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Australian federal election, 1993

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Title: Australian federal election, 1993  
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Subject: 1993 in Australia, Liberal Party of Australia, John Hewson, Keating Government, Australian federal election, 2007
Collection: 1993 Elections in Australia, 1993 in Australia, Federal Elections in Australia
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Australian federal election, 1993

Australian federal election, 1993

13 March 1993 (1993-03-13)

All 147 seats in the Australian House of Representatives
74 seats were needed for a majority in the House
40 (of the 76) seats in the Australian Senate
  First party Second party
 
Leader Paul Keating John Hewson
Leader since 19 December 1991 (1991-12-19) 3 April 1990 (1990-04-03)
Leader's seat Blaxland Wentworth
Last election 78 seats 69 seats
Seats won 80 seats 65 seats
Seat change Increase2 Decrease4
Popular vote 5,436,421 5,133,033
Percentage 51.44% 48.56%
Swing Increase1.54% Decrease1.54%

 

 

Prime Minister before election

Paul Keating
Labor

Elected Prime Minister

Paul Keating
Labor

Federal elections were held in Australia on 13 March 1993. All 147 seats in the House of Representatives, and 40 seats in the 76-member Senate, were up for election. The incumbent Australian Labor Party government led by Prime Minister of Australia Paul Keating defeated the opposition Liberal Party of Australia led by John Hewson with coalition partner the National Party of Australia led by Tim Fischer.

Results

Seats changing hands

Seat Pre-1993 Swing Post-1993
Party Member Margin Margin Member Party
Adelaide, SA   Labor Bob Catley 3.7 3.0 1.3 Trish Worth Liberal  
Bass, Tas   Liberal Warwick Smith 4.3 4.5 0.0 Silvia Smith Labor  
Corinella, Vic   Liberal Russell Broadbent 0.7 4.4 3.7 Alan Griffin Labor  
Cowan, WA   Labor Carolyn Jakobsen 0.9 1.8 0.9 Richard Evans Liberal  
Dunkley, Vic   Liberal Frank Ford 1.2 1.6 0.6 Bob Chynoweth Labor  
Franklin, Tas   Liberal Bruce Goodluck 2.1 9.5 7.4 Harry Quick Labor  
Gilmore, NSW date=May 2013}} image1 = leader1 = Paul Keating df=yes|1991|12|19}} party1 = Australian Labor Party leaders_seat1 = Blaxland last_election1 = 78 seats seats1 = 80 seats seat_change1 = 2 popular_vote1 = 5,436,421 percentage1 = 51.44% swing1 = 1.54% image2 = leader2 = John Hewson df=yes|1990|4|3}} party2 = Liberal/National coalition leaders_seat2 = Wentworth last_election2 = 69 seats seats2 = 65 seats seat_change2 = 4 popular_vote2 = 5,133,033 percentage2 = 48.56% swing2 = 1.54% title = Prime Minister before_election = Paul Keating before_party = Australian Labor Party after_election = Paul Keating after_party = Australian Labor Party

}} Federal elections were held in Australia on 13 March 1993. All 147 seats in the House of Representatives, and 40 seats in the 76-member Senate, were up for election. The incumbent Australian Labor Party government led by Prime Minister of Australia Paul Keating defeated the opposition Liberal Party of Australia led by John Hewson with coalition partner the National Party of Australia led by Tim Fischer.

Results

|44.92}} 37.10}} 7.17}} 3.10}} }}

|51.44}} 48.56}} }}

|54.42}} 44.22}} 1.36}} }}

Seats changing hands

Seat Pre-1993 Swing Post-1993
Party Member Margin Margin Member Party
Adelaide, SA   Labor Bob Catley 3.7 3.0 1.3 Trish Worth Liberal  
Bass, Tas   Liberal Warwick Smith 4.3 4.5 0.0 Silvia Smith Labor  
Corinella, Vic   Liberal Russell Broadbent 0.7 4.4 3.7 Alan Griffin Labor  
Cowan, WA   Labor Carolyn Jakobsen 0.9 1.8 0.9 Richard Evans Liberal  
Dunkley, Vic   Liberal Frank Ford 1.2 1.6 0.6 Bob Chynoweth Labor  
Franklin, Tas   Liberal Bruce Goodluck 2.1 9.5 7.4 Harry Quick Labor  
Gilmore, NSW   National John Sharp 4.4 1.1 0.5 Peter Knott Labor  
Grey, SA   Labor Lloyd O'Neil 6.5 4.3 2.1
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