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Horace Grant

Horace Grant
Personal information
Born (1965-07-04) July 4, 1965
Augusta, Georgia
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m)
Listed weight 245 lb (111 kg)
Career information
High school Hancock Central (Sparta, Georgia)
College Clemson (1983–1987)
NBA draft 1987 / Round: 1 / Pick: 10th overall
Selected by the Chicago Bulls
Pro career 1987–2004
Position Power forward / Center
Number 54
Career history
19871994 Chicago Bulls
19941999 Orlando Magic
1999–2000 Seattle SuperSonics
2000–2001 Los Angeles Lakers
20012002 Orlando Magic
2003–2004 Los Angeles Lakers
Career highlights and awards
Career statistics
Points 12,996 (11.2 ppg)
Rebound 9,443 (8.1 rpg)
Assists 2,575 (2.2 apg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Horace Junior Grant (born July 4, 1965) is an American retired basketball player. He attended and played college basketball at Clemson University, before playing professionally in the National Basketball Association (NBA), where he became a four-time champion with the Chicago Bulls and Los Angeles Lakers. He was easily recognizable to NBA fans with his trademark goggles.

Contents

  • Career 1
  • Family 2
  • NBA career statistics 3
    • Regular season 3.1
    • Playoffs 3.2
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Career

Grant was born in 1987 NBA draft. The 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m) tall power forward/Center (basketball) immediately teamed with fellow draft-day acquisition Scottie Pippen to form the Bulls' forward tandem of the future, although he initially backed up incumbent Charles Oakley, one of the league's premier rebounders and post defenders.

In 1989, Grant moved into the starting lineup when Oakley was traded to the New York Knicks for center Bill Cartwright. He immediately became the Bulls' main rebounder, and established himself as the Bulls' third scoring option after Michael Jordan and Pippen, forming one of the league's best trios. Grant was noted for his defensive play; he was selected four times for the NBA All-Defensive Team.[1] He helped Chicago win three consecutive NBA championships (1991, 1992, and 1993), securing the third with a last-second block.

After Jordan's first retirement following the 1992–93 season, Grant became the number-two star behind Pippen, and helped the Bulls push the Knicks to seven games in the second-round playoff series before being eliminated. Grant played in the 1994 NBA All-Star Game, posting four points and eight rebounds in 17 minutes. After posting career-bests in scoring (15.1 ppg), rebounding (11.0 rpg) and assists (3.4 apg), he left the Bulls as a free agent and joined the Orlando Magic, led by Shaquille O'Neal and Penny Hardaway. On May 5, 1995, Grant made the final basket in Boston Garden history in Orlando's series clinching victory over the Boston Celtics. Grant helped the Magic reach the 1995 NBA Finals, where they were swept in four games by the more experienced Houston Rockets. Grant spent the next several seasons with the Magic, until he was traded to the Seattle SuperSonics along with 2000 and 2001 2nd round picks for Dale Ellis, Don MacLean, Billy Owens and rookie Corey Maggette just before start of the 1999–2000 season.

After one year with the Sonics, he was involved in a three-way trade in which Glen Rice of the Los Angeles Lakers was sent to New York, Patrick Ewing of the Knicks was sent to Seattle, and Grant to the defending champion Lakers. He helped them win another championship in 2000–01, but in the offseason decided to leave Los Angeles and sign back with the Magic. Grant was cut by the Magic in December 2002 after then-coach Doc Rivers implied Grant was a "cancer" on the team.[2]

Grant chose to retire after getting cut by the Magic. However, he decided to return for another run with the Lakers for the 2003–04 season as a backup to Karl Malone. He then retired permanently following the Lakers' loss to the Detroit Pistons in the 2004 Finals.

Family

Grant has three daughters (Naomi, Maia, and Eva) and one son (Elijah) with his wife Andrea. He has 1 other daughter from a previous relationship (Gianna, who attends UCLA) He has two sons (Horace Jr. and Deon) from a previous relationship. His identical twin brother, Harvey Grant, also played in the NBA.

Three of Grant's nephews are also basketball players. Jerai Grant played college basketball for Clemson University[3] and currently plays overseas;[4] Jerian Grant played for the University of Notre Dame Fighting Irish men's basketball team and currently plays for the New York Knicks; and Jerami Grant played for the Syracuse University Orange men's basketball team and currently plays for the Philadelphia 76ers.

