World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Sill plate

Article Id: WHEBN0008907461
Reproduction Date:

Title: Sill plate  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Framing (construction), Wood products, Door, American historic carpentry, Lumber
Collection: Architectural Elements, Carpentry, Construction Terminology, Structural System, Woodworking
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Sill plate

Unusual sill framing in a granary of half-timber construction. Long tenons project through the sill plate. Timber sills can span gaps in a foundation.

A sill plate or sole plate in construction and architecture is the bottom horizontal member of a wall or building to which vertical members are attached. The word plate is typically omitted in America and carpenters speak simply of the "sill". Other names are ground plate, ground sill, groundsel,[1] and mud sill. Sill plates are usually composed of lumber but can be any material. The timber at the top of a wall is often called a top plate, pole plate, wall plate or simply "the plate".

Contents

  • Timber sills 1
  • Stick framing 2
  • Automobiles 3
  • Naval architecture 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Timber sills

An unusual barn in Schoonebeek, Netherlands with interrupted sills, the posts land directly on the padstone foundation. Image: Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands
Norwegian style framing, Kravik Mellom, Norway

In historic buildings the sills were almost always large, solid timbers framed together at the corners, carry the bents, and are set on the stone or brick foundation walls, piers, or piles (wood posts driven or set into the ground). The sill typically carries the wall framing (posts and studs) and floor joists.

There are rare examples of historic buildings in the U.S. where the floor joists land on the foundation and a plank sill or timber sill sit on top of the joists.[2] Another rare, historic building technique is for the posts of a timber frame building to land directly on a foundation or in the ground and the sills fit between the posts and are called interrupted sills.

Stick framing

In modern, wood construction sills usually come in sizes of 2×4, 2×6, 2×8, and 2×10. In stick framing (construction) the sill is made of treated lumber and are anchored to the foundation wall, often with J-bolts to keep the building from coming off the foundation during a severe storm or earthquake. Building codes require that the bottom of the sill plate be kept 6 to 8 inches above the finished grade. This is a building code requirement to hinder termites and prevent the sill plate from rotting.

Automobiles

In automobiles, the sill plate is located underneath the door and sometimes displays the make or model of the vehicle.

Naval architecture

In naval architecture, sill also refers to the lower horizontal plate (frame) height, above which doors and access opening are fixed.

References

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary Ground sill
  2. ^ Sobon, Jack A.. Historic American timber joinery: a graphic guide. Fourth printing. ed. Becket: Timber Framers Guild, 2010. pp 21, 22.
  • Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (2005). Canadian Wood-Frame House Construction. ISBN 0-660-19535-6

External links

  • http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca - Official Government Website regarding the above referenced book.
  • [1] - Historic American Timber Joinery: A Graphic Guide
  • [2] - US Coast Guard Load Line Technical Manual
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.