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Royal Regiment of Canada

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Royal Regiment of Canada

Not to be confused with The Royal Canadian Regiment.
The Royal Regiment of Canada
200px
Cap badge of the Royal Regiment of Canada
Active 14 Mar 1862-
Country Canada
Branch Militia/Canadian Army-Primary Reserves
Type Line Infantry
Role Light Role
Size One battalion
Part of Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Garrison/HQ Fort York Armoury, Toronto
Nickname The Royals
Motto Honi soit qui mal y pense (Shame to he who thinks evil of it)
Ready Aye Ready
Nec Aspera Terrent (Difficulties be Damned)
Ich Dien (I Serve)
March Quick: The British Grenadiers/Here's To The Maiden

Slow: Scipio

Commanders
Colonel in Chief HRH The Prince of Wales
Commanding Officer Lieutenant-Colonel Jesse R. W. Jones, CD
"The British Grenadiers"
File:British Grenadiers.ogg
"The British Grenadiers", performed here by the United States Army Band Strings ensemble, serves as the authorized march of several British Commonwealth military regiments.

Problems playing this file? See media help.

The Royal Regiment of Canada is an infantry unit based in Toronto, Ontario, part of 4th Canadian Division's 32 Canadian Brigade Group. Today, the regiment has a total of three companies:

  • Grenadier Company (operational)
  • Toronto Company (training)
  • 58th Company (logistics)

Additionally there are two Army Cadet Corps that wear the Royal Regiment of Canada Cap Badge:

  • 2736 RCACC Fort York Armoury, which parades with the regiment as "Batoche Company" [1]
  • 3045 RCACC Arctic Bay, Canada's Northernmost Army Cadet Corps

The ceremonial dress uniform of The Royal Regiment of Canada is the scarlet tunic and bearskin similar to that of the Grenadier Guards. The plume is red over white similar to the former Canadian Guards regiment.

Lineage

The Royal Regiment of Canada originated in Toronto, Ontario on 14 March 1862, as The 10th Battalion Volunteer Militia Rifles, Canada. It was redesignated The 10th Battalion Volunteer Militia (Infantry), Canada, on 21 November 1862, the Tenth or "Royal Regiment of Toronto Volunteers" on 10 April 1863, the 10th Battalion "Royal Grenadiers" on 5 August 1881, the 10th Regiment "Royal Grenadiers" on 8 May 1900 and The Royal Grenadiers on 1 May 1920. On 15 December 1936, it was amalgamated with The Toronto Regiment and redesignated The Royal Regiment of Toronto Grenadiers. It was redesignated as The Royal Regiment of Canada on 11 February 1939, the 2nd Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Canada, on 7 November 1940 and The Royal Regiment of Canada on 31 December 1945.[2]

The Toronto Regiment originated in Toronto, Ontario on 1 May 1920. On 15 December 1936, it was amalgamated with The Royal Grenadiers.[2]

Perpetuations

The Royal Regiment of Canada perpetutes the 3rd Battalion (Toronto Regiment), CEF, the 58th Battalion, CEF, the 123rd Battalion (Royal Grenadiers), CEF, the 124th Battalion (Governor General's Body Guard), CEF, the 170th Battalion (Mississauga Horse), CEF, and the 204th Battalion (Beavers), CEF.[2]

Operational history

The Fenian Raids

The Royal Regiment of Toronto Volunteers was called out on active service from 8 to 31 March and from 1 to 22 June 1866. The battalion served on the Niagara frontier.[2]

North West Rebellion

The 10th Battalion "Royal Grenadiers" mobilized detachments for active service on 10 April 1885 which served with Middleton's Column of the North West Field Force, until they were removed from active service on 24 July 1885.[2]

South African War

The 10th Battalion "Royal Grenadiers" contributed volunteers for the Canadian Contingents during the South African War.[2]

The Great War


Details of the 10th Regiment "Royal Grenadiers" were placed on active service on 6 August 1914 for local protection duties.[2]

The 3rd Battalion (Toronto Regiment), CEF was authorized on 10 August 1914 and embarked for Great Britain on 26 September 1914. It disembarked in France on 11 February 1915, where it fought as part of the 1st Infantry Brigade, 1st Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war. The battalion was disbanded on 15 September 1920.

The 58th Battalion, CEF, was authorized on 20 April 1915 and embarked for Great Britain on 22 November 1915. It disembarked in France on 22 February 1916, where it fought as part of the 9th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war. The battalion was disbanded on 15 September 1920. Its battalion history is captured in the book, "Second to None" by Kevin Shackleton.

