World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Brian Hartline

Brian Hartline
Hartline with the Dolphins in 2009
No. 82     Miami Dolphins
Wide Receiver
Personal information
Date of birth: (1986-11-22) November 22, 1986 (age 27)
Place of birth: Canton, Ohio
Height: 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)Weight: 199 lb (90 kg)
Career information
High school: Canton (OH) GlenOak
College: Ohio State
NFL Draft: 2009 / Round: 4 / Pick: 108
Debuted in 2009 for the Miami Dolphins
Career history

Roster status: Active
Career highlights and awards
  • Miami Dolphins single game receiving yds record (253)
Career NFL statistics as of Week 9, 2013

Brian Jack Hartline[1] (born November 22, 1986) is an American football wide receiver for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League. He is the brother of Mike Hartline, a former quarterback for the Indianapolis Colts & New England Patriots.

Hartline attended GlenOak High School, where he both played football and ran track for four years. He began his football career as a quarterback, but in the fourth game of his sophomore year switched positions to wide receiver.[2]

College career

Hartline redshirted his freshman year, but played in all 13 contests in 2006. In 2007, Hartline played an integral part in getting the Buckeyes to the 2008 BCS National Championship Game, averaging 13.3 yards per reception with 52 catches for 694 yards.[3] In 2008, his final season, Hartline averaged 22.8 yards per reception with 21 catches for 479 yards.[3]

He graduated from Ohio State in June 2009 with a degree in Communications, but elected to forego his final season of eligibility to enter the 2009 NFL Draft.[4]

Professional career

Miami Dolphins

2009 season

Hartline was drafted by the Miami Dolphins in the fourth round (108th overall) of the 2009 NFL Draft. On October 4, 2009, Hartline caught his first career touchdown on a 2 yard pass from Chad Henne. Hartline finished his rookie season with 31 receptions and 506 receiving yards with three touchdown receptions plus a rushing touchdown on a 16-yard play against the Pittsburgh Steelers. Although he finished third on the team in receiving yards, he led the team in receiving touchdowns.

2010 season

After a solid rookie season in which he started every game, in the 2010 season Hartline started only 12 games, although despite this, he had a better season statistically, with 43 receptions for 615 yards and 1 touchdown. He also rushed for 27 yards on 2 carries.[5]

2011 season

After the release of Ted Ginn Jr. in the 2011 off season, Hartline cemented his place as a starter, again starting in every game of the season, like in his rookie year.[6] He recorded stats of 549 yards from 35 receptions, thrown by Chad Henne at the start of the season, but after the former Michigan QB's injury, backup Matt Moore took over, leading to Henne's release in 2012.

2012 season

"Are you shitting me?".

Hartline, after learning from a reporter how many yards (253) he got against the Cardinals in his record breaking performance.[7]

Despite struggling with injuries and illnesses during the off-season and training camp,[8] Hartline played in the season opener against the Houston Texans and became the team's number one receiver with Brandon Marshall's trade. In a Week 4 loss against the Arizona Cardinals, he broke the franchise record for receiving yards in a game with 253. He called the record "bittersweet".[9] After that week 4 performance, Hartline led the NFL in receiving yards. Hartline eclipsed 1,000 receiving yards, becoming the eighth receiver in Dolphins franchise history to accomplish the milestone.[10]

2013 season

During the offseason, Hartline stayed with the Dolphins, signing a 5-year, $31 million contract, with $12.5 million guaranteed.

Dolphins franchise records

References

External links

  • ESPN.com
  • Brian Hartline at Scout.com
  • Brian Hartline at MiamiDolphins.com
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.