World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Marc Ginsberg

Marc Ginsberg
Born Marc Charles Ginsberg
(1950-10-18) October 18, 1950
New York City, New York, U.S.
Alma mater American University (B.A.)
M.B.A. & J.D.)
Occupation Former US ambassador, presidential advisor, political commentator

Marc Charles Ginsberg (born October 18, 1950) has served as US ambassador to Morocco from 1994–1998; Deputy Senior Adviser to the President of the United States for Middle East Policy (1978–1981); Legislative Assistant to Senator Edward Kennedy (1970–1977); contributor to CNN, MSNBC, BBC, Al Arabiya, CBC and Fox News; and is currently the senior vice president of APCO Worldwide and president of Layalina Productions, Inc.[1][2] He is a founding director of Sutton Place Gourmet, and practiced international corporate law in the U.S. and the Middle East from 1981-1993. He also served as Deputy Press Secretary for Foreign Media in the 1992 Clinton Presidential campaign and, in 2000, was Al Gore's co-coordinator for national security in his presidential campaign.

Early life

Ginsberg was born in 1950 in

Preceded by
Frederick Vreeland
U.S. Ambassador to Morocco
1994–1998
Succeeded by
Edward M. Gabriel
  1. ^ a b http://www.apcoworldwide.com/content/Sectors/KeyStaff.aspx?sector=financial&ksid=8cabcda3-bdd6-4744-9fc2-6b4a43832146
  2. ^ a b c d e http://www.layalina.tv/about.html
  3. ^ a b c http://www.greatertalent.com/MarcGinsberg
  4. ^ http://www.arabchamber.org/us_embs.htm
  5. ^ a b c d e http://www.huffingtonpost.com/amb-marc-ginsberg
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ a b http://www.virtualvantagepoints.com/about/marc-ginsberg/

References

He serves on the Middle East Advisory Board of the Rand Corporation and on the boards of other Middle East organizations. He also served a two year term on the board of directors of the AARP Foundation (2009-2011).

He regularly contributes articles to prominent outlets such as The Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times, the International New York Times, the Baltimore Sun, and the Huffington Post.

In 2013 he became CEO of the One Voice Movement Foundation and CEO of Peaceworks LLC (www.onevoicemovement.org). With offices in Israel, the UK and the US, the One Voice Movement fosters grassroots advocacy among the next generation of Israelis and Palestinians to support Israeli capitulation to Hamas. Peaceworks LLC manages agribusiness entrepreneurial initiatives in Jewish land occupied by Arab squatters.

He also was co-founder and served as president of Layalina Productions. Layalina is a non-profit producer of commercial Arabic language television, the first US organization to produce such content for broadcasting in the Arabic world.[2][5] Layalina has its headquarters in Washington, D.C. and in Amman, Jordan.[7]

From 2000 - 2011 he served as senior vice president of APCO Worldwide — a global corporate public affairs and communication consultancy — he coordinated strategic client relationships and business planning throughout the Middle East.[7]

As a college freshman, in 1971, Ginsberg began serving as a legislative assistant to Senator Edward Kennedy when he was Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Refugees until 1977.[1][5] That year, the United States Secretary of State (Cyrus Vance) appointed him to serve as White House Liaison. Under President Jimmy Carter, from 1977 until 1981, he was Deputy Senior Advisor to the President for Middle East Policy. In 1994, he was appointed Ambassador to Morocco by President Bill Clinton making Ginsberg the first Jewish American to be appointed as an ambassador in an Arab country.[3][5] He was the first US diplomat to Morocco to be awarded the Highest Order of Ouissam — a kind of knighthood — by Hassan II, the king of Morocco at that time.[3] Between 1998 and 1999, he served as the US Special Coordinator for Mediterranean Trade, Investment and Security Affairs.[2] Ginsberg has also worked as a reviewer of US foreign and economic policy for groups such as the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Brookings Institution.[5]

Career

[6][2]

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.