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List of Tokyo Metro stations

Color-coded wall paneling helps passengers inside the Tokyo Metro Fukutoshin Line’s Shibuya Station to navigate passages to connecting rail lines. Shibuya is the busiest station on the Tokyo Metro network and a major interchange with Tōkyū, Keiō, and JR East trains.

List of Tokyo Metro stations lists stations on the Tokyo Metro, including lines serving the station, station location (ward or city), opening date, design (underground, at-grade, or elevated), and daily ridership.

Contents

  • Summary 1
  • Stations 2
    • Subway and commuter rail stations 2.1
    • Subway stations only 2.2
  • References 3

Summary

There are a total of 142 “unique” stations (i.e., counting stations served by multiple lines only once) on the Tokyo Metro network, or 179 total stations if each station on each line counts as one station.[1] Tokyo Metro considers Kokkai-gijidō-mae and Tameike-Sannō as a single interchange station, despite the two stations having different names. If these are treated as separate stations, there are a total of 143 unique stations and 180 total stations. Most stations are located within the 23 special wards and fall inside the Yamanote Line loop—some wards such as Setagaya and Ōta have no stations (or only a limited number of stations), as rail service in these areas has historically been provided by the Toei Subway or any of the various major private railways (大手私鉄).

In general, the reported daily ridership is the total of faregate entries and exits at each station, and excludes in-system transfers. However, Tokyo Metro reports ridership separately for stations directly shared with other railways—e.g., Shirokanedai and other Namboku Line stations shared with the Toei Mita Line—or “interface” stations that allow for through-servicing and transfers with other railways without exiting the station's paid area—e.g., Ayase on the Chiyoda Line. For stations directly shared with other railways, the daily ridership only considers people using Tokyo Metro trains (or through-servicing trains owned by other railways operating as Tokyo Metro trains). For interface stations, the daily ridership also includes cross-company passengers on through-servicing trains (as part of trackage rights agreements) or transferring from other railways' trains without passing through faregates.

Because of Tokyo Metro's reporting method, stations served by multiple lines that qualify both as shared or interface stations and as “regular” (i.e., not shared and non-interface) stations generally have their ridership separated out by station type. Examples include Shibuya, where ridership for the interconnected Hanzōmon Line and Fukutoshin Line stations (which are interface stations for the Tōkyū Den-en-toshi Line and Tōkyū Tōyoko Line, respectively) is separated out from ridership at the Shibuya terminal station of the Ginza Line, which does not have through-service arrangements with any other railways.

Opening dates are given in standard Japanese date format (YYYY.MM.DD), and arranged from oldest to newest for stations served by multiple lines.

Stations

Subway and commuter rail stations

Interface stations like Wakōshi Station are designed to facilitate through-service between Tokyo Metro and other railways, in this case between the Tōbu Tōjō Line and the Tokyo Metro Yūrakuchō and Fukutoshin Lines. In addition to passengers passing through faregates to or from Tokyo Metro trains, ridership reported for these stations also includes passengers entering or exiting the Tokyo Metro system inside through-servicing trains, as well as passengers making cross-platform transfers between Tokyo Metro trains and other railways’ trains.
Station Lines Ward or City Opening date Design Daily ridership
(FY2011)[1]
Shibuya Shibuya
1977.04.07
2008.06.14
Underground 580,367
Ayase
Adachi
1971.04.20
Elevated 433,614
Kita-Senju
Adachi
1962.05.31
At-grade, elevated 287,488
Nishi-Funabashi
Funabashi (Chiba)
1969.03.29
At-grade 271,057
Yoyogi-Uehara
Shibuya
1978.03.31
Elevated 225,658
Naka-Meguro
Meguro
1964.07.22
Elevated 180,954
Wakō-shi

Wakō (Saitama)
1987.08.25
Elevated 152,925
Nakano
Nakano
1966.03.16
Elevated 133,919
Kotake-Mukaihara

Nerima
1983.06.24
Underground 131,126
Oshiage
Sumida
2003.03.19
Underground 120,324
Meguro
Shinagawa
2000.09.26
Underground 94,530
Akabane Iwabuchi
Kita
1991.11.29
Underground 72,807
Shirokane-Takanawa
Minato
2000.09.26
Underground 39,497
Shirokanedai
Minato
2000.09.26
Underground 15,245

Subway stations only

Ōtemachi is one of the most important interchanges on the Tokyo Metro network, connecting four Tokyo Metro lines and one Toei Subway line. Ōtemachi Station is also connected by underground passages to an extensive station complex comprising Tōkyō Station, Nijūbashimae Station, Hibiya Station, Yūrakuchō Station, Ginza Station, and Higashi-Ginza Station.
Station Lines Ward or City Opening date Design Daily ridership
(FY2011)[1]
Ikebukuro


Toshima
1954.01.20
1974.10.30
1994.12.07
Underground 470,284
Kita-Senju
Adachi
1969.12.20
Underground 281,192
Ōtemachi