The 123rd Battalion (Royal Grenadiers), CEF, was authorized on 22 December 1915 and embarked for Great Britain on 7 and 8 August 1916. It was converted to pioneers and redesignated the 123rd Canadian Pioneer Battalion, CEF on 17 January 1917. It disembarked in France on 10 March 1917, where it served as part of the 3rd Canadian Division in France and Flanders until 25 May 1918, when its personnel were absorbed by the 7th, 8th and 9th Canadian Engineer Battalions, CEF. The battalion was disbanded on 15 September 1920.

The 124th Battalion (Governor General's Body Guard), CEF, was authorized on 22 December 1915 and embarked for Great Britain on 7 August 1916. It was redesignated the 124th Canadian Pioneer Battalion, CEF, on 17 January 1917. It disembarked in France on 11 March 1917, where it served as part of the 4th Canadian Division in France and Flanders until 26 May 1918, when its personnel were absorbed by the 10th, 11th and 12th Canadian Engineer Battalions, CEF. The battalion was disbanded on 15 September 1920.

The 170th Battalion (Mississauga Horse), CEF, was authorized on 15 July 1916 and embarked for Great Britain on 25 October 1916. On 8 December 1916, its personnel were absorbed by the 169th Battalion (109th Regiment), CEF, to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field. The battalion was disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The 204th Battalion (Beavers), CEF, was authorized on 15 July 1916 and embarked for Great Britain on 28 March 1917. On 4 May 1917, its personnel were absorbed by the 2nd Reserve Battalion, CEF, to provide reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field. The battalion was disbanded on 17 July 1917.

The Second World War

The regiment mobilized the The Royal Regiment of Canada, CASF for active service on 1 September 1939. It embarked for garrison duty in Iceland with "Z" Force on 10 June 1940, and on 31 October 1940 it was transferred to Great Britain. It was redesignated the 1st Battalion, The Royal Regiment of Canada, CASF on 7 November 1940. The battalion took part in the raid on Dieppe on 19 August 1942. It landed again in France on 7 July 1944, as part of the 4th Infantry Brigade, 2nd Canadian Infantry Division, and continued to fight in North-West Europe until the end of the war. The overseas battalion was disbanded on 31 December 1945.

The Raid on Dieppe - Blue Beach


The naval engagement between the small German convoy and the craft carrying No. 3 Commando had alerted the German defenders at Blue Beach.[3] The Royal Regiment of Canada landed near Puys along with three platoons from the Black Watch of Canada and an artillery detachment who were tasked to neutralize machine gun and artillery batteries protecting the Dieppe beach.[3] They were delayed by 20 minutes and the smoke screens that should have hidden their assault had lifted, with the advantage of surprise and darkness lost the Germans had manned their defensive positions in preparation for the landings.[3] The well emplaced German forces held the Canadian forces that did land on the beach. As soon as they reached the shore, the Canadians found themselves pinned against the seawall and unable to advance.[3] The Royals suffered severe casualties: of the 556 men in the regiment 200 were killed and 264 captured.[3]

The regiment evolved from the 10th Royal Grenadiers and thus inherited British traditions. The regiment was authorized to wear the distinctive scarlet uniform of the "Guards" on all ceremonial occasions by decree of Queen Victoria. It is also sixth in the order of precedence.

Battle honours

Those battle honours in bold type are emblazoned on the regimental colour.

The North West Rebellion

The South African War

The Great War

The Second World War

Band of The Royal Regiment of Canada


The Band of The Royal Regiment of Canada is the oldest permanently organized band in the Canadian Forces. Based at Fort York in Toronto, Ontario, the band has continued to serve its country, province, and city in many different roles throughout the world since its formation in 1863.

Some highlights from the band's itinerary are:

  • Performances for the Queen Mother, Princess Anne, the Duke of York, Prince Charles and Queen Elizabeth II.
  • International commitments include: performances for the United Nations in Cyprus; the Military Musical Pageant, held at Wembley Stadium, in London, England; a command performance for the colonel-in-chief, Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, in the Gardens of Buckingham Palace; and, being selected as the official band to accompany the veterans and the official party to the United Kingdom and France to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the raid on Dieppe August 19, 1942. In the summer of 2006 the band performed at the 16th International Military Band Festival in Kraków, Poland.

