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FIBA Suproleague

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FIBA Suproleague

Main article: Euroleague Basketball
FIBA SuproLeague 2000–01
SuproLeague
League FIBA SuproLeague
Sport Basketball
Season
Season MVP United States Nate Huffman (Maccabi Tel Aviv)
Top scorer Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Miroslav Berić (Partizan Belgrade)
Final Four
Final Four champions Israel Maccabi Tel Aviv
  Runners-up Greece Panathinaikos Athens
Final Four MVP Slovenia Ariel McDonald (Maccabi Tel Aviv)
FIBA SuproLeague seasons
← FIBA Euroleague 1999–00

FIBA SuproLeague was the FIBA professional club basketball Champions' Cup for the 2000–01 season. Up until that season, there was one cup, the FIBA European Champions' Cup (which is now called the Euroleague), though in this season of 2000–01, the leading European teams split into two competitions: the FIBA SuproLeague and Euroleague Basketball Company's Euroleague 2000–01.

European Champions' Cup teams divided

The Euroleague (or historically called, the European Champions' Cup) was originally established by FIBA and it operated under its umbrella from 1958 until the summer of 2000, concluding with the 1999–00 season. That was when Euroleague Basketball Company was created.

Amazingly, FIBA had never trademarked the "Euroleague" name and Euroleague Basketball simply used it without any legal ramifications because FIBA had no legal recourse to do anything about it, so they had to find a new name for their league. Thus, the following 2000–2001 season started with 2 separate top European professional club basketball competitions: the FIBA SuproLeague (previously known as the FIBA Euroleague) and the brand new Euroleague 2000–01 season.

The rift in European professional club basketball initially showed no signs of letting up. Top clubs were also split between the two leagues: Panathinaikos, Maccabi Tel Aviv, CSKA Moscow and Efes Pilsen stayed with FIBA, while Olympiacos Piraeus, Kinder Bologna, Real Madrid, FC Barcelona, Baskonia and Benetton Treviso joined Euroleague Basketball.

Format

The first phase was a regular season, in which the twenty competing teams were drawn into two groups, each containing ten teams. Each team played every other team in its group at home and away, resulting in 18 games for each team. The top 8 teams in each group advanced to the Round of 16, and the winners of this round advanced to the Quarter-finals. Both of the rounds were played in a Best-of-three playoff System. The winning teams of the Quarter-finals qualified to the Final Four, which was held in the Palais Omnisports de Paris-Bercy, Paris on 10–13 in May 2001.

Regular Season

Group A

Team Pld W L Diff
1. Greece Panathinaikos 18 13 5 113
2. Russia CSKA Moscow 18 12 6 53
3. Croatia Osiguranje Split 18 12 6 28
4. Turkey Ülkerspor 18 11 7 62
5. Germany ALBA Berlin 18 9 9 31
6. France ASVEL Villeurbanne 18 9 9 13
7. Lithuania Rytas Vilnius 18 7 11 −14
8. Poland Śląsk Wrocław 18 7 11 −14
9. Italy Montepaschi Mens Sana 18 6 12 −89
10. Israel Maccabi Raanana 18 4 14 −183

Group B

Team Pld W L Diff
1. Israel Maccabi Tel Aviv 18 15 3 273
2. Turkey Efes Pilsen 18 13 5 92
3. Serbia and Montenegro KK Partizan 18 11 7 −25
4. Greece Iraklis BC 18 10 8 −10
5. Italy Scavolini Pesaro 18 9 9 76
6. France EB Pau-Orthez 18 9 9 54
7. Belgium Telindus Oostende 18 8 10 −66
8. Slovenia KK Krka 18 7 11 −86
9. Germany Bayer 04 Leverkusen 18 6 12 −65
10. Sweden Plannja Basket 18 2 16 −243

Top 16

Team #1 Agg. Team #2 1st leg 2nd leg 3rd leg*
(B1) Maccabi Tel Aviv Israel 2 – 0 Poland Śląsk Wrocław (A8) 81 – 75 85 – 62
(A4) Ülkerspor Turkey 1 – 2 Italy Scavolini Pesaro (B5) 91 – 81 83 – 96 85 – 88
(B3) KK Partizan Serbia and Montenegro 1 – 2 France ASVEL Villeurbanne (A6) 80 – 73 76 – 94 62 – 73
(A2) CSKA Moscow Russia 2 – 0 Belgium Telindus Oostende (B7) 94 – 76 77 – 70
(B2) Efes Pilsen Turkey 2 – 1 Lithuania Rytas Vilnius (A7) 89 – 78 69 – 73 86 – 67
(A3) Osiguranje Split Croatia 2 – 0 France EB Pau-Orthez (B6) 79 – 78 85 – 83
(B4) Iraklis BC Greece 1 – 2 Germany ALBA Berlin (A5) 78 – 67 77 – 88 75 – 86
(A1) PanathinaikosGreece 2 – 0 Slovenia KK Krka (B8) 82 – 65 84 – 79