Chiyoda
1956.07.20
1966.10.01
1969.12.20
1989.01.26
Underground 269,848
Ginza


Chūō
1934.03.03
1957.12.15
1964.08.29
Underground 241,513
Shibuya
Shibuya
1938.12.20
Elevated 217,117
Shimbashi
Minato
1934.06.21
Underground 215,520
Shinjuku
Shinjuku
1959.03.15
Underground 212,024
Ueno

Taitō
1927.12.30
1961.03.28
Underground 201,602
Takadanobaba
Shinjuku
1969.03.29
Underground 181,871
Iidabashi


Chiyoda
Shinjuku
1964.12.23
1974.10.30
1996.03.26
Underground 166,452
Nihombashi

Chūō
1932.12.24
1967.09.14
Underground 165,816
Tōkyō
Chiyoda
1956.07.20
Underground 156,736
Nishi-Nippori
Arakawa
1969.12.20
Underground 156,404
Toyosu
Kōtō
1988.06.08
Underground 154,214
Yūrakuchō
Chiyoda
1974.10.30
Underground 147,303
Omotesandō


Minato
1938.11.18
1972.10.20
1978.08.01
Underground 143,772
Kudanshita

Chiyoda
1964.12.23
1989.01.26
Underground 140,405
Kokkai Gijidō-mae
Tameike-Sannō



Chiyoda
1959.03.15
1972.10.20
1997.09.30
1997.09.30
Underground 133,373
Kasumigaseki


Chiyoda
1958.10.15
1964.03.25
1971.03.20
Underground 128,226
Tōyōchō
Kōtō
1967.09.14
Underground 126,119
Ichigaya

Shinjuku
1974.10.30
1996.03.26
Underground 124,197
Akihabara
Chiyoda
1962.05.31
Underground 119,184
Roppongi
Minato
1964.03.25
Underground 118,067
Kayabachō

Chūō
1963.02.28
1967.09.14
Underground 117,903
Mitsukoshimae

Chūō
1932.04.29
1989.01.26
Underground 115,784
Monzen-Nakachō
Kōtō
1967.09.14
Underground 104,200
Hatchōbori
Chūō
1963.02.28
Underground 101,477
Toranomon
Minato
1938.11.18
Underground 100,641
Yotsuya

Shinjuku
1959.03.15
1996.03.26
Elevated
Underground
99,957
Akasaka Mitsuke

Minato
1938.11.18
1959.03.15
Underground 99,394
Aoyama-Itchōme

Minato
1938.11.18
1978.08.01
Underground 97,811
Shinjuku Sanchōme

Shinjuku
1959.03.15
2008.06.14
Underground 97,688
Kasai
Edogawa
1969.03.29
Elevated 95,750
Ebisu
Shibuya
1964.03.25
Underground 95,522
Nishi-Kasai
Edogawa
1979.10.01
Elevated 95,145
Shin-Kiba
Kōtō
1988.06.08
Elevated 93,783
Asakusa
Taitō
1927.12.30
Underground 90,967
Hibiya

Chiyoda
1964.08.29
1971.03.20
Underground 90,874
Kōrakuen

Bunkyō
1954.01.20
1996.03.26
Elevated
Underground
89,502
Shin-Ochanomizu
Chiyoda
1969.12.20
Underground 88,444
Jimbōchō
Chiyoda
1989.01.26
Underground 88,314
Kinshichō
Kōtō
2003.03.19
Underground 82,342
Akasaka
Minato
1972.10.20
Underground 80,361
Ningyōchō
Chūō
1962.05.31
Underground 77,154
Kamiyachō
Minato
1964.03.25
Underground 76,486
Gaienmae
Minato
1938.11.18
Underground 74,123
Urayasu
Urayasu (Chiba)
1969.03.29
Elevated 73,021
Kiba
Kōtō
1967.09.14
Underground 72,956
Higashi-Ginza
Chūō
1963.02.28
Underground 72,841
Meiji-Jingūmae

Shibuya
1972.10.20
2008.06.14
Underground 71,913
Hanzōmon
Chiyoda
1982.12.09
Underground 71,882
Waseda
Shinjuku
1964.12.23
Underground 70,733
Ogikubo
Suginami
1962.01.23
Underground 69,792
Suitengūmae
Chūō
1990.11.28
Underground 68,853
Tsukiji
Chūō
1963.02.28
Underground 67,153
Myōgadani
Bunkyō
1954.01.20
Underground 66,404
Nakano Sakaue
Nakano
1961.02.08
Underground 61,969
Nagatachō


