Bandaid

This article is about the adhesive bandage. For the musical ensemble "Band Aid", see Band Aid (band). For other uses, see Band Aid.

Band-Aid is a brand name of American pharmaceutical and medical devices giant Johnson & Johnson's line of adhesive bandages and related products. It has also become a genericized trademark for any adhesive bandage in the United States, Australia, Brazil, Canada and India.[1]

The term "band-aid" has also entered usage as both a noun and verb describing a temporary fix. (e.g. "Band-aid solutions were used to fix the leak.")

History

The Band-Aid was invented in 1920 by Johnson & Johnson employee Earle Dickson for his wife Josephine, who frequently cut and burned herself while cooking.[2] The prototype allowed her to dress her wounds without assistance. Dickson passed the idea on to his employer, which went on to produce and market the product as the Band-Aid. Dickson had a successful career at Johnson & Johnson, rising to vice president before his retirement in 1957.

The original Band-Aids were handmade and not very popular. By 1924, Johnson & Johnson introduced a machine that produced sterilized Band-Aids. In World War II, millions were shipped overseas, helping popularize the product.

In 1951, the first decorative Band-Aids were introduced. They continue to be a commercial success today, with such themes such as Superman, Spider-Man, Hello Kitty, Rocket Power, Rugrats, smiley faces, Barbie, Dora the Explorer, and Batman.

Related J&J products

Johnson & Johnson also manufactures Band-Aid liquid bandages, Scar Healing bandages, and Burn-Aid, burn gel-impregnated bandages. Their newest products include Active Flex bandages and waterproof Tough Strips.

To protect the name their trademark, Johnson & Johnson always refer to their products as "Band-Aid brand" and not just Band-Aids.

Manufacturing facilities are located in Brazil and China.

References

External links

  • Band-Aid Brand Official Website
  • Band-Aid Brand History
  • Johnson & Johnson First Aid Website
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