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Hossein Hamadani

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Hossein Hamadani

Hossein Hamadani
Born Iran
Allegiance  Iran
Service/branch Revolutionary Guards
Years of service 1970-present[1]
Rank Brigadier General
Unit Rassoulollah Corps
Battles/wars 1979 Kurdish rebellion in Iran
Iran-Iraq War
2009–2010 Iranian election protests
Syrian Civil War

Hossein Hamadani, also spelled Hamedani (Persian: حسین همدانی‎), is an Iranian Revolutionary Guard commander who led the crackdown on protestors during the 2009-2010 Iranian election protests, who is currently serving in Syria as both an advisor to the Syrian government during the Syrian Civil War and as overseer for Quds Force operations in support of the Syrian government.[2]

Hamadani first rose to prominence during the 1979 Kurdish rebellion in Iran and the Iran-Iraq War, where he helped suppress the Kurdish rebellion in Iranian Kurdistan. Mohammad Ali Jafari appointed him as Deputy Commander of the IRGC in 2005, and together they planned how to deal with any attempted "velvet revolution" in Iran. Hamadani subsequently suppressed the 2009-2010 election protests in Iran.[3] He has been head of the IRGC’s Rassoulollah Corps in charge of Greater Tehran since November 2009,[4] and has been subject to international sanctions since 14 April 2011.[5][6]

Hamadani has also released a biography entitled Brother, It's Duty.[3]

References

  1. ^ "موقع إيران بريفينغ". Arabic.iranbriefing.net. Retrieved 2012-09-24. 
  2. ^ "Top Iranian Official Acknowledges Syria Role". Wall Street Journal. 16 September 2012. Retrieved 23 September 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "What Is Iran Doing in Syria?". Foreign Policy. Retrieved 2012-09-23. 
  4. ^ "Hossein Hamedani". Ukforiranians.fco.gov.uk. 2012-03-26. Retrieved 2012-09-24. 
  5. ^ "Consolidated List of Financial Sanctions Targets in the UK". Hm-treasury.gov.uk. Retrieved 2012-09-24. 
  6. ^ http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2010-165/section-sched1-20111121.html
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