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Gibson J-160E

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Gibson J-160E

Gibson J-160E
Lennon's 1962 Gibson J-160E
Manufacturer Gibson
Period 1954 - present
Construction
Body type Round-shoulder dreadnought
Neck joint Dovetail
Woods
Body Sitka Spruce top
Mahogany back and sides
Neck Mahogany
Fretboard Rosewood
Hardware
Bridge Rosewood
Pickup(s) uncovered P-90
Colors available
Natural, Heritage Cherry Sunburst, Vintage Sunburst

The Gibson J-160E is one of the first acoustic-electric guitars produced by the Gibson Guitar Corporation.

The J-160E was Gibson's second attempt at creating an acoustic-electric guitar (the first being the small-body CF-100E). The basic concept behind the guitar was to fit a single-pickup (and associated electronics) into a normal-size dreadnought acoustic guitar. The J-160E used plywood for most of the guitar's body, and was ladder-braced, whereas other acoustic Gibsons were X-braced. The rosewood fingerboard had trapezoid inlays, and the guitar had an adjustable bridge. For amplification, a single-coil pickup (an uncovered P-90 pickup)[1] was installed under the top of the body with the pole screws protruding through the top at the end of the fingerboard, with a volume and a tone knob.

The Beatles, both on-stage and in the studio. Gibson produces a standard J-160E and a John Lennon J-160E Peace model, based on the J-160E he used during the Bed-In days of 1969. Epiphone makes an EJ-160E John Lennon replica signature model.

Notable J-160E users

Barry Gibb of the Bee Gees plays a J-160E, and can be seen in several live performances of the band from 1967 to 1968.

Sam Lightnin' Hopkins played a J-160E which is on display at the Rock Hall of Fame.

Richard Barone plays a J-160E as his primary acoustic guitar on solo and band performances and with The Bongos.

Pete Doherty of the Libertines/babyshambles plays a J-160E during most of his solo appearances.

Chad Stuart and Jeremy Clyde of Chad and Jeremy played J-160E guitars from 1964 to 1968.

Peter Asher and Gordon Waller of Peter and Gordon played J-160E guitars, and can be seen in live acts in US during the 2000s.

Steve Marriott of Small Faces used a J-160E as the main acoustic guitar for the 1967 album Small Faces.

Mike Viola of Mike Viola and The Candy Butchers uses a J-160e with a Fishman blend Pickup.

Elvis Costello uses a J-160e.

George Harrison's Official Facebook Page posted this note on June 4, 2015: "George used his J-160E live, on television, and it’s the only instrument used on every Beatles album from ‘Please Please Me’ to ‘Abbey Road.’"

References

  1. ^
    "The 70th Anniversary John Lennon J-160E is built in the exacting image of the groundbreaking original J-160E of the 1950s and '60s. ... Gibson applied a great deal of forward-looking, out-of-the-box thinking to the design of the J-160E in 1954. ... To build one of the world's first truly successful electro-acoustic guitars, Gibson re-drew the blueprint: it crafted a three-layer laminated Sitka spruce top with ladder bracing specifically to resist feedback, used a mahogany back and sides for added warmth and richness, added an adjustable bridge, and installed a P-90 pickup (without traditional cover) beneath the top at the end of the fingerboard, along with a single volume and tone control and a 1/4" output jack. In addition, the guitar's solid mahogany neck was attached at the 15th fret to give performers plenty of access to the highest of the instrument's jumbo frets."


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