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New Holstein, Wisconsin

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New Holstein, Wisconsin

New Holstein, Wisconsin
City
Main Street in New Holstein
Main Street in New Holstein
Location of New Holstein, Wisconsin
Location of New Holstein, Wisconsin
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Wisconsin
County Calumet
Area[1]
 • Total 2.50 sq mi (6.47 km2)
 • Land 2.50 sq mi (6.47 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation[2] 932 ft (284 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 3,236
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 3,251
 • Density 1,294.4/sq mi (499.8/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Area code(s) 920
FIPS code 55-56800[5]
GNIS feature ID 1570219[2]
Website .gov.wi.newholsteinci

New Holstein is a city in Calumet County in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. The population was 3,236 at the 2010 census. The city is located within the Town of New Holstein.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Geography 2
  • Demographics 3
    • 2010 census 3.1
    • 2000 census 3.2
  • Education 4
  • Notable people 5
  • Landmarks 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

History

New Holstein is named after the Schleswig-Holstein region in Germany from which many early settlers emigrated.[6] In 1848, 70 people from Hamburg, Germany emigrated to the New Holstein area,[7] forming the basis of what would become the present city. Many settlers were intellectuals who feared an impending war as a result of competing claims to the territory.[8] Settlers originally named the community Altona after Altona, Hamburg, Germany.[9] As the amount of mail received in Altona increased, the United States Post Office wanted Altona to be renamed because the community's name was too close to Altoona in western Wisconsin.[9]

In the early years, settlers traveled for supplies to Calumetville, Wisconsin, a larger neighboring community.[10] Wild game, such as passenger pigeons, was available for food.[10]

The first settlers in the city were Charles Greening and two of his companions.[11] Dr. Charles Bock arrived shortly afterwards. The first

  • City of New Holstein
  • New Holstein Chamber of Commerce
  • Sanborn fire insurance maps: 1894 1900 1911

External links

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010".  
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  4. ^ "Population Estimates".  
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  6. ^ http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/eng/mi_qn4196/is_20041121/ai_n11002961/pg_2. 
  7. ^ a b c Pioneer's Corner, p 169
  8. ^ Pioneer's Corner, p. 47
  9. ^ a b c d Pioneer's Corner, p. 57-58
  10. ^ a b New Holstein Historical Society. Pioneer's Corner. p. 6. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f "Looking Back/Calumet County History - 1881".  
  12. ^ Pioneer's Corner, pp. 12-13
  13. ^ a b Pioneer's Corner, p. 10
  14. ^ http://www.ci.new-holstein.wi.us/citygovtofficials.shtml
  15. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  16. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  17. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  18. ^ New Holstein School District

References

Landmarks

Notable people

The city is served by the School District of New Holstein, which includes New Holstein High School, New Holstein Middle School and New Holstein Elementary School.[18] The city is also home to a private Roman Catholic elementary school that it shares with neighboring city Kiel.

Education

The median income for a household in the city was $43,180, and the median income for a family was $48,173. Males had a median income of $35,932 versus $23,750 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,911. About 1.2% of families and 3.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.2% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.

In the city the population was spread out with 22.7% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 26.4% from 25 to 44, 23.8% from 45 to 64, and 20.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 92.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.7 males.

There were 1,329 households out of which 29.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.3% were married couples living together, 8.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.3% were non-families. 29.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 2.88.

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 3,301 people, 1,329 households, and 886 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,415.9 people per square mile (547.0/km²). There were 1,394 housing units at an average density of 597.9 per square mile (231.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 98.49% White, 0.03% Black or African American, 0.24% Native American, 0.24% Asian, 0.09% from other races, and 0.91% from two or more races. 0.58% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

2000 census

The median age in the city was 44.7 years. 20.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.7% were from 25 to 44; 27.3% were from 45 to 64; and 22.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 50.0% male and 50.0% female.

There were 1,394 households of which 26.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.2% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 36.4% were non-families. 31.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.25 and the average family size was 2.82.

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 3,236 people, 1,394 households, and 887 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,294.4 inhabitants per square mile (499.8/km2). There were 1,520 housing units at an average density of 608.0 per square mile (234.8/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.4% White, 0.2% African American, 0.5% Native American, 0.6% Asian, 1.5% from other races, and 0.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.2% of the population.

2010 census

Demographics

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.50 square miles (6.47 km2), all of it land.[1]

New Holstein is located at (43.948185, -88.090931).[15]

Geography

The current mayor is Dianne K. Reese. The current chief of police is Brian Reedy. The current fire chief is Denis Mayer.[14]

For more information about New Holstein history, visit the New Holstein Historical Society website. http://www.newholsteinhistory.info

[13] The first city council was: Mayor Edward Funke, City Clerk Harvey C. Hansen, City Council President Peter Hass, Aldermen [13] New Holstein became a city in April 1926.

In 1900 the census reported a population of 569.[7] New Holstein was incorporated as a village the following year. The first lights were installed in the city in 1912.[7]

By 1881, the community comprised about 400 residents, all of whom were either Germans or of German descent.[11] The village covered over one square mile.[11] That year it had two public halls, three hotels, a fire insurance company, and a cemetery. New Holstein's principal business was a flour mill.[11] Near the railroad depot was a grain elevator owned by Herman Timm.

Railroad service was planned at meetings in 1871. A depot was built and the railroad arrived in 1872.[12] The railroad named the station "New Holstein" after the town.[9] Mail then came to the community on trains instead of via the Pony Express. The first post office was built shortly after rail service started.[9]

[11]

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