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Māngere (New Zealand electorate)

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Māngere (New Zealand electorate)

Māngere electorate boundaries used since the 2008 election

Māngere, styled as Mangere before 1997, is a New Zealand parliamentary electorate, returning one member of parliament to the Representatives of New Zealand. The current MP for Māngere is Su'a William Sio,[1] elected for the Labour Party. He has held this electorate since 2008.

Population centres

Māngere is based around the South Auckland suburbs of Mangere, Mangere Bridge, Favona and Mangere East. It has existed as an electorate since 1969; its boundaries were extended ahead of the introduction of mixed-member proportional (MMP) voting in 1996, swallowing up a section of the former Papatoetoe electorate.

In the 2007 boundary redistribution, Papatoetoe and Middlemore were transferred to the Manukau East electorate.[2] The 2013/14 redistribution did not change the boundaries further.[3]

History

Māngere, and all of South Auckland, forms the safest part of the Labour Party's core vote. Even during landslide elections in the National Party's favour, such as in 1975 and 1990, no Labour candidate for a South Auckland seat was seriously troubled.

Māngere was first represented by Colin Moyle of the Labour Party in 1969. Moyle represented the electorate until his resignation in 1977 over what became known as the 'Moyle Affair', and a subsequent by-election was won by a young barrister named David Lange, who would become Prime Minister after Labour's 1984 election victory. Lange retired in 1996 and the nomination was handed to Taito Phillip Field, at the time the MP for Otara. Field was returned with a high share of the vote in subsequent elections, but following his expulsion from the Labour caucus in 2007, his former party nominated former Manukau City deputy mayor Su'a William Sio in his place, who won the seat with a majority of over 7,000 votes in the 2008 election.[1] In the 2011 and 2014 elections, Sio's majority was circa 15,000 votes.[4][5]

Members of Parliament

Unless otherwise stated, all MPs terms began and started at general elections.

Key

 Labour    National  
Election Winner
1969 election Colin Moyle
1972 election
1975 election
1977 by-election David Lange
1978 election
1981 election
1984 election
1987 election
1990 election
1993 election
1996 election Taito Phillip Field[nb 1]
1999 election
2002 election
2005 election
2008 election Su'a William Sio
2011 election
2014 election

List MPs

Members of parliament elected from party lists in elections where that person also unsuccessfully contested the Māngere electorate. Unless otherwise stated, all MPs terms began and ended at general elections.

Election Winner
2005 election Clem Simich

Election results

2011 election

General election 2011: Māngere[4]

Notes: Green background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
Labour Green tickY Su'a William Sio 18,177 75.90 +23.49 17,960 71.82 +10.22
National Claudette Hauiti 3,018 12.60 -1.35 3,592 14.36 -2.07
Green Todd Ross 1,030 4.30 +2.06 962 3.85 +1.81
NZ First Olivia Ilalio 597 2.49 +2.49 1,466 5.86 +2.55
Conservative Fa'avae Gagamoe 584 2.44 +2.44 402 1.61 +1.61
Mana James Papali'i 422 1.76 +1.76 252 1.01 +1.01
ACT Casey Costello 121 0.51 -0.52 77 0.31 -0.81
Māori   134 0.54 -0.43
Legalise Cannabis   95 0.38 -0.003
United Future   49 0.20 -0.67
Alliance   14 0.06 +0.03
Libertarianz   4 0.02 -0.01
Democrats   0 0.00 -0.01
Informal votes 856 518
Total Valid votes 23,949 25,007
Labour hold Majority 15,159 63.30 +33.78

Electorate (as at 26 November 2011): 39,534[6]

2008 election

General election 2008: Māngere[7]

Notes: Green background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
Labour Su'a William Sio 12,651 52.40 15,446 61.60
Pacific Red XN Taito Lemalu Phillip Field 5,525 22.89 2,683 10.70
National Mita Harris 3,368 13.95 4,120 16.43
Family Party Galumalemana Jerry Filipaina 999 4.14 297 1.18
Green Muamua Sofi Strickson-Pua 541 2.24 511 2.04
United Future Pulotu Selio Solomon 443 1.84 218 0.87
ACT Michael Tabachnik 247 1.02 280 1.12
RAM Roger Fowler 154 0.64 16 0.06
Progressive Tala Po'e 150 0.62 165 0.66
Independent Lemalu Talia Matatumua 63 0.26
NZ First   830 3.31
Māori   241 0.96
Legalise Cannabis   96 0.38
Bill and Ben   75 0.30
Kiwi   65 0.26
Workers Party   16 0.06
Alliance   6 0.02
Libertarianz   6 0.02
Democrats   2 0.01
RONZ   1 0.00
Informal votes 411 279
Total Valid votes 24,141 25,074
Labour hold Majority 7,126 29.52

Note: lines coloured beige denote the winner of the electorate vote. Lines coloured pink denote a candidate elected to Parliament from their party list.

