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Hyporheic zone

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Title: Hyporheic zone  
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Subject: Freshwater environmental quality parameters, Perennial stream, Stream bed, Water cycle, Water streams
Collection: Hydrology, Water Streams
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Hyporheic zone

The hyporheic zone is a region beneath and alongside a stream bed, where there is mixing of shallow groundwater and surface water. The flow dynamics and behavior in this zone (termed hyporheic flow or underflow) is recognized to be important for surface water/groundwater interactions, as well as fish spawning, among other processes. As an innovative urban water management practice, the hyporheic zone can be designed by engineers and actively managed for improvements in both water quality and riparian habitat.[1]

The assemblage of organisms which inhabits this zone are called hyporheos.

The term hyporheic was originally coined by Traian Orghidan[2] in 1959 by combining two Greek words: hypo (below) and rheos (flow).

References

  1. ^ Lawrence, J.E.; M. Skold; F.A. Hussain; D. Silverman; V.H. Resh; D.L. Sedlak; R.G. Luthy; J.E. McCray (14 August 2013). "Hyporheic Zone in Urban Streams: A Review and Opportunities for Enhancing Water Quality and Improving Aquatic Habitat by Active Management". Environmental Engineering Science 47: 480–501.  
  2. ^ Orghidan, T. (1959). "Ein neuer Lebensraum des unterirdischen Wassers: Der hyporheische Biotop". Archiv für Hydrobilogie 55: 392–414. 

External links

  • An article on the hyporheic zone of streams, and water purification. Includes a diagram.
  • The Hyporheic Network is a knowledge-transfer network on groundwater - surface water interactions and hyporheic zone processes. It provides a wealth of information and links to other resources on this topic.


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