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Lynn and Inner Dowsing Wind Farm

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Title: Lynn and Inner Dowsing Wind Farm  
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Subject: List of offshore wind farms in the United Kingdom, Wind power in the United Kingdom, Lindhurst Wind Farm, Burton Wold Wind Farm, Triton Knoll
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Lynn and Inner Dowsing Wind Farm

Lynn and Inner Dowsing Wind Farm
Inner Dowsing Offshore Wind Farm
Lynn and Inner Dowsing Wind Farm is located in England
Lynn and Inner Dowsing Wind Farm
Location of Lynn and Inner Dowsing Wind Farm
Country England, United Kingdom
Location Off the coast of Lincolnshire in the entrance to The Wash
Coordinates
Status Operational
Commission date March 2009
Construction cost £725 million
Owner(s) Centrica
Wind farm
Distance from shore 5.2 km (3.2 mi)
Power generation
Units operational 54 × Siemens Wind Power 3.6MW turbines
Make and model Siemens Wind Power
Nameplate capacity 194 MW

Lynn and Inner Dowsing Wind Farm is located in the North Sea, in the shallow waters off the coast of Lincolnshire, England. Completed on time and on budget in 2008, its 54 Siemens Wind Power 3.6-107 wind turbines have a generating capacity of 194 MW, enough to power 130,000 homes on average.[1]

The Lynn and Inner Dowsing wind farms are part of the UKCS Round 1 developments to encourage wind power in the UK. They are two neighbouring developments that were acquired in December 2003 and combined into one construction project by Centrica Renewable Energy Limited. Both wind farms, operated by Centrica, are located off the UK's East Lincolnshire coast. Lynn is 5.2 km offshore Skegness, and Inner Dowsing is 5.2 km offshore Ingoldmells.

Construction

This offshore wind farm cost more than £300m and was built in depths of up to 18 metres (59 ft) of water, in less than two years. The foundations used are monopiles of 4.7m diameter installed by drive penetration using a hydraulic hammer. The foundations were driven to depth of around 22m below the seabed before a transition piece was installed on top of the pile and secured in place using a grouted bond. The wind turbine and its supporting tower was then installed onto a flange attached onto the transition piece and secured by bolts. The blades were made in Denmark from balsa wood and fibreglass.[1]

As of January 2009, Britain is the world's leading generator of offshore wind power, followed by Denmark.[1]

TIV Resolution installing wind turbines, June 2007

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Patrick Barkham. Blown away The Guardian, 8 January 2009.

External links

  • LORC Knowledge - Datasheet for Lynn and Inner Dowsing
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