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Hazel grouse

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Title: Hazel grouse  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Grouse, Chinese grouse, List of endangered and protected species of China, Hazel (disambiguation), Stolby Nature Sanctuary
Collection: Animals Described in 1758, Birds of Europe, Grouse, Tetraoninae
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Hazel grouse

Hazel grouse
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Galliformes
Family: Phasianidae
Subfamily: Tetraoninae
Genus: Tetrastes
Species: T. bonasia
Binomial name
Tetrastes bonasia
(Linnaeus, 1758)
Range of T. bonasia
Synonyms[2]

Bonasa bonasia (Linnaeus, 1758)

The hazel grouse, (Tetrastes bonasia) sometimes called the hazel hen, is one of the smaller members of the grouse family of birds. It is a sedentary species, breeding across northern Eurasia as far east as Hokkaido, and as far west as central and eastern Europe, in dense, damp, mixed coniferous woodland, preferably with some spruce.

Hazel grouse
Eggs, Collection Museum Wiesbaden
Hazel Grouse chick

Contents

  • Description 1
  • Feeding 2
  • Breeding 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Description

This is a relatively small grouse at 35–39 cm (14–15 in) length. The plumage of this plump bird is finely patterned, but it essentially has grey upperparts, brown wings and chestnut flecked white underparts.

The male has a short erectile crest and a white-bordered black throat. The female has a shorter crest and lacks the black color on the throat. In flight, this species shows a black-tipped grey tail.

The male has a high-pitched ti-ti-ti-ti-ti call, and the female a liquid tettettettettet. These calls, along with the burr of the flying birds' wings, are often the only indication of this grouse's presence, since its shyness and dense woodland habitat make it difficult to see.

Feeding

This bird feeds on the ground, taking mainly plant food, supplemented by insects when breeding.

Breeding

The nest is on the ground, and 3–6 eggs is the normal clutch size. The female incubates the eggs and cares for the chicks alone, as is typical with gamebirds.

References

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2012). "Bonasa bonasia".  
  2. ^ Peterson, Alan P. "Birds of the World — current valid scientific avian names". Retrieved 27 January 2010. 

External links

  • Bonasa bonasiaBirdLife species factsheet for
  • Tetrastes bonasia on Avibase
  • Hazel grouse videos, photos, and sounds at the Internet Bird Collection
  • Hazel grouse photo gallery at VIREO (Drexel University)
  • Bonasa bonasiaInteractive range map of at IUCN Red List maps
  • Audio recordings of Hazel grouse on Xeno-canto.
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