World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Freedom of religion in North Korea

Article Id: WHEBN0016144644
Reproduction Date:

Title: Freedom of religion in North Korea  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Freedom of religion in Azerbaijan, Freedom of religion in Syria, Freedom of religion, Freedom of religion in Saudi Arabia, Religion in North Korea
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Freedom of religion in North Korea

In North Korea, the Constitution provides for "freedom of religious belief"; the Democratic People's Republic of Korea is an secular state. The US and South Korean governments are the main sources of information of religion in North Korea and the two countries are technically still at war, therefore independent media argues that this is just anti-North Korean propaganda.[1]

North Korea is officially an People's Republic of China, and specifically, those repatriated from China and found to have been in contact with foreigners or missionaries, have been arrested and subjected to harsh penalties. Refugees and defectors continued to allege that they witnessed the arrests and execution of members of underground Christian churches by the regime in prior years. Due to the country's inaccessibility and the inability to gain timely information, the continuation of this activity remains difficult to verify.

Religion in North Korea

Traditionally, religion in [5]

Status of religious freedom

The Government deals harshly with all opponents, including those who engage in religious practices deemed unacceptable by the regime. An estimated 150,000 to 200,000 persons were believed to be held in political prison camps (Kwalliso) in remote areas,[6] many for religious and political reasons.[7]

In March 2006 the Government reportedly sentenced Son Jong-nam to death for espionage. However, NGOs claimed that the sentence against Son was based on his contacts with Christian groups in China, his proselytizing activities, and alleged sharing of information with his brother in South Korea. Son's brother reported that information indicated that Son was alive as of spring 2007. Because the country effectively bars outside observers from investigating such reports, it was not possible to verify the Government's claims about Son Jong-nam's activities or determine whether he had been executed. A fellow inmate of the Pyongyang prison where Son was held states that he died there in December 2008.[8]

A South Korean newspaper reported 80 people were publicly executed in North Korea in November of 2013, some for possessing a Bible, while a crowd was herded into a stadium in one city and forced to watch the deaths from machine gun fire. [9] The JoongAng Ilbo reported the executions were carried out in seven cities on Nov. 3, 2013.[10] Christians have faced intense persecution in North Korea, which is ranked as the worst country in the world in terms of Christian persecution by watchdog group Open Doors.[11]

See also

References

  1. ^ http://screechingkettle.blogspot.com.br/2014/12/americans-laugh-at-north-korean.html
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^ CIA - The World Factbook - Korea, North
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^ http://www.thenewamerican.com/world-news/asia/item/16955-north-korea-executes-citizens-for-having-bibles-watching-tv
  10. ^ http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/11/12/reports-north-korea-executed-80-people-for-watching-tv-and-owning-bibles/
  11. ^ http://www.christianpost.com/news/north-korea-publicly-executes-80-prisoners-crimes-include-possessing-bibles-108651/
  • United States Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor. North Korea: International Religious Freedom Report 2007. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.