World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Dorsal respiratory group

Article Id: WHEBN0000640148
Reproduction Date:

Title: Dorsal respiratory group  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Ventral respiratory group, Apneustic center, Medulla oblongata, Control of ventilation, Respiratory physiology
Collection: Neuroanatomy
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Dorsal respiratory group

Dorsal respiratory group
Section of the medulla oblongata at about the middle of the olive. (Dorsal respiratory group not labeled, but spinal tract labeled at center right.)
Dorlands
/Elsevier
g_12/12402978
Anatomical terms of neuroanatomy

The dorsal respiratory group (DRG) is located in the dorsomedial region of the medulla, and is composed of cells in the solitary tract nucleus. The DRG is one of two known respiratory neuron localizations, with the other being the ventral respiratory group. The DRG is found in many types of fish and mammals.[1]

Respiratory effects

The DRG is involved in the generation of respiratory rhythm, and is primarily responsible for the generation of inspiration. It is stimulated via the apneustic centre in the lower pons and is also a part of the solitary tract, which is responsible for appropriating responses to sensory information from chemoreceptors and mechanoreceptors in humans. It is inhibited by the Pneumotaxic centre.

Inspiration begins when cells of the solitary tract nucleus (along with cells of the ventral respiratory group) begin a steady increase in firing, leading to contraction of the respiratory muscles. When neurons in the DRG fire, impulses travel down the phrenic and intercostal nerves to stimulate the diaphragm and external intercostal muscles. The thoracic cavity expands and air rushes into the lungs due to the negative pressure, producing inspiration. When the cells stop firing, the inspiratory muscles relax, inspiration ceases, and exhalation begins.

The rhythm of the DRG produces a respiratory rate of 12-16 breaths per minute in humans. Inspiration usually lasts approximately 2 seconds, and expiration lasts about 3 seconds. The normal inspiration rate and rhythm is called eupnea, and difficult respiration is termed dyspnea.

See also

References

  1. ^ Kolesnikova, EE (2011). "Role of glutamate and GABA in mechanisms underlying respiratory control". Neurophysiology (Bogomolets Institute of Physiology, Kiev, Ukraine) 42 (4): 294–304.  

Berne, Robert M.; Levy, Matthew N.; Koeppen, Bruce M.; Stanton, Bruce A. (2004). Physiology, 5th edition. St. Louis, MO:



 

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.