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Forest management

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Title: Forest management  
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Subject: World Forestry Congress, Forestry, Ecological thinning, Forest, Wood
Collection: Ecological Processes, Forest Management, Habitat Management Equipment and Methods
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Forest management

Sustainable forest management carried out by Complejo Panguipulli has contributed to the preservation of the forested landscape around Neltume, a sawmill town in Chile

Forest management is a branch of forestry concerned with the overall administrative, economic, legal and social aspects and with the essentially scientific and technical aspects, especially silviculture, protection, and forest regulation. This includes management for aesthetics, fish, recreation, urban values, water, wilderness, wildlife, wood products, forest genetic resources and other forest resource values.[1] Management can be based on conservation, economics, or a mixture of the two. Techniques include timber extraction, planting and replanting of various species, cutting roads and pathways through forests, and preventing fire.

Contents

  • Public input and awareness 1
  • Wildlife considerations 2
  • Management intensity 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5

Public input and awareness

There has been an increased public awareness of natural resource policy, including forest management. Public concern regarding forest management may have shifted from the extraction of timber for earning money for the economy, to the preservation of additional forest resources, including wildlife and old growth forest, protecting biodiversity, watershed management, and recreation. Increased environmental awareness may contribute to an increased public mistrust of forest management professionals.[2] But it can also lead to greater understanding about what professionals do re forests for nature conservation and ecological services. The importance of taking care of the forests for ecological as well as economical sustainable reasons has been shown in the TV show Ax Men.

Many tools like GIS modelling have been developed to improve forest inventory and management planning.[3]

Wildlife considerations

The abundance and diversity of birds, mammals, amphibians and other wildlife are affected by strategies and types of forest management.[4]

Management intensity

Forest management varies in intensity from a leave alone, natural situation to a highly intensive regime with silvicultural interventions. Management is generally increased in intensity to achieve either economic criteria (increased timber yields, non-timber forest products, ecosystem services) or ecological criteria (species recovery, fostering of rare species, carbon sequestration).[5]

See also


References

Deforestation and increased road-building in the Amazon Rainforest are a significant concern because of increased human encroachment upon wild areas, increased resource extraction and further threats to biodiversity.
  1. ^ "Glossary of Forestry Terms in British Columbia" (pdf). Ministry of Forests and Range (Canada). March 2008. Retrieved 2009-04-06. 
  2. ^ Shindler, Bruce; Lori A. Cramer (January 1999). "Shifting Public Values for Forest Management: Making Sense of Wicked Problems". Western Journal of Applied Forestry (Society of American Foresters) 14 (1): 28–34.  
  3. ^ (2)1 S.A.P.I.EN.S.Mozgeris, G. (2008) “The continuous field view of representing forest geographically: from cartographic representation towards improved management planning”.
  4. ^ * Philip Joseph Burton. 2003. Towards sustainable management of the boreal forest 1039 pages
  5. ^ Classification of Forest Management Approaches: A New Conceptual Framework and Its Applicability to European Forestry Philipp S. Duncker 1, Susana M. Barreiro 2, Geerten M. Hengeveld 3, Torgny Lind 4, William L. Mason 5, Slawomir Ambrozy 6 and Heinrich Spiecker 1|http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol17/iss4/art51/
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