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Cyst

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Title: Cyst  
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Subject: Spermatocele, Calcifying odontogenic cyst, Chloracne, Fish diseases and parasites, Cysts
Collection: Cysts, Gross Pathology
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Cyst

Cyst
Classification and external resources
Specialty Pathology, general surgery
MedlinePlus 007675
MeSH D003560

A cyst is a closed sac, having a distinct membrane and division compared to the nearby tissue. Hence, it is a cluster of cells that have grouped together to form a sac (not unlike the manner in which water molecules group together, forming a bubble); however, the distinguishing aspect of a cyst is that the cells forming the "shell" of such a sac are distinctly abnormal (in both appearance and behaviour) when compared to all surrounding cells for that given location. It may contain air, fluids, or semi-solid material. A collection of pus is called an abscess, not a cyst. Once formed, a cyst may sometimes resolve on its own. When a cyst fails to resolve it may need to be removed by surgery but this will depend on what type of cyst it is and where in the body it has formed.

Contents

  • Types 1
    • Cystic fibrosis 1.1
  • Cystic neoplasm 2
  • Treatment 3
  • Related structures 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Types

The aneurysmal bone cyst is not a cyst but a neoplasm, more specifically an aggressive lesion with radiographic cystic appearance.[5]

Cystic fibrosis

Despite being described in 1938 as the microscopic appearance of cysts in the pancreas,[6] cystic fibrosis is an example of a genetic disorder whose name is related to fibrosis of the cystic duct (which serves the gallbladder) and does not involve actual cysts.[7]

This is just one example of how the Greek root cyst-, which simply means a fluid-filled sac, is also found in medical terms that relate to the urinary bladder and the gallbladder but that have nothing to do with cysts.

Cystic neoplasm

Most cysts in the body are benign (dysfunctional) tumors, the result of plugged ducts or other natural body outlets for secretions. However sometimes these masses are considered neoplasm:

Treatment

Treatment ranges from simple enucleation of the cyst to curettage to resection. There are cysts, e.g., buccal bifurcation cyst with self-resolation nature, in which close observation only can be employed unless the cyst is infected and symptomatic.[1]

Related structures

A pseudocyst is collection without a distinct membrane.

A syrinx in the spinal cord or brainstem is sometimes inaccurately referred to as a cyst.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b
  2. ^ Ceruminous gland"
  3. ^ Parapelvic cyst
  4. ^ Pericardial cyst
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^

External links

  • "Cyst Symptoms and Causes" by Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD and William C. Shiel, Jr., MD, FACP, FACR.
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