Recent years have seen the band travel from Gander, Newfoundland and Labrador, to Victoria, British Columbia, with many performances in between (including the launching of the ship the Hector in Pictou, Nova Scotia, The Summerside Tattoo in Prince Edward Island, and the 2000 International Military Festival of Music in Quebec City). In addition there have been numerous trips to the United States to participate in events such as the historic Fort Ticonderoga Tattoo and The Rochester International Marine Tattoo in New York State, the TRADOC Military Tattoo in Fort Monroe, Virginia, and the Stone Mountain Highland Games Military Tattoo in Atlanta, Georgia.

The band’s four recordings: Ready Aye Ready; In Concert, On Parade; Footsteps in Time; and Fields of Honour, have been met with enthusiastic response and won wide critical acclaim.

The various groups within the main musical organization are extremely active. Their wide ranging activities include live, televised and broadcast music, colourful marching displays, concert performances, ceremonial fanfare trumpets, opening ceremonies at many functions and conventions, and dance and reception music.

The Director of Music for the band is Captain William Mighton, CD, Mus. Bac., RRC.

The Director of Music Emeritus is Major Gino Falconi, SBStJ, KLMC, CD, Mus. Bac. RRC (Ret’d).

The Drum Major is D/Maj. M.E. Morello, CD, RRC

The Drum Major Emeritus is CWO R.L. Scott, CD, RRC (Ret'd).

The Band Sergeant Major is BSM K. Burnett-Longman

More information regarding the band can be found on their homepage.

The Royal Regiment of Canada Association

The Royal Regiment of Canada Association consists of former members of the unit. The association meets the first Wednesday of each month September to June in the Royal Regiment of Canada Warrant Officers and Sergeants Mess in Canadian Forces Armoury, Fort York. The main goal of the association is to maintain the comradeship and esprit du corps of the regimental family. The association in 2008 co-ordinated a successful fund-raising campaign aimed at obtaining sufficient stocks of the scarlet and blue full dress of the regiment to enable the majority of its personnel to parade in this traditional uniform on ceremonial occasions.

The association also maintains a site focused on the history and ongoing activities of the unit. www.rregtc-assoc.ca

Royal Regiment of Canada Museum

Royal Regiment of Canada Museum
Location Fort York Armoury, 660 Fleet Street West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Type Regimental Museum

The museum preserves and displays the history of The Royal Regiment of Canada and its several predecessors for the benefit of both the members of the Regiment and the public at large.[4] The museum is affiliated with: CMA, CHIN, OMMC and Virtual Museum of Canada. The regiment's museum is located at the Fort York Armoury. Exhibits include weapons, uniforms, medals, photographs and artifacts about the history of The Royal Regiment of Canada and its predecessors – the 10th Royal Grenadiers, 3rd Battalion (Toronto Regiment) and 123rd, 124th, 204th and 58th Battalions, Canadian Expeditionary Force. The museum offers displays and school tours by appointment.

Alliances

Fort York Armoury

Home of the Royal Regiment of Canada

  • 660 Fleet St W. Toronto, ON M5V 1A9

Order of precedence

Preceded by
Les Voltigeurs de Québec
The Royal Regiment of Canada Succeeded by
The Royal Hamilton Light Infantry (Wentworth Regiment)

See also

Canadian Armed Forces portal

References

Books

  • W R Bennett "Historical vignettes of the Royal Regiment of Canada" (Toronto: Royal Regiment of Canada, 1999)
  • J Brian Gilchrist "Sacred to the memory of—: the memorials at the Cathedral Church of St. James (Anglican), Toronto, Ontario : transcriptions of the plaques, tombstones, stained glass windows and other engraved memorials along with the Book of Remembrance for World War II of the Royal Regiment of Canada (Toronto: J. Gilchrist, 1996)
  • D J Goodspeed "Battle royal: a history of the Royal Regiment of Canada, 1862-1962" (Toronto, Montreal, McClelland and Stewart, 1967)
  • "Brief history of the Royal Regiment of Canada: allied with the King's Regiment (Liverpool)". (Toronto, Ont.: The Regiment, 1948)

CD

  • Royal Regiment of Canada Band "O Canada" Music CD audio (S.l.: Mastersound, ©1998)

External links

  • The Royal Regiment of Canada - official site
  • History and Uniform of the Royal Regiment of Canada, 1862 to 1970
  • Royal Regiment of Canada Museum
  • Information on the Royals Museum

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