World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Farm to Market Road 157

Article Id: WHEBN0035091768
Reproduction Date:

Title: Farm to Market Road 157  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Green Oaks Boulevard, Euless, Texas, Transportation in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex, Texas State Highway Loop 9, Texas State Highway Spur 303
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Farm to Market Road 157

Farm to Market Road 157 marker

Farm to Market Road 157
Route information
Maintained by TxDOT
Length: 40.1 mi[1] (64.5 km)
Existed: June 4, 1945[2] – present
Major junctions
South end: FM 66 in Maypearl
 

US 67 in Venus

Bus. US 287 in Mansfield
US 287 in Mansfield
I-20 in Arlington

I-30 in Arlington
North end: SH 121 in Euless
Location
Counties: Tarrant, Johnson, Ellis
Highway system
FM 156 FM 158

Farm to Market Road 157 (FM 157) is a Farm to Market Road in the US state of Texas, traveling from an exit on Texas State Highway 121 south, through Euless, Bedford, Fort Worth, and Arlington in Tarrant County, then enters Johnson County, and passes through Mansfield, and Venus, before entering Ellis County, and terminating at an intersection with Farm to Market Road 66 in Maypearl.[3] While located in Euless and Bedford, FM 157 is known as Industrial Boulevard, while in Fort Worth, it is known as Collins Street. In Arlington, the route continues on Collins, Abram, and Cooper Streets. In Mansfield, the road is known as Main Street and Lone Star Road; in Venus as Main Street, 8th Street, and 7th Street; and in Maypearl as Highway 157. The highway passes directly through the center of Euless and Bedford, passing large neighborhoods and businesses. The route passes a large wetland before passing directly through downtown Arlington, passing major attractions such as Cowboys Stadium and Rangers Ballpark. The route passes through the center of the University of Texas at Arlington, and continues through downtown and southern Arlington, before entering Mansfield. The route continues though central Mansfield, and south to Maypearl. The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) designated the route in 1945, and redesignated the portion traveling from SH 121 to US Bus. 287 as Urban Road 157 (UR 157) in 1995.

Route description

FM 157 southbound, in Euless

FM 157 begins at its southern terminus, a three-way intersection with Farm to Market Road 66, in Maypearl, Texas.[4] The highway starts off as a two-lane, paved, asphalt road. After the intersection, the road continues through northern Maypearl, passing several rows of houses and small businesses. Just after exiting the town, the route passes the large Maypearl Cemetery.[5] The route continues through rural farmland, intersecting several small county roads along the way. At an intersection with Farm to Market Road 1446, the road passes a group of houses and farms. For this length of the route, FM 157 is heading almost due northeast. A few miles after the intersection with FM 1446, the highway turns west and continues for about half a mile in that direction. The road then turns northwest again, and passes the large community of Country Acres.[3] The route continues on through miles of open farmland, intersecting with FM 2258 and FM 875, as well as smaller roads. FM 157 then enters Venus. When the road enters Venus, the name changes from Farm Road 157 to 7th Street. Just after entering the town, the route turns west and is renamed 8th street. The highway spends a very short period of time traveling west, before turning northeast again, and becoming Main Street. The highway passes the Venus Post Office, and proceeds through "downtown Venus", passing most of the town's businesses. FM 157 proceeds to pass over three railroad tracks. The route intersects with US Highway 67, and then exits Venus.[6] The highway passes several large farms, before passing through a very large, unnamed, unincorporated community, and continuing towards Mansfield.[3] The highway enters southern Mansfield, and intersects Business U.S. Route 287, and becomes concurrent with the highway.[7][8]

Downtown Venus, with FM 157 in the foreground

History

FM 157 was first designated on June 4, 1945, and traveled from, a junction with US 287 in Mansfield, in Johnson County, northward to Grapevine, in Tarrant County. Seven days later, on June 11, 1945, the highway was extended from US 287 through Venus and southward to the southern border of Ellis County.[2] The route was extended on December 16, 1955, to a junction with FM 66 in Maypearl, adding approximately 8.8 miles (14.2 km) to the overall length. On May 15, 1980, the northern 0.6 miles (0.97 km) of the route was returned to the city of Grapevine, which was eventually redesignated as Spur 103. The next 3.9 miles (6.3 km) south of that was redesignated as part of State Highway 121 (SH 121) in the same order. Spur 103 was cancelled in 2006. [2] On June 27, 1995, the stretch of the highway traveling from SH 121 south to US 287 was redesignated as UR 157, approximately 17.3 miles (27.8 km).[1] The remaining 22.7 miles (36.5 km) of the route stayed FM 157.[2] On June 26, 2003, a portion of the route was redesignated from Collins Street to Cooper Street, in Arlington.[1][3]

Future

In 2012, TxDOT began discussions for a project for the rerouting of FM 157 from FM 1807 south of Venus north to US 287 in Mansfield. The project would potentially reroute the highway to a more direct path, and take it through several large neighborhoods.[9] As of March 2012, no official work has begun.[10][11]

