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Corbeil-Essonnes

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Title: Corbeil-Essonnes  
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Corbeil-Essonnes

Corbeil-Essonnes
The town Hall of Corbeil-Essonnes
The town Hall of Corbeil-Essonnes
Coat of arms of Corbeil-Essonnes
Coat of arms
Location (in red) within Paris inner and outer suburbs
Location (in red) within Paris inner and outer suburbs
Coordinates:
Country France
Region Île-de-France
Department Essonne
Arrondissement Évry
Canton Corbeil-Essonnes-Est and Corbeil-Essonnes-Ouest
Intercommunality Seine-Essonne
Government
 • Mayor (2010-14) Jean-Pierre Bechter (UMP)
Area1 11.01 km2 (4.25 sq mi)
Population (2007)2 41,308
 • Density 3,800/km2 (9,700/sq mi)
INSEE/Postal code 91174 / 
Elevation 32–92 m (105–302 ft)

1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Corbeil-Essonnes (French pronunciation: ​) on the River Seine is a commune in the southern suburbs of Paris, France. It is located 28.3 km (17.6 mi) from the center of Paris.

Although neighboring Évry is the official seat of the Arrondissement of Évry, the sub-prefecture building and administration are located inside the commune of Corbeil-Essonnes.

History

Traces of human presence in the area date to the Palaeolithic and Neolithic ages; later it was a Gallo-Roman settlement on the main road from Paris to Sens. The name Corbeil is derived from the Latin Corbulium, from the Gaulish cor beel, meaning "holy house". Since the time of Aymon, comte de Corbeil (died 957), to the 12th century it was the chief town of a powerful county, which passed to Mauger, son of Richard I of Normandy.

William de Corbeil (died 1136) became archbishop of Canterbury, but nothing is known for certain about his parentage. The Gothic church was built in the tenth century and rebuilt in the fifteenth century. Before the expulsion of the Jews Corbeil had a flourishing Jewish community, which numbered thirteenth-century scholars Isaac ben Joseph of Corbeil and Perez ben Elijah. Peter of Corbeil (died 1222) was the teacher of Lotario de' Conti, who became pope as Innocent III.

Representatives of the king of France signed two treaties of Corbeil in the town, the Treaty of Corbeil (1258) between France and Aragon and the Treaty of Corbeil (1326) between France and Scotland.

Corbeil was besieged by the Duke of Burgundy in 1418. The Protestants of France attacked it in 1562 amidst the religious war called the First Civil War. In 1590 General Alessandro Farnese, who had come to the assistance of the Catholics in France, fought at Corbeil.

The commune of Corbeil-Essonnes was created on 10 August 1951 by the merger of the commune of Corbeil with the commune of Essonnes. The commune town hall (mairie) is located in Corbeil.

Inhabitants of Corbeil-Essonnes are known as Corbeil-Essonnois.

Economy

In the 19th century, Corbeil-Essonnes was a centre of the flour-milling industry; Essonnes also had notable papermills.

Today, Altis Semiconductor is headquartered here and operates a fabrication plant. The 55 hectare site includes 25000 square meters of clean rooms and a design center. Until 2010 this fab was a joint venture between IBM and Infineon.

Transport

Corbeil-Essonnes is served by Corbeil-Essonnes station which is

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