Desperately seeking susan

Desperately Seeking Susan
File:Desperately Seeking Susan movie poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Susan Seidelman
Produced by Sarah Pillsbury
Midge Sanford
Written by Leora Barish
Uncredited:
Craig Bolotin
Starring Rosanna Arquette
Aidan Quinn
Madonna
Robert Joy
Laurie Metcalf
Music by Thomas Newman
Cinematography Edward Lachman
Editing by Andrew Mondshein
Studio Orion Pictures
Distributed by Orion Pictures
Release date(s) March 29, 1985 (1985-03-29)
Running time 104 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $4.5 million
Box office $27,398,584[1]

Desperately Seeking Susan is a 1985 American comedy-drama film directed by Susan Seidelman and starring Rosanna Arquette and Madonna.

Plot

Roberta (Rosanna Arquette) is an unfulfilled suburban housewife living in Fort Lee, New Jersey who is fascinated with a woman she only knows about by reading messages to and from her in the personals section of a New York City tabloid. This fascination reaches a peak when one such ad with the headline "Desperately Seeking Susan" proposes a rendezvous in Battery Park with the man who regularly seeks her. Roberta goes to Battery Park too, gets a glimpse of the woman (Madonna), and in a series of events involving mistaken identity, amnesia, and other farcical elements, Roberta goes from voyeur to participant in an Alice in Wonderland-style plot, ostensibly motivated by the search for a pair of stolen Egyptian earrings.

Cast

Awards and reviews

Rosanna Arquette won a BAFTA Award for her portrayal of Roberta; the fact that the award was for a "supporting role" reflected the surge in popularity that Madonna was experiencing at the time, since in terms of billing, number of scenes, lines of dialogue, and the plot, Arquette was actually the film's lead. She was nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Actress in a Comedy or Musical. Madonna also received positive reviews for her portrayal of Susan.[2] In her review for the New Yorker, critic Pauline Kael praised Madonna's performance as "an indolent, trampy goddess."

The New York Times film critic Vincent Canby named the film as one of the 10 best films of 1985.[3]

Soundtrack

Desperately Seeking Susan (Soundtrack)
Film score by George Doering, Rick Cox, Dan Greco, Michael Fischer, Thomas Newman
Released 1993 (1993)
Recorded 1985
Genre Instrumental / Score
Label Varèse Sarabande

Desperately Seeking Susan (soundtrack) features the original score for the film Desperately Seeking Susan with Madonna and Rosanna Arquette. The soundtrack was released on both vinyl and CD together with the soundtrack to the film Making Mr. Right. The soundtrack does not feature any of the other songs in the film including Madonna's "Into the Groove" which can be found on the European 1985 re-release of her Like a Virgin album. The film captures the feel of the underground Bohemian/New Wave scene of the early to mid-1980s New York City, a scene that in real life helped Madonna get her big break in the music business. Madonna recorded a song for the movie, titled "Desperately Seeking Susan". It ended up not being used in the film, and a demo she just finished at the time called "Into the Groove" was used instead. The demo version can only be heard in the movie. The song was a huge commercial success but was not included on the film's soundtrack, despite being heard in the film. The music video for "Into the Groove" consists of clips from the film compiled by Doug Dowdle of Parallax Productions.

Track listing

Desperately Seeking Susan - Music composed by Thomas Newman
  1. "Leave Atlantic City!"
  2. "Port Authority by Night"
  3. "New York City by Day"
  4. "Through the Viewscope"
  5. "St. Mark's Place"
  6. "A Key and a Picture Of"
  7. "Battery Park / Amnesia"
  8. "Jail / Port Authority by Day"
  9. "Rain"
  10. "Running With Birds in Cages"
  11. "Trouble Almost"
Making Mr. Right - Music composed and performed by Chaz Jankel
  1. "Chemtech Promo Video"
  2. "Ulysses' Escape"
  3. "Night Visit"
  4. "Frankie's Drive"
  5. "Ulysses"
  6. "In the Lab"
  7. "Sondra and Jeff"
  8. "Mr. Right"
  9. "Wedding Reception"
  10. "Parting Glance"

Songs that appear in the film but not on the released soundtrack:

  • There are two versions of the opening scene; one version opens with "The Shoop Shoop Song" and one version opens with "One Fine Day". "One Fine Day" was used for the European version where licencing prevented the use of the "Shoop Shoop Song" (as explained on the 1996 DVD commentary).

Production

The filmmakers had initially wanted Diane Keaton and Goldie Hawn to play the roles of Roberta and Susan, but the director decided to cast newcomers Rosanna Arquette and Madonna instead and the studio wanted the film to have younger actors in order to appeal to younger filmgoers. Bruce Willis was up for the role of "Dez" and Melanie Griffith was up for the part of "Susan". Madonna barely beat out Ellen Barkin and Jennifer Jason Leigh for the part of Susan. Suzanne Vega also auditioned for the role of Susan, but was passed over.

The Statue of Liberty can be seen in the film when it was still covered in scaffolding during its two-year renovation. The DVD commentary track for the film (recorded in 1996) noted that after Madonna's first screen test, the producers asked her to take four weeks of acting lessons and get screen-tested again. Although the second screen test was not much of an improvement, the director still wanted her for the role, as much for her presence and sense of style as for anything else.

Costume designer Santo Loquasto designed Susan's pyramid jacket.

The film was inspired in part by the 1974 film, Rebecca.

The movie was filmed during the late summer and early fall in 1984, early in Madonna's rise to popularity, and was intended to be an R-rated feature. However, following the success of the singer's 1984–85 hits "Like a Virgin" and "Material Girl", the film was trimmed in content by Orion Pictures to get a PG-13 rating.[5] in order to market the film to Madonna's teenage fan base.

The interior/exterior shots of The Magic Club were filmed in Harlem. Some of the scenes were filmed in Danceteria, a club that Madonna frequented and which gave her a start in the music business.

Stage musical

The film has been developed into a stage musical which received its world premiere at London's Steven Houghton as Alex.

Despite a star-studded opening night, the musical was critically mauled, and announced its final performance just thirteen days after opening night for December 15, 2007, losing over £3.5 million. A new production of the musical produced by Toho Co. opened at the Theater Creation in Tokyo, Japan on January 6, 2009 directed and translated by G2, where it received glowing, 4-star reviews.

Librettist Edinburgh Festival Fringe where it received 5-star reviews.

See also

References

External links

  • Internet Movie Database
  • AllRovi
  • Box Office Mojo
  • Rotten Tomatoes
  • Desperately Seeking Susan - The Musical
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