World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Mattatuck State Forest

Article Id: WHEBN0012243018
Reproduction Date:

Title: Mattatuck State Forest  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Plymouth, Connecticut, List of Connecticut state parks
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Mattatuck State Forest

Mattatuck State Forest
View of Mattatuck State Forest looking northeast from Crane's Lookout above Leatherman's Cave.
Map of Connecticut
Location Litchfield, Hartford and New Haven Counties
Nearest city Waterbury, CT
Coordinates

41°38′42″N 73°05′27″W / 41.6449°N 73.0907°W / 41.6449; -73.0907Coordinates: 41°38′42″N 73°05′27″W / 41.6449°N 73.0907°W / 41.6449; -73.0907

Area 4,000 acres (1,600 ha)
Established 1926
Governing body Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (CT DEEP)

Mattatuck State Forest is located between Waterbury, Connecticut to the south, East Litchfield, Connecticut to the north, Bristol, Connecticut to the East, and Bethlehem, Connecticut to the west. The Naugatuck River runs through a portion of the forest. The largest section of the forest is located about 1-mile (1.6 km) north of Waterbury.

A popular rock climbing area, Whitestone, is within the largest section of forest just east of the Naugatuck River. Top-roping techniques are used for heights of about 50 feet (15 m). Trail access is from South Street.

Hiking is a favorite activity in Mattatuck State Forest. The Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection published a map of the Thomaston and Watertown sections in June 2011 that may be found at their website.[1]

The Leatherman's Cave, named after the vagabond Leatherman of the late 1800s, is located in Thomaston on the Mattatuck Trail, just north of the junction with the Jericho Trail.[1]

Other maps and descriptions of the Blue-Blazed Trails in the forest are available in the Connecticut Walk Book West,[2] published by the Connecticut Forest and Park Association.

Trails in the forest on the west side of Route 8 include the following: The 3.4-mile Jericho Trail, which runs from Echo Lake Road in Watertown to the junction of the Mattatuck Trail, just west of Crane's Overlook and the Leatherman's Cave. Most of the 0.8-mile Branch Brook Trail is located in the forest, south of Reynolds Bridge Road in the town of Watertown.

Trails in the forest on the east side of Route 8 include the following: The 2.8-mile Hancock Brook Trail, which parallels the Waterbury Branch of Metro North. The 1.7-mile Whitestone Cliffs Trail, located off Connecticut Route 262.

The following trails are located on both sides of Connecticut Route 8: The 1.6-mile long Jericho-Whitestone Connector runs from Connecticut Route 262 to the Whitestone Cliffs Trail on the east side of Connecticut Route 8 in the towns of Thomaston and Plymouth. The Jericho-Whitestone Connector enters the forest north of the powerlines near Echo Lake Road in Watertown where it ends at the Jericho Trail.

The Mattatuck Trail traverses several blocks of the forest: In Plymouth, on the east side of Connecticut Route 8, the trail passes along an isolated block of the forest south of Scott Road, and another section south of Lake Plymouth extending to Mount Tobe Road. In Thomaston, on the east side of Connecticut Route 8, from Carter Road to Waterbury Road. In Watertown, on the west side of Connecticut Route 8, the trail passes by the highway, just south of Reynolds Bridge Road and extends to Bidwell Hill Road, where the trail enters the Black Rock State Park.

References

External links

  • Mattatuck State Forest: Thomaston and Watertown. Conn. Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.
  • Letterboxing in Mattatuck State Forest.
  • Connecticut Forest & Park Association.
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.