Chiyoda
1974.10.30
1979.09.21
1997.09.30
Underground 59,379
Tsukishima
Chūō
1988.06.08
Underground 57,409
Minami-Sunamachi
Kōtō
1969.03.29
Underground 56,930
Hiroo
Minato
1964.03.25
Underground 55,448
Ōji
Kita
1991.11.29
Underground 54,464
Machiya
Arakawa
1969.12.20
Underground 54,174
Gyōtoku
Ichikawa (Chiba)
1969.03.29
Elevated 52,708
Awajichō
Chiyoda
1956.03.20
Underground 51,979
Ochanomizu
Bunkyō
1954.01.20
Underground 51,629
Kōjimachi
Chiyoda
1974.10.30
Underground 51,325
Nishi-Shinjuku
Shinjuku
1996.05.28
Underground 50,558
Takebashi
Chiyoda
1966.03.16
Underground 50,294
Roppongi-Itchōme
Minato
2000.09.26
Underground 49,425
Kanda
Chiyoda
1931.11.21
Underground 49,410
Edogawabashi
Bunkyō
1974.10.30
Underground 49,112
Minami-Gyōtoku
Ichikawa (Chiba)
1981.03.27
Elevated 48,898
Hongō-Sanchōme
Bunkyō
1954.01.20
Underground 47,819
Myōden
Ichikawa (Chiba)
2000.01.22
Elevated 45,346
Sumiyoshi
Kōtō
2003.03.19
Underground 43,767
Chikatetsu Narimasu

Itabashi
1983.06.24
Underground 43,643
Shinjuku-gyoemmae
Shinjuku
1959.03.15
Underground 42,525
Naka-Okachimachi
Taitō
1961.03.28
Underground 42,317
Kyōbashi
Chūō
1932.12.24
Underground 42,022
Kiyosumi-Shirakawa
Kōtō
2003.03.19
Underground 41,938
Azabu-Jūban
Minato
2000.09.26
Underground 41,257
Yotsuya-Sanchōme
Shinjuku
1959.03.15
Underground 40,421
Heiwadai

Nerima
1983.06.24
Underground 38,133
Kagurazaka
Shinjuku
1964.12.23
Underground 37,921
Nogizaka
Minato
1972.10.20
Underground 37,711
Shintomichō
Chūō
1980.03.27
Underground 37,440
Kodenmachō
Chūō
1962.05.31
Underground 37,337
Gokokuji
Bunkyō
1974.10.30
Underground 36,933
Minowa
Taitō
1961.03.28
Underground 35,051
Hikawadai

Nerima
1983.06.24
Underground 34,957
Komagome
Toshima
1991.11.29
Underground 34,403
Ginza-itchōme
Chūō
1974.10.30
Underground 33,658
Kanamechō

Toshima
1983.06.24
Underground 33,401
Higashi-Ikebukuro
Toshima
1974.10.30
Underground 32,925
Senkawa

Toshima
1983.06.24
Underground 32,694
Shin-Kōenji
Suginami
1961.11.01
Underground 32,336
Yushima
Bunkyō
1969.12.20
Underground 32,221
Ōji-Kamiya
Kita
1991.11.29
Underground 31,410
Nijūbashimae
Chiyoda
1971.03.20
Underground 31,130
Shin-Nakano
Nakano
1961.02.08
Underground 31,125
Hōnanchō
Suginami
1962.03.23
Underground 31,095
Chikatetsu Akatsuka

Nerima
1983.06.24
Underground 31,016
Higashi-Kōenji
Suginami
1964.09.18
Underground 30,833
Iriya
Taitō
1961.03.28
Underground 26,551
Nishi-Waseda
Shinjuku
2008.06.14
Underground 26,535
Tawaramachi
Taitō
1927.12.30
Underground 26,216
Tōdai-mae
Bunkyō
1996.03.26
Underground 25,646
Kita-Ayase
Adachi
1979.12.20
Elevated 25,225
Nezu
Bunkyō
1969.12.20
Underground 25,199
Minami-Senju
Arakawa
1961.03.28
Elevated 24,941
Tatsumi
Kōtō
1988.06.08
Underground 24,818
Sendagi
Bunkyō
1969.12.20
Underground 24,674
Baraki-Nakayama
Funabashi (Chiba)
1969.03.29
Elevated 23,423
Ochiai
Shinjuku
1966.03.16
Underground 22,366
Ueno-Hirokōji
Taitō
1930.01.01
Underground 21,631
Minami-Asagaya
Suginami
1961.11.01
Underground 21,611
Shin-Ōtsuka
Bunkyō
1954.01.20
Underground 21,375
Yoyogi-Kōen
Shibuya
1972.10.20
Underground 21,354
Suehirochō
Chiyoda
1930.01.01
Underground 20,426
Higashi-Shinjuku
Shinjuku
2008.06.14
Underground 20,188
Hon-Komagome
Bunkyō
1996.03.26
Underground 19,428
Nakano-Shimbashi
Nakano
1961.02.08
Underground 17,730
Nakano-Fujimichō
Nakano
1961.02.04
Underground 17,671
Inarichō
Taitō
1927.12.30
Underground 13,904
Kita-Sandō
Shibuya
2008.06.14
Underground 13,183
Sakuradamon
Chiyoda
1974.10.30
Underground 13,062
Zōshigaya
Toshima
2008.06.14
Underground 12,799
Shimo
Kita
1991.11.29
Underground 9,905
Nishigahara
Kita
1991.11.29
Underground 6,201

References

  1. ^ a b c
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