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Over-the-top content

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Title: Over-the-top content  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: MyTV (Arabic), Select-TV, Smart TV, Hong Kong Television Network, Inview Technology
Collection: Broadcasting, E-Commerce, Internet Television, Net Neutrality
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Over-the-top content

In broadcasting, over-the-top content (OTT) refers to delivery of audio, video, and other media over the Internet without the involvement of a multiple-system operator in the control or distribution of the content. The Internet provider may be aware of the contents of the Internet Protocol packets but is not responsible for, nor able to control, the viewing abilities, copyrights, and/or other redistribution of the content. This model contrasts with the purchasing or rental of video or audio content from an Internet service provider (ISP), such as pay television video on demand or an IPTV video service, like AT&T U-Verse. OTT in particular refers to content that arrives from a third party, such as Amazon Instant Video, Dramatize, DramaFever, Crackle, HBO, Hulu, myTV, NetD, Netflix, Now TV, Qello, RPI TV, Viewster, WhereverTV, or WWE Network, and is delivered to an end-user device, leaving the ISP only the role of transporting IP packets.

An online video distributor (OVD) is defined in FCC 13-99 as "any entity that offers video content by means of the Internet or other Internet Protocol (IP)-based transmission path provided by a person or entity other than the OVD."[1]

Over-the-top messaging refers to a similar idea, where a third party provides instant messaging services as an alternative to text messaging services provided by a mobile network operator.[2]

Consumers can access OTT content through internet-connected devices such as desktop and laptop computers, gaming consoles (such as the PlayStation 4, WiiU, and Xbox One), set-top boxes (such as the Roku), smartphones (including Android phones, iPhones, and Windows phones), smart TVs (such as Google TV), and tablets. Consumers can access apps in most app stores.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Adopts 15th Report On Video Competition".  
  2. ^ "CHART OF THE DAY: Mobile Messaging". Business Insider. 2013-05-17. 
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