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Jameel McClain

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Jameel McClain

Jameel McClain
M&T Bank Stadium in August 2011.
No. 53     Baltimore Ravens
Linebacker
Personal information
Date of birth: (1985-07-25) July 25, 1985 (age 29)
Place of birth: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Height: 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)Weight: 250 lb (113 kg)
Career information
College: Syracuse
Undrafted in 2008
Debuted in 2008 for the Baltimore Ravens
Career history

Roster status: Active
Career highlights and awards

Career NFL statistics as of 2012

Jameel Leshawn McClain (born July 25, 1985 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American football linebacker who is a member of the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League. He was signed by the Ravens as an undrafted free agent in 2008. He played college football at Syracuse.

Early Years

Jameel's prep career took place at George Washington High School in Philadelphia, PA where he recorded 230 tackles, 22 sacks,8 FFs and 13 FRs in his career. He was also a captain his senior season.

Jameel was also a boxer during his grade school years. He trained at a gym in the city and competed in Gold Glove competitions in and around the area. He had a 6-1 career record with his only loss coming by decision.

College career

McClain played college football at Syracuse University.

Totaled 170 tackles (82 solo), 21.5 TFL, 11.5 sacks, 3 FRs, 1 FF and 1 INT in his 4-year career at SU

Was one of nine players to start all 12 games as a senior and posted a career-high 77 tackles (39 solo), 1 sack, 1 FR and a blocked FGA

Named second-team All-Big East as a junior, finishing second in the conference and 18th nationally with a career-high 9.5 sacks

Was a semifinalist for the Ted Hendricks Award, given to the nation’s best defensive lineman

Started every game as a junior, posting 69 tackles, including 39 solo, 14.5 TFL, 1 FF and 1 FR

His 14.5 TFL ranked sixth on the SU single-season list

Saw action in 10 games, primarily on special teams as a sophomore, netting 20 tackles and a sack

Played in 11 games as a freshman and had 11 tackles and a FR

McClain wore number 52 as a member of the Orange.

Professional career

McClain signed with the Baltimore Ravens as an undrafted free agent in 2008. He was the only rookie free agent to make the Ravens roster in 2008. In his debut season he played spot duty and some special teams work. He recorded 16 total tackles, a blocked punt, and two safeties & 2.5 sacks in the regular season. In the postseason, he accumulated 4 total tackles. He established a franchise record with 2 safeties in one season (sack of then Oakland Raiders QB Jamarcus Russell and a blocked punt).

McClain started his first career game in 2009 vs. the Indianapolis Colts on November 22. He finished the season with a then career high 29 tackles from scrimmage and 33 tackles and a forced fumble on special teams.

He started 15 of 16 games in 2010 finishing 3rd on the team (behind Ray Lewis and Dawan Landry) with a career high 91 tackles, 2 PD, 1 FR and 1 Sack.

In 2010, McClain made a questionable hit on Pittsburgh Steelers tight end Heath Miller during their Sunday Night Football game on December 5, 2010. Diving for a pass, Miller was hit helmet to helmet by Jameel, knocking him out on the field. No flag was thrown or penalty called. On December 6, 2010, Jameel McClain was fined $40,000 for the hit on Miller,[1] a fine that was later reduced to $20,000.[2]

Personal life

Off the field McClain has participated in many different philanthropic events. Since 2008 he has built a relationship with the Salvation Army Baltimore Area Command, becoming their spokesperson and speaking at their November 2008 kickoff event for the annual Red Kettle Campaign. In 2009 he and a bunch of fellow Ravens teammates participated in the Salvation Army's Holiday Gift Distribution by distributing gift packages to local families in need. He has also worked with the United Way on a number of their "Extreme Makeover" projects, helping to renovate the Woodmoor Police Athletic League Center and the Medfield Recreation Center.

Aside from his philanthropic participation with the Salvation Army he also has a personal connection to the organization. During his childhood there were periods of homelessness in which he, his mother and three siblings lived at a Salvation Army rescue center in Philadelphia, PA. "You'd just have nights where food was a figment of your stomach's imagination, where you would go to bed hungry," McClain recalls "Having the same jeans weeks at a time, sharing a room at the shelter with strangers and having to be there at a certain time, worrying that people were going to come in your room after you were asleep and mess with you...there were some tough times."[3]

McClain used his experience at the Salvation Army to help build the foundation for his future, he earned a scholarship from Syracuse University to play football and then jumped at the opportunity to show the Ravens that he deserved to be a member of their team by being the only undrafted rookie free agent to make their 53 man roster in 2008. "My life has been one boxing match after another," McClain says. "No matter what gets thrown at me, I keep fighting."[4]

References

External links

  • Baltimore Ravens bio
  • Syracuse Orange bio
  • [1]

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