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Festival of the dead

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Festival of the dead

Festival of the Dead or Feast of Ancestors[1] is held by many cultures throughout the world in honor or recognition of deceased members of the community, generally occurring after the harvest in August, September, October, or November. As an example, the Ancient Egyptian Wag Festival took place in early August.[2]

In Japanese Buddhist custom the festival honoring the departed (deceased) spirits of one's ancestors is known as the Bon Festival and is held in July or August.[3]

For the Hindus the ritual done for the dead ancestors is called Pitru Paksha. It is based on the Hindu lunar calendar and the period lasts for 15 days, falling towards the end of September.

The Roman Catholic church celebrates three days of Allhallowtide from 31 October to 1 November, marking All Saints' Eve All Saints' Day and the second of November as All Souls' Day. The Mexican holiday celebrated at Hallowtide is called Dia de Los Muertos or Day of the Dead - prior to the Spanish colonisation and the conversion of local people to Christianity, this festival was celebrated in the summer time.[4]

In many cultures a single event, Festival of the Dead, lasting up to 3 days, was held at the end of October and beginning of November; examples include the Peruvians, the Pacific Islanders, the people of the Tonga Islands, the ancient Persians, ancient Romans, and the northern nations of Europe. [1]

In the Inca religion the entire month of November is 'Ayamarca', which translates to Festival of the Dead. The Chinese and Buddhist festival is called Ghost Festival.

In the 21st century, European traditions mark the celebrations of Halloween.

See also

External links

References

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