* if necessary

Quarterfinals

Team #1 Agg. Team #2 1st leg 2nd leg 3rd leg*
(B1) Maccabi Tel Aviv Israel 2 – 0 Italy Scavolini Pesaro (B5) 80 – 69 84 – 77
(A2) CSKA Moscow Russia 2 – 0 France ASVEL Villeurbanne (A6) 78 – 63 82 – 76
(B2) Efes Pilsen Turkey 2 – 1 Croatia Osiguranje Split (A3) 95 – 69 64 – 72 82 – 59
(A1) Panathinaikos Greece 2 – 0 Germany ALBA Berlin (A5) 87 – 77 71 – 69

Final Four

Bracket

Semi-finals Final
May 11, Bercy
 Israel Maccabi Tel Aviv   86  
 Russia CSKA Moscow  80  
 
May 13, Bercy
     Israel Maccabi Tel Aviv  81
   Greece Panathinaikos  67
Third place
May 11, Bercy May 13, Bercy
 Greece Panathinaikos   74  Turkey Efes Pilsen  91
 Turkey Efes Pilsen  66    Russia CSKA Moscow  85

Semifinals

Maccabi Tel Aviv – CSKA Moscow

May 11
18:00
(Report)
Maccabi Tel Aviv Israel 86–80 Russia CSKA Moscow
Scoring by quarter: 21–19, 16–24, 23–9, 26–28
Pts: Huffman 17
Rebs: Parker 9
Asts: Parker 7
Pts: Kirilenko 23
Rebs: Kirilenko 11
Asts: Kirilenko 2
Palais de Bercy, France
Attendance: 13,200

Panathinaikos – Efes Pilsen

May 11
20:30
(Report)
Panathinaikos Greece 74–66 Turkey Efes Pilsen
Scoring by quarter: 23–10, 15–13, 15–25, 21–18
Pts: Bodiroga 22
Rebs: Alvertis 6
Asts: Bodiroga 5
Pts: Onan 15
Rebs: Besok 8
Asts: Onan 3
Palais de Bercy, France
Attendance: 13,200

Third Place Game

Efes Pilsen – CSKA Moscow

May 13
18:00
(Report)
Efes Pilsen Turkey 91–85 Russia CSKA Moscow
Scoring by quarter: 14–17, 29–31, 17–20, 25–23
Pts: Drobnjak 25
Rebs: Besok 9
Asts: Mulaomerović 12
Pts: Morgunov 16
Rebs: Morgunov 12
Asts: Domani 4
Palais de Bercy, France
Attendance: 13,200

Final

Maccabi Tel Aviv – Panathinaikos

May 13
20:30
(Report)
Maccabi Tel Aviv Israel 81–67 Greece Panathinaikos
Scoring by quarter: 15–13, 22–10, 17–25, 27–19
Pts: McDonald 21
Rebs: Huffman 9
Asts: McDonald 9
Pts: Bodiroga 27
Rebs: Fotsis 8
Asts: Koch 3
Palais de Bercy, France
Attendance: 13,200

Awards

Regular Season MVP

Final Four MVP

Two continental champions

In May 2001, Europe had two continental champions, Maccabi Tel Aviv of the FIBA SuproLeague and Kinder Bologna of Euroleague Basketball Company's Euroleague. The leaders of both organizations realized the need to come up with a new single competition. Negotiating from the position of strength, Euroleague Basketball Company dictated proceedings and FIBA essentially had no choice but to agree to their terms. As a result, the Euroleague was fully integrated under Euroleague Basketball Company's umbrella and teams that competed in the FIBA SuproLeague during the 2000–01 season joined it as well. It is today officially admitted that European basketball had two champions that year, Maccabi of the FIBA SuproLeague and Kinder Bologna of the Euroleague Basketball Company's Euroleague.

The current Euroleague is formed

A year later, Euroleague Basketball Company and FIBA decided that Euroleague Basketball's Euroleague competition would be the main basketball tournament on the continent, to be played between the top level teams of Europe. FIBA Europe would also organize a European league for third tier level teams, known as the FIBA Europe League competition, while Euroleague Basketball would also organize its own second tier level league, combining FIBA's long-time Korać Cup and Saporta Cup competitions into one new competition, the Eurocup. In 2005, Euroleague Basketball and FIBA decided to cooperate with each other and have been jointly cooperating since then.

In essence, the authority in European professional basketball was divided over club-country lines. FIBA stayed in charge of national team competitions (like the FIBA EuroBasket, the FIBA World Cup, and the Summer Olympics), while Euroleague Basketball took over the European professional club competitions. From that point on, FIBA's Korać Cup and Saporta Cup competitions lasted only one more season before folding, which was when Euroleague Basketball launched the Eurocup.

See also

External links

  • Linguasport.com SuproLeague 2001
  • Eurobasket.com SuproLeague
  • SuproLeague At The FIBA Europe Site

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