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Line breaking rules in East Asian languages

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Line breaking rules in East Asian languages

The line breaking rules in East Asian language specify how to wrap East Asian Language text such as Chinese, Japanese, Korean. Certain characters in those languages should not come at the end of a line, certain characters should not come at the start of a line, and some characters should never be split up across two lines. For example, periods and closing parentheses are not allowed to start a line. Many word processing and DTP software products have built-in features to control line breaking rules in those languages.

In Japanese Language, especially, categories of line breaking rules and processing methods are determined by Japanese Industrial Standard JIS X 4051,[1] and it is called Kinsoku Shori (禁則処理).

Line breaking rules in Chinese text

Line breaking rules for Chinese language have been described in the reference of Office Open XML, Ecma standard.[2] There are rules about certain characters that are not allowed to start or end a line, such as below.

Simplified Chinese

  • Characters that are not allowed at the start of a line :

!%),.:;>?]}¢¨°·ˇˉ―‖’”„‟†‡›℃∶、。〃〆〈《「『〕〗〞︵︹︽︿﹃﹘﹚﹜!"%'),.:;?]`|}~

  • Characters that are not allowed at the end of a line :

$(*,£¥·‘“〈《「『【〔〖〝﹗﹙﹛$(.[{£¥

Traditional Chinese

  • Characters that are not allowed at the start of a line :

!),.:;?]}¢·–— ’”•‥„‧ †╴ 、。〆〈《「『〕〞︰︱︲︳︵︷︹︻︽︿﹁﹃﹏﹐﹑﹒﹓﹔﹕﹖﹘﹚﹜!),.:;?]|}、

  • Characters that are not allowed at the end of a line :

(¢°’”†‡℃〆〈《「『〕!%),.:;?]}

  • Characters that are not allowed at the end of a line :

$([\{£¥‘“々〇〉》」〔$([{⦆¥₩ #

Korean standards related to line breaking rules

  • KS X ISO/IEC 26300:2007, OpenDocument standard in Korea, describes hyphenation at the start or at the end of line in OpenDocument.[3]
  • KS X 6001, standard for file specification of Korean word processor intermediate document, describes rules for line breaking at the end of page.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b ―. JIS X 4051:2004 Formatting Ruls for Japanese Documents (『日本語文書の組版方法』). Japanese Standards Associtaion. 2004.
  2. ^ a b "MS Office Office OpenXML Part 4 - Markup Language Reference" (PDF(ZIP)). Ecma International. pp. 85–87. Retrieved 2010-10-28. 
  3. ^ ―. KS X ISO/IEC 26300:2007 Information technology - Open Document Format for Office Applications:(OpenDocument) v1.0 (《정보기술-오픈도큐먼트양식》). Korean Agency for Technology and Standards. 2007. pp. 531-532. (This is a duplicate standard of ISO/IEC 26300:2006)
  4. ^ ―. KS X 6001 File Specification for Korean Document Interchange (《한글 워드프로세서에서의 문서 화일》). Korean Agency for Technology and Standards. 2005. pp. 16.

External links

  • Rules for Breaking Lines in Asian Languages, Microsoft Go Global Developer Center
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