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Biogeochemical cycle

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Title: Biogeochemical cycle  
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Subject: Biogeochemical cycle, Mercury cycle, Oxygen cycle, Landscape ecology, Biogeography
Collection: Biogeochemical Cycle, Biogeography, Geochemistry
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Biogeochemical cycle

A commonly cited example is the water cycle.

In

  1. ^ a b c Prentice Hall Biology.
  2. ^ a b c Matter cycles at Lenntech.
  3. ^ Mercury Cycling in the Environment. USGS. October 17, 2008.
  4. ^ A. G. Georgiadi, et al. 3.2. Biogeochemical Cycles.
  5. ^ Distributed Active Archive Center for Biogeochemical Data.

References

See also

Global biogeochemical cycles critical for life
Diagram of the nitrogen cycle
Diagram of the water cycle
Diagram of the carbon cycle
Diagram of the oxygen cycle
Diagram of the phosphorus cycle

As biogeochemical cycles describe the movements of substances on the entire globe, the study of these is inherently multidiciplinary. The carbon cycle may be related to research in ecology and atmospheric sciences.[4] Biochemical dynamics would also be related to the fields of geology and pedology (soil study).[5]

Biogeochemical cycles always involve hot equilibrium states: a balance in the cycling of the element between compartments. However, overall balance may involve compartments distributed on a global scale.

There are many biogeochemical cycles that are currently being studied for the first time as climate change and human impacts are drastically changing the speed, intensity, and balance of these relatively unknown cycles. These newly studied biogeochemical cycles include

The most well-known and important biogeochemical cycles, for example, include

Important cycles

The term "biogeochemical" tells us that biological, geological and chemical factors are all involved. The circulation of chemical nutrients like carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus, calcium, and water etc. through the biological and physical world are known as biogeochemical cycles. In effect, the element is recycled, although in some cycles there may be places (called reservoirs) where the element is accumulated or held for a long period of time (such as an ocean or lake for water).[1][2]

' [2][1]

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