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Monemvasia

Monemvasia
Μονεμβασία
Monemvasia island
Monemvasia island
Monemvasia is located in Greece
Monemvasia
Coordinates:
Country Greece
Administrative region Peloponnese
Regional unit Laconia
Area
 • Municipality 947.0 km2 (365.6 sq mi)
Elevation 15 m (49 ft)
Population (2011)[1]
 • Municipality 21,942
 • Municipality density 23/km2 (60/sq mi)
 • Municipal unit 4,041
Community
 • Population 1418
Time zone EET (UTC+2)
 • Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3)
Postal code 230 70
Area code(s) 27320
Vehicle registration ΑΚ
Monemvasia municipality

Monemvasia (Greek: Μονεμβασία) is a town and a municipality in Laconia, Greece. The town is located on a small island off the east coast of the Peloponnese. The island is linked to the mainland by a short causeway 200m in length. Its area consists mostly of a large plateau some 100 metres above sea level, up to 300 m wide and 1 km long, the site of a powerful medieval fortress. The town walls and many Byzantine churches remain from the medieval period. The seat of the municipality is the town Molaoi.[2]

The town's name derives from two Greek words, mone and emvasia, meaning "single entrance". Its Italian form, Malvasia, gave its name to Malmsey wine. Monemvasia's nickname is the Gibraltar of the East or The Rock.

Contents

  • Geography 1
  • Municipality 2
  • History 3
    • Early History 3.1
    • Middle Ages 3.2
    • Modern times 3.3
  • Places of interest 4
  • Historical population 5
  • Notable people 6
  • Gallery 7
  • See also 8
  • References 9
  • Further reading 10
  • External links 11

Geography

The island of Monemvasia was separated from the mainland by an earthquake in 375 AD. The majority of the island's area is a plateau about 100 metres above sea level, and the town of the same name is built on the slope to the south-east of the rock, overlooking Palaia Monemvasia bay. Many of the streets are narrow and fit only for pedestrian and donkey traffic. A small hamlet of about 10 houses lies to the northwest.

Municipality

The municipality Monemvasia was formed during the 2011 local government reform through the merger of the following 5 former municipalities, that became municipal units:[2]

History

Early History

While uninhabited in antiquity, the rock may have been the site of a Minoan trading post. Pausanias, the renowned Greek traveler and geographer, referred to the site as "Akra Minoa", which translates to "Minoan Promontory".[3]

Middle Ages

Map made by F. de Witt, Amsterdam, 1680.
Street of Monemvasia.

The town and fortress were founded in 583 by inhabitants of the mainland seeking refuge from the Slavic and the Avaric invasion of Greece. A history of the invasion and occupation of the Peloponnese was recorded in the medieval Chronicle of Monemvasia.

Main Square.

From the 10th century AD, the town developed into an important trade and maritime centre. The fortress withstood the Arab and Norman invasions in 1147; farm fields that fed up to 30 men were tilled inside the fortress. William II of Villehardouin took it in 1248, on honourable terms, after three years of siege; in 1259 William was captured by the Greeks after the battle of Pelagonia and in 1262 it was retroceded to Michael VIII Palaiologos as part of William's ransom.

It remained part of the Byzantine Empire until 1460, becoming the seat of an imperial governor, a landing place for Byzantine operations against the Franks, the main port of shipment (if not always production) for Malmsey wine, and one of the most dangerous lairs of corsairs in the Levant. The Emperors gave it valuable privileges, attracting [4]

By 1464 the inhabitants found the Pope's representative feeble and the Pope unable to protect them; they admitted a Venetian garrison. The town was fairly prosperous under Venetian rule until the peace of 1502-3, in which it lost its farm lands, source of its food supply and of Malmsey wine. The food had to come by sea or from Turkish-held lands, and the cultivation of wine languished under Turkish rule. The rock was governed by the Venetians until the treaty of 1540, which cost the Republic [4] The Ottomans then ruled the town until the brief Venetian recovery in 1690, then again from 1715 to 1821. It was known as "Menekşe" ("Violet" in Turkish) during Ottoman rule and was a sanjak (province) centre in the Morea Eyalet.

The commercial importance of the town continued until the Orlov Revolt (1770) in the Russo-Turkish War, which saw its importance decline severely.

The town was liberated from Ottoman rule on July 23, 1821 by Tzannetakis Grigorakis who entered the town with his private army during the Greek War of Independence.

Modern times

In 1971, Monemvasia became linked with the rest of the outside world through a bridge on the western side that connects to GR-86.

In more recent history, the town has seen a resurgence in importance with increasing numbers of tourists visiting the site and the region. The medieval buildings have been restored, and many of them converted to hotels.

For the past few years, on July 23rd there is an independence day celebration in the main port. Speeches are made and the story of Tzannetakis Grigorakis, and his men, is recounted in both Greek and English. Inhabitants and visitors can gather to watch as a ship, built every year, is filled with pyrotechnics and set on fire.[5]

Places of interest

  • Christos Elkomenos Square
  • The church of Agia Sophia
  • The fortress

Historical population

Year Community Municipal unit Municipality
1981 707 - -
2001 1,405 4,660 -
2011 1,418 4,041 21,942

Notable people

Gallery

See also

References

  1. ^ "Απογραφή Πληθυσμού - Κατοικιών 2011. ΜΟΝΙΜΟΣ Πληθυσμός" (in Greek). Hellenic Statistical Authority. 
  2. ^ a b Kallikratis law Greece Ministry of Interior (Greek)
  3. ^ Emke,Ellie. Discover Monemvasia: A guide to its past and present, Lichnos ltd, 1990, p,12.
  4. ^ a b Miller, William (1907). "Monemvasia during the Frankish period 1204–1540".  
  5. ^ "Events in Monemvasia". Monemvasiatour.com. Retrieved 27 February 2015. 

Further reading

  • Klaus, Rainer W., Steinmüller, Ulrich: Monemvasia. The Town and its History. English Version by Lawrence P. Buck. 9th, revised edition. Athens 2007

External links

  • Monemvasia | The official Tourism Website
  • Monemvassia
  • GTP - Monemvasia
  • 360 Virtual Panoramic Photo Tour - Monemvasia Castle Walkthrough
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