NBA career statistics

Denotes seasons in which Grant won an NBA championship

Regular season

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1987–88 Chicago 81 6 22.6 .501 .000 .626 5.5 1.1 .6 .7 7.7
1988–89 Chicago 79 79 35.6 .519 .000 .704 8.6 2.1 1.1 .8 12.0
1989–90 Chicago 80 80 34.4 .523 .699 7.9 2.8 1.2 1.1 13.4
1990–91 Chicago 78 76 33.9 .547 .167 .711 8.4 2.3 1.2 .9 12.8
1991–92 Chicago 81 81 35.3 .578 .000 .741 10.0 2.7 1.2 1.6 14.2
1992–93 Chicago 77 77 35.6 .508 .200 .619 9.5 2.6 1.2 1.2 13.2
1993–94 Chicago 70 69 36.7 .524 .000 .596 11.0 3.4 1.1 1.2 15.1
1994–95 Orlando 74 74 36.4 .567 .000 .692 9.7 2.3 1.0 1.2 12.8
1995–96 Orlando 63 62 36.3 .513 .167 .734 9.2 2.7 1.0 1.2 13.4
1996–97 Orlando 67 67 37.3 .515 .167 .715 9.0 2.4 1.5 1.0 12.6
1997–98 Orlando 76 76 36.9 .459 .000 .678 8.1 2.3 1.1 1.0 12.1
1998–99 Orlando 50 50 33.2 .434 .000 .671 7.0 1.8 .9 1.2 8.9
1999–00 Seattle 76 76 35.4 .444 .000 .721 7.8 2.5 .7 .8 8.1
2000–01 L.A. Lakers 77 77 31.0 .462 .000 .775 7.1 1.6 .7 .8 8.5
2001–02 Orlando 76 76 29.1 .513 .721 6.3 1.4 .8 .6 8.0
2002–03 Orlando 5 1 17.0 .520 1.6 1.4 .6 .0 5.2
2003–04 L. A. Lakers 55 10 20.1 .411 .000 .722 4.2 1.3 .4 .4 4.1
Career 1165 1037 33.2 .509 .063 .692 8.1 2.2 1.0 1.0 11.2
All-Star 1 0 17.0 .250 8.0 2.0 1.0 2.0 4.0

Playoffs

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1988 Chicago 10 0 29.9 .568 .000 .600 7.0 1.6 1.4 .2 10.1
1989 Chicago 17 17 36.8 .518 .800 9.8 2.1 .6 .9 10.8
1990 Chicago 16 16 38.5 .509 .000 .623 9.9 2.5 1.1 1.1 12.2
1991 Chicago 17 17 39.2 .583 .733 8.1 2.2 .9 .4 13.3
1992 Chicago 22 22 38.9 .541 .000 .671 8.8 3.0 1.1 1.8 11.3
1993 Chicago 19 19 34.3 .546 .685 8.2 2.3 1.2 1.2 10.7
1994 Chicago 10 10 39.3 .542 1.000 .738 7.4 2.6 1.0 1.8 16.2
1995 Orlando 21 21 41.4 .540 .000 .763 10.4 1.9 1.0 1.1 13.7
1996 Orlando 9 9 37.1 .649 .867 10.4 1.4 .8 .7 15.0
1999 Orlando 4 4 32.0 .367 .625 7.0 1.3 .5 .5 6.8
2000 Seattle 5 5 37.0 .407 .500 6.2 2.0 1.6 1.0 4.8
2001 L.A. Lakers 16 16 26.4 .385 .733 6.0 1.2 .9 .8 6.0
2002 Orlando 4 4 31.8 .364 1.000 7.8 2.3 .8 .3 4.5
Career 170 160 36.3 .530 .125 .714 8.6 2.1 1.0 1.0 11.2

See also

References

  1. ^ NBA Postseason Awards: All-Defensive Teams, nba.com. accessed 24 April 2007.
  2. ^ "Rivers says 'cancer' had to be cut from team", espn.go.com, 11 December 2002, accessed 8 March 2009.
  3. ^ "Senior forward Jerai Grant emerging as pleasant inside surprise", www.orangeandwhite.com, January 11, 2011.
  4. ^ National Basketball League | Sydney Kings: Sydney Kings' Jerai Grant arrives in town

External links

  • Career statistics and player information from NBA.com
  • Horace Grant at Basketball-Reference.com
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