–5. PMID 6099269. doi:10.1016/0014-2999(84)90698-8. 
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