World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Daniel and Companions

Saint Daniel and Companions
Franciscan Martyrs
Died October 10, 1227(1227-10-10)
Ceuta, Spain
Venerated in Roman Catholicism
Canonized 1516 by Leo X
Feast October 13

Saint Daniel and Companions (died October 10, 1227) are venerated as martyrs by the Catholic Church. They were Friars Minor killed at Ceuta.[1]

History

The martyrdom of St. Berard and his companions in 1219 had inflamed many of the religious of the Order of Friars Minor with the desire of preaching the Gospel in non-Christian lands; and in 1227, the year following St. Francis's death, six religious of Tuscany, Agnellus (Agnello), Samuel, Donulus, Leo, Hugolinus (Ugolino), and Nicholas, petitioned Brother Elias of Cortona, then vicar-general of the Order, for permission to preach the Gospel to the Muslims of Magreb.

The six missionaries went first to Spain, where they were joined by Daniel, Minister Provincial of Calabria, who became their superior. They set sail from Spain and on 20 September reached the coast of Africa, where they remained for a few days in a small village inhabited mostly by Christian merchants just beyond the walls of the Saracen city of Ceuta.

Finally, very early on Sunday morning, they entered the city, and immediately began to preach the Gospel and to denounce Islam. They were soon apprehended and brought before the sultan who, thinking that they were mad, ordered them to be cast into prison. Here they remained until the following Sunday when they were again brought before the sultan, who, by promises and threats, endeavoured in vain to make them deny the Christian religion. They were all condemned to death. Each one approached Daniel, the superior, to ask his blessing and permission to die for Christ. They were all beheaded.

St. Daniel and his companions were canonized by Leo X in 1516.

Their feast is kept in the Franciscan Order on the thirteenth of October.

References

  1. ^ Father Candide Chalippe (1 June 2007). The Life and Legends of Saint Francis of Assisi. Echo Library. pp. 164–.  

External links


 

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.