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Canals of Hering

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Canals of Hering

Canals of Hering
The canal of Hering leads to the bile ductule
Details
Latin Ductulus bilifer
Dorlands
/Elsevier
c_04/12207684
Anatomical terminology

The Canals of Hering, or intrahepatic bile ductules, are part of the outflow system of exocrine bile product from the liver.

Structure

They are found between the bile canaliculi and interlobular bile ducts near the outer edge of a classic liver lobule.[1][2]

Histology

Histologically, the cells of the ductule are described as simple cuboidal epithelium, lined partially by cholangiocytes and hepatocytes. They may not be readily visible but can be differentially stained by cytokeratins CK19 and CK7.

Clinical relevance

The Canals of Hering are destroyed early in biliary cirrhosis and may be primary sites of scarring in [3]

History

They are named for Ewald Hering.[4]

References

  1. ^ Ross, M.H. & Pawlina, W. 2003. Histology: A Text and Atlas, 4th Edition. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia.
  2. ^ Gartner, L.P. & Hiatt, J.L. 2000. Color Atlas of Histology, 3rd Edition. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia.
  3. ^ Saxena, R. & Theise, N. 2004. Canals of Hering: Recent Insights and Current Knowledge, Semin Liver Dis 24: 43-48.
  4. ^ Hering E. Uber den Bau der Wirbelthierleber. Archiv fur mikroskopische Anatomie 1867;3:88–118
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