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Military operation

 

Military operation

A military operation is the coordinated military actions of a state in response to a developing situation. These actions are designed as a military plan to resolve the situation in the state's favor. Operations may be of a combat or non-combat nature and are referred to by a code name for the purpose of security. Military operations are often known for their more generally accepted common usage names than their actual operational objectives.

Contents

  • Types of military operations 1
  • Operational level of war 2
  • See also 3
  • Notes 4
  • References 5

Types of military operations

Military operations can be classified by the scale and scope of force employment, and their impact on the wider conflict. The scope of military operations can be:

Operational level of war

The operational level of war occupies roughly the middle ground between the campaign's strategic focus and the tactics of an engagement. It describes "a distinct intermediate level of war between military strategy, governing war in general, and tactics, involving individual battles".[2] For example, during World War II, the concept applied to use of Soviet Tank Armies.[3]

See also


Notes

  1. ^ Glantz, Soviet Military Operational Art, p.46.
  2. ^ Glantz, Soviet Military Operational Art, p.10.
  3. ^ Armstrong, Red Army Tank Commanders, p.13.

References

  • Armstrong, Richard N. Red Army Tank Commanders: The Armored Guards. Atglen, Penn.: Schiffer Military History, 1994. ISBN 0-88740-581-9.
  • Glantz, David M. Soviet Military Operational Art: In Pursuit of Deep Battle. London: Frank Cass, 1991. ISBN 0-7146-3362-3, ISBN 0-7146-4077-8.
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