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Massimiliano Narducci

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Title: Massimiliano Narducci  
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Subject: 1989 ATP Challenger Series, 1988 Grand Prix (tennis), 1988 Australian Open – Men's Singles, 1988 French Open – Men's Singles, 1987 ATP Challenger Series
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Massimiliano Narducci

Massimiliano Narducci
Country Italy
Born 25 February 1964
Ascoli Piceno, Italy
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Plays Right-handed
Prize money $105,308
Singles
Career record 18-27
Career titles 1
Highest ranking No. 77 (23 May 1988)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 2R (1988)
French Open 2R (1988)
Wimbledon 1R (1988)
US Open 1R (1988)

Massimiliano Narducci (born 25 February 1964) is a former professional tennis player from Italy.[1]

Narducci won his only tournament on the ATP Tour in 1988 at Florence. He also appeared in the singles draw of all four Grand Slams, making the second round in both Australia and France. In the Australian Open he defeated American player Mike Bauer in five sets. He met fifth seed Yannick Noah in the next round and took the first set off him, in a tiebreak, but then lost the next three sets. At the French Open he eliminated Joey Rive in the opening round, before losing to Andre Agassi.[2]

In 1989 he put in some good doubles performances with his partner Omar Camporese. They reached the quarter finals at Monte Carlo and the semi finals in Milan. That year, Narducci also played two Davis Cup singles match for the Italian team against Sweden. He lost both, in five setters, to Jonas Svensson Mikael Pernfors.[3]

Grand Prix career finals

Singles: 1 (1–0)

Outcome No. Year Tournament Surface Opponent in the final Score
Winner 1. 1988 Florence, Italy Clay Claudio Panatta 3–6, 6–1, 6–4

References

  1. ^ ITF Tennis Profile
  2. ^ ATP Tour Profile
  3. ^ Davis Cup Profile
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