2005 election

General election, 2005 - Mangere[8]
Party Candidate Votes % Party Votes %
Labour Green tickY Taito Phillip Field 19633 70.64 20900 72.89
National Clem Simich 3613 13.00 3894 13.58
Destiny Edward Saafi 892 3.21 445 1.55
NZ First Toa Greening 831 2.99 1189 4.15
Green Mua Strickson-Pua 767 2.76 503 1.75
United Neville Wilson 573 2.06 467 1.63
Māori Party Solomon Matthews 522 1.88 330 1.15
Progressive Tala Po'e 341 1.23 429 1.50
Family Rights PP Susie Po'a Williams 305 1.10 184 0.64
Alliance Len Richards 204 0.73 48 0.17
Direct Democracy Paul Teio 56 0.20 7 0.02
IND Mark Muller 56 0.20
ACT 141 0.49
ALCP 59 0.21
Christian Heritage 42 0.15
One NZ 8 0.03
Democrats 5 0.02
Libertarianz 5 0.02
99 MP 2 0.01
Republic of NZ 2 0.01
informal votes 453 293
total valid votes 27,793 28,674
Labour hold Majority 16,020

1996 election

General election 1996: Mangere[9][10][11]

Notes: Green background denotes the winner of the electorate vote.
Pink background denotes a candidate elected from their party list.
Yellow background denotes an electorate win by a list member.
A Green tickY or Red XN denotes status of any incumbent, win or lose respectively.

Party Candidate Votes % ±% Party Votes % ±%
Labour Taito Phillip Field 13,277 55.94 13,118 54.77
National David Broome 3,960 16.68 4,230 17.66
Alliance Len Richards 3,190 13.44 2,134 8.91
NZ First Thomas Moana 1,972 8.31 2,426 10.13
Christian Coalition James Ward 563 2.37 728 3.04
ACT Kevin Mathewson 409 1.72 492 2.05
Advance New Zealand Afamasaga Rasmussen 180 0.76 88 0.37
United NZ Francis Ifopo 94 0.40 105 0.44
Natural Law Grant Bilyard 90 0.38 57 0.24
Legalise Cannabis   330 1.38
Ethnic Minority Party 55 0.23
Progressive Greens   49 0.20
McGillicuddy Serious   44 0.18
Animals First   42 0.18
Green Society   13 0.05
Mana Māori   11 0.05
Asia Pacific United 9 0.04
Libertarianz   9 0.04
Superannuitants & Youth   7 0.03
Conservatives   5 0.02
Te Tawharau 0 0.00
Informal votes 469 252
Total Valid votes 23,735 23,952
Labour hold Majority 9,317 39.25

Footnotes

  1. ^ Field was expelled from the Labour caucus on 14 February 2007.

References

  1. ^ a b Official Count Results – Mängere
  2. ^ "Mana: Electoral Profile" (PDF).  
  3. ^ Report of the Representation Commission 2014 (PDF). Representation Commission. 4 April 2014. p. 9.  
  4. ^ a b "Official Count Results -- Māngere".  
  5. ^ "Official Count Results -- Māngere".  
  6. ^ "Enrolment statistics". Electoral Commission. 26 November 2011. Retrieved 26 November 2011. 
  7. ^ "Official Count Results -- Māngere". Chief Electoral Office. 22 November 2008. Retrieved 5 October 2014. 
  8. ^ "Official Count Results -- Mangere".  
  9. ^ "Electorate Candidate and Party Votes Recorded at Each Polling Place - Mangere, 1996" (PDF). Retrieved 20 July 2013. 
  10. ^ "Part III - Party Lists of Successful Registered Parties" (PDF). Electoral Commission. Retrieved 22 June 2013. 
  11. ^ "Part III - Party Lists of unsuccessful Registered Parties" (PDF). Electoral Commission. Retrieved 22 June 2013. 

External links

  • Electorate Profile Parliamentary Library
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