Major junctions

County Location Mile[3] km Destinations Notes
Ellis Maypearl 0.0 0.0 FM 66 Southern terminus
  1.0 1.6 FM 1446 Western terminus of FM 1446
  5.7 9.2 FM 2258
  7.7 12.4 FM 875 Western terminus of FM 875
  8.6 13.8 FM 1807 Eastern terminus of FM 1807
Venus 10.7 17.2 US 67
Mansfield 19.5 31.4
Bus. US 287
South end of US 287 Bus.concurrency
Tarrant 21.1 34.0 FM 917 Eastern terminus of FM 917
22.7 36.5
Bus. US 287
North end of US 287 Bus. concurrency
24.0 38.6 US 287
Arlington 27.5 44.3 I-20 Cloverleaf interchange exit
31.1 50.1 Spur 303
32.2–
33.0
51.8–
53.1
UT-Arlington Major access to most of campus
34.2 55.0 SH 180
35.6 57.3 I-30 No westbound entrance
Euless 38.4 61.8 SH 10
39.0 62.8 SH 183 FM 157 southbound lanes enter Bedford
40.1 64.5 SH 121 Northern terminus, no northbound exit
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Transportation Planning and Programming Division. "Urban Road No. 157". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 15, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d Transportation Planning and Programming Division. "Farm to Market Road No. 157". Highway Designation Files.  
  3. ^ a b c d e Google Inc. "Overview Map of Farm to Market Road 157". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=Farm+to+Market+157+N&daddr=Farm+to+Market+157+N+to:Farm+to+Market+157+N+to:Farm+to+Market+157+N+to:Farm+to+Market+157+N+to:Farm+to+Market+157+N+to:County+Rd+521/Lone+Star+Rd+to:S+Main+St+to:S+Main+St+to:US-287+BUS+N+to:Farm+to+Market+157+N+to:S+Cooper+St+to:S+Cooper+St+to:S+Cooper+St+to:S+Cooper+St+to:Unknown+road+to:E+Division+St+to:N+Collins+St+to:S+Industrial+Blvd+to:S+Industrial+Blvd+to:32.867251,-97.099734&hl=en&geocode=FYEP7QEdGrc3-g%3BFUY57QEdFpA3-g%3BFc4F7gEdEuo2-g%3BFURn7gEduKg2-g%3BFaiU7gEdKJM2-g%3BFSrv7gEdUE02-g%3BFbx08AEdmEY2-g%3BFQ6q8AEdOO01-g%3BFdzg8AEdBrs1-g%3BFTAe8QEdlp41-g%3BFblk8QEdGKY1-g%3BFZ2V8gEdeNc1-g%3BFe4W8wEduyA2-g%3BFbBV8wEdDiY2-g%3BFdOB8wEdmyY2-g%3BFRaP8wEddyg2-g%3BFZeO8wEdT2k2-g%3BFbTe8wEdumo2-g%3BFeDs9AEdfmA2-g%3BFY0P9QEd_l82-g%3B&abauth=c4d125fd:--OJlk1BwMHw4D4V9tir2R9_Ntw&vps=21&ei=79lnT9vnLeikwQGZrKybCA&jsv=402c&sll=32.867774,-97.099593&sspn=0.005326,0.006899&vpsrc=6&mra=mi&mrsp=20&sz=17&num=10. Retrieved March 18, 2012.
  4. ^ American Map (2004). Discovery Channel Road Atlas (Map). 1 in:143.5 mi. Cartography by Mapquest.com, Inc. p. 106. ISBN .
  5. ^ Texas Department of Transportation (2012) (PDF). Texas County Map Book (Map). 1:120,000. Cartography by Transportation Planning and Programming Division (2012 ed.). p. 484. http://www.dot.state.tx.us/apps-cg/grid_search/_includes/countymapbook2006/Pages/484.pdf. Retrieved April 19, 2012.
  6. ^ Texas Department of Transportation (2012) (PDF). Texas County Map Book (Map). 1:120,000. Cartography by Transportation Planning and Programming Division (2012 ed.). p. 483. http://www.dot.state.tx.us/apps-cg/grid_search/_includes/countymapbook2006/Pages/483.pdf. Retrieved April 19, 2012.
  7. ^ American Map (2004). Discovery Channel Road Atlas (Map). 1 in:143.5 mi. Cartography by Mapquest.com, Inc. p. 108. ISBN .
  8. ^ Texas Department of Transportation (2012) (PDF). Texas County Map Book (Map). 1:120,000. Cartography by Transportation Planning and Programming Division (2012 ed.). p. 453. http://www.dot.state.tx.us/apps-cg/grid_search/_includes/countymapbook2006/Pages/453.pdf. Retrieved April 19, 2012.
  9. ^ Texas Department of Transportation (PDF). Project Map: FM 157 Realignment (Map). http://ftp.dot.state.tx.us/pub/txdot-info/ftw/fort_worth_fm157_map.pdf. Retrieved March 20, 2012.
  10. ^ Staff. "FM 157 Project". Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 19, 2012. 
  11. ^ Staff. "FM 157 major study (realignment)". Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 20, 2